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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum

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  1. 4 points
    I to would like to wish every one a happy Christmas and a healthy new year , but most of all I would like to thank the mods and the few regular posters that still take the time to read and reply to anyone who posts on here , without them this forum would slowly disappear into cyberspace or where ever they go , I know face book seems to be taking over but being of the older generation I am not really happy over there............. so once again big thanks all and have a great Christmas Take care all …….Mick
  2. 3 points
    I don't know about anyone else, {BUT} I just love Christmas., all the decorations, cantatas, food and of course we can't forget the Drink. But just look into the kids eyes {sparkle & dancing} why even the adults are acting much more civilized. There is actually love in the air {sometime}. Just want to wish each and everyone of you the most blessed & healthy Christmas & New Year you have ever had. ann
  3. 3 points
    Let's see...I'm upright, I'm walking, I have a lovely prosthesis that fits like a dream, and I have a ticket for what sounds like it's going to be a lovely and rather elegant New Year's Eve gathering..........May 2014 continue in this vein for all of us! Happy New Year, gang!
  4. 3 points
    Hi there Mike and welcome to our little corner of the world. For those of us in the USA, we're just coming off a long holiday weekend, so that might account for the lack of replies on this end...don't know what's got our Brits distracted, but I'm sure you'll start getting some responses soon. I'm an elective left below-knee amp myself. Have been for almost nine years, now...suffered a bad break in my left foot that kept breaking down every time they thought they'd gotten a repair and good healing. Yeah, the pain was not fun, and eventually the foot broke down one time too many and I developed a MRSA infection. After that got cleared up, I was offered a choice kind of like yours: re-try the longest-lasting of the previous repair attempts and keep me in a cast for many, many more months than what is considered "usual," or do the LBK amputation. It took me only about an hour to decide that I needed to lose my foot in order to reclaim my life. For what it's worth, I've never regretted that decision. It sounds to me like having a plastic surgeon involved might be a good thing, considering the extent of your previous injuries. My own amp was done by an Ortho, but I didn't have major issues at the site of my surgery. I've heard good things about Plastics and creating a limb that will be good for walking with a prosthesis. Do try to educate your self as much as possible about what you're going to be facing. Don't be afraid to ask questions of your doctors, ask to meet with a prosthetist, and, if at all possible, see if you can meet some other BK amps...just seeing how others get about and being able to get their input on "how to get on with life" can be a tremendous reassurance. And post any questions that come up here as well...when you're facing such a drastic change in your life, there is absolutely no such thing as a "stupid question." You're young and you deserve to be able to be active and enjoy your kids...and for your "basic BK amp," that's a real, attainable goal. Hang in there...you'll manage it!
  5. 2 points
    http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/david-cameron-to-make-all-microprocessor-controlled-knees-available-on-the-nhs?share_id=pHngwpjvjh&utm_campaign=share_button_mobile&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=share_petition
  6. 2 points
    Hi everyone!!! A big part of me thinks some animals have it right when they hibernate over the winter - but then we'd miss out on all the holiday fun Sorry I haven't really posted on here, been one of those years since the forum 're-launched' itself. Currently out of work and having no joy trying to find employment - which means I can't blame lack of time for not contributing! Due to have my third grandchild in the next 2 or 3 weeks, so if I disappear for a while, I will return! All the best everyone, and may 2014 be as good as it can for you all.
  7. 2 points
    Wishing you all a very happy New Year and best wishes for the year to come. Thanks to the Heather Mills moderators and other 'workers' in the back rooms of cyberspace who continue to keep the website up, running and safe.
  8. 2 points
    AGREE!!!! A very happy future to all & may this YEAR be the best.
  9. 2 points
    HEAR HEAR TO ALL THOSE GOOD WISHES. May it be a happy and healthy 2014. I am now getting geared up for New Year celebrations - as an expat Scot living in London, we have to lead the way so, folks I shall be sort of dancing the night away come next Tuesday. A VERY HAPPY FUTURE TO ALL AND MAY THIS YEAR BE THE BEST YET!
  10. 2 points
    Well , the turkeys been eaten , the last cracker pulled and we're onto the Stilton and Port so all that's left to do today is to wish all of you a very Merry Christmas and here's hoping for a healthy and Happy New Year to come!!
  11. 2 points
    Thank you all for the comments , it wasn’t meant to be anything special photo wise just a sort of dairy of where I walked this year , something to look back on when I am having one of those bad spells that we all get now and then .
  12. 2 points
    Okay...one final update, plus some info on the "teflon-ish" patches. I saw the doctor today and he was very, very pleased with the way things are holding up! On several occasions, he's pulled in all the various podiatry residents to show off and discuss my FFWs, and he did so again today. After letting everyone take a look at the former site of the latest FFW, he informed us all that my right foot is currently "the best he's ever seen it." My former callus has settled into just nice, flat, durable skin, and the patch looks like it's going to work. (Hooray!!) After the little celebration in the exam room, I asked for more info about the little blue teflon-ish thing hanging out in my right shoe. So here goes........... It's called a "PTFE patch." It's a strong, tough, waxy, nonflammable synthetic resin produced by the polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene. It actually is a variety of teflon, and it's manufactured to fill in microscopic spaces. The PTFE part of this patch is commonly available at just about any home improvement center...where it's known as PLUMBERS' TAPE. Yeah...you fasten plumbers' tape to an adhesive paper backing and you get the thing that saved my right foot. (Good grief! ) Doc says that it's becoming popular in podiatry circles and orthotics manufactuing. He's never heard of it being used in a prosthesis, but those prosthetists who also build/fit orthotics are most likely aware of the PTFE patch...if you have a "sticking problem" that leads to skin shear injuries, you might want to talk to your prosthetist about giving it a try. So that's the story of the 2013 FFW. May it never recur again!
  13. 2 points
    Hi Mike, I am in Uk. I had 30 operations to try to save my leg...including wearing a full leg Ilazirov frame for 18 months, turning the bolts every 4 hours.....it was a nightmare! I opted for above knee amputation after the fusions failed. I had my amputation 8 years ago, I ended up having 6 further surgeries after amputation because of other issues. I too had closed compartment syndrome, I did not have the information that you have, from the consultants you have seen, ie muscle salvage etc. it seems clear to me that your amputation is not a straight forward one. I think that if you decide to go ahead with it you must accept that it is not going to be an easy process, you probably won't have you amputation, heal, get fitted with leg and walk within the normal time period, ie a few months. Your journey is going to be a hard one. Sounds like you have decided already. I guess I just want to wish you and your family the best possible outcome for you, it will be a hard journey for you all. If you are aware of that initially it may help. I remember having such high expectations, get rid of leg, get rid of pain, more mobile. I looked at active above knee amps and thought that would be me after my amputation. I was wrong, lots more surgeries, failed leg fittings, spending thousands trying to get fitted. Now having to accept that although after 8 years I have a leg I can wear, I can only wear it for short periods of time, I can't walk without crutches. I am not being negative, just stating my facts. I really do hope that your amputation improves things for you, just be realistic about your personal situation and complications and make sure you have the right people on board both medically and personally. The very best if luck to you. I would not wish an Ilazirov frame on anyone so, either way you would have a hard journey ahead of you. I don't frequent this site often these days but just wanted to reply as my situation is so similar to yours except that I am above knee amp. Keep us up to date with your progress. Good luck.
  14. 2 points
    Hi Mike Just wanted to wish you good luck with your op. I am a UK amp, didn't have to make the decision you're having to make as my legs were amp'd following crush injuries immediately after an accident, but do know about living life as a below knee amputee and don't have too many complaints about it really, my life has been pretty good. I am also mum to three, now grown up children, who know nothing but their mum being an amputee and as children they often accompanied me at prosthetic fittings and took it as pretty much normal really. I don't think I missed out on too much being an amputee mum and though they might well have their own opinions, I don't think they missed out on too much either, we are just a normal family and they seem to have grown into reasonably adjusted adults, so everything is possible. As Kate has said, there can be frustrations along the way. Having had revision surgery a few years back I would probably say the time between the surgery and prosthetic fitting probably the tedious bit, though you will be eager to get going on your prosthesis, get the healing bit right and the prosthetic fitting will be easier and everything does depend on that prosthesis/socket fitting you correctly. As Kate also says, the first year or so your leg will be shrinking, you will probably be back and forth for numerous socket fittings but it does all settle down gradually and when you look back in six months or so you will probably be amazed at how well you have progressed. Like others have said, find out as much info as you can, I think its pretty much routine in the UK now for pre-elective amps to visit DSC's, talk to rehab consultants, prosthetists etc and meet other amps and learn about their experiences, ask also about the type of prosthesis you are likely to be given initially, think it always helps to know but remember the first type they give you doesn't automatically mean that's the only type you will use, there will no doubt be many changes over the months and years to come. Hope all goes well for you, ask any questions on here and don't forget to let us know how you are doing.
  15. 2 points
    Okay, gang...we may be wrapping this thread up! I'M UP AND WALKING AGAIN! Today was my first day to really get out and walk a bit in the pursuit of real life...I'm exhausted, and it's amazing just how stiff and sore my back is, but I'm vertical and mobile again. Now we just see how the teflon-ish patch works out. I can actually feel the FFW site sliding over the patch...I hope it's really doing its job and keeping the stress off that part of the foot. We shall see..............
  16. 2 points
    Hi Mick, It really stinks to hear some people are so angry that some one else won't just sit on their backside and not try to regain their life. I guess that probably makes me naive to think common sense should prevail. Perhaps it is over simplifying but it is their loss and your gain Mick. And to anyone else who wants to do so - give it your all! What's to lose! Jane
  17. 2 points
    UPDATE TIME: I've been declared "technically healed" of the FFW!!!!!! That "technically" part is that the new skin is still very, very delicate...so Doc has requested that I spend another ten days in the wheelchair (but without a footrest), so that the new skin will have a chance to "toughen up" a bit before I start walking again. I can do that! On a related note, in the three weeks since my last appointment there has been a new, non-surgical, possibility that's popped up to try and take some stress off the FFW spot. I've been given some small, adhesive teflon-ish patches which, once I'm back in a regular shoe, I am supposed to stick onto my orthotics where my darling little sesamoid bones hit. The theory is that the sesamoids will slide harmlessly over the slick patch, so there will be no pulling on the skin...and therefore no FFW. It's an experiment, but if it works I should be able to walk without fear of breaking the skin. If it doesn't work, we're back to doing the pair of surgeries...so think good thoughts about small, adhesive, teflon-ish patches for me, gang! Hooray! I should be walking and driving again well before Thanksgiving this year!
  18. 2 points
    Yes, indeed...we can't let the Brits take all the credit for living in beautiful places! I've never gotten to see much of the east coast, Jane, so bring on the NH pics!
  19. 2 points
    Hi Everyone, I don't have any of Mick's photographic skiklllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll,jmnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn...cat on the key board input.....any one relate? Going on.....I plan to be on my brothers sail boat off the the coast of NH (USA) seacoast and if I can find my camera charger perhaps I can add some, none as energetic, but, very nice photos from our shore. In our case "shore" is not plural. NH shore is yyyyyyyyyyyhvgffffffffffffffffffffffa (cat editorial input again ) very small 13 mile expanse. In case anyone asks, yes they have been fed, but if you ask them they will deny having food anytime in the last year or more. My teenagers must have coached them in this mindset. They give the same response no matter what the questions. Good thoughts to all! Jane
  20. 2 points
    Thanks, Ann! Yeah, my choral group has just started working on material for both a Veteran's Day performance for the city and our annual holiday concert. Last year my nasty little sore kept me hospitalized for all of Fall and Winter...I think I was discharged just two days before Christmas. This year, the FFW is much smaller and not infected, so I'm able to be at home...and since our rehearsal hall is right next door to my apartment building, I've even made it to rehearsals! (I'm just really hoping that any foot surgery that comes up can be scheduled around performances .) I did a dressing change today, and I think the sore is getting better.........let's hope I'm right!
  21. 2 points
    I agree on the great pics, Mick...and I'm glad I checked out Bob's description of the trek, since I kept looking and looking at that photo of him sniffing at heaven-knows-what and thinking "bird? bunny? some kind of odd reptile in a pile of fur?" "Dead sheep's head" would never have crossed my mind, although it made perfect sense once I knew what it was!
  22. 2 points
    LOL Kate, perhaps he just doesn't want a new shower!! I have just been 'project managing' my first ever adaptations to our home to make part of it more wheelchair accessible, its been quite interesting working with different builders and firms trying to get what i wanted and more or less have succeeded in getting it how I needed and wanted it. It never ceases to amaze me what other people 'think' I need and don't realize that what might be helpful to some people with certain disabilities isn't always what is helpful to amputees. I did get in touch with an OT to start off with, because I thought we might be able to get a grant to help with costs (we couldn't), who insisted on checking out the rest of the home too, but I think they did realize I was quite clear on what I wanted done, but found really was only there as sort of admin to give advice on the process of possible grants not to really help on the building side of things, might be different with showers though. Cheryl ..... I too have been using a 'naked leg' this year and get stuff like that all the time, some interesting comments have come from other amps, like 'why is one socket longer than the other' and recently from someone else 'oh you haven't got a proper leg on'.
  23. 2 points
    Hi Friends Old and New! Been away for too long but had to share this with you all. When the hot weather comes I like many of you suffer from a sweaty stump, last week my chiropodist gave me a tip, been doing it ever since and it works no more sweaty stumps! He told me to try Witch hazel a natural product applied with a cotton pad, don't ask me ehy or how it works but it does may also help swelling and itching. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witch-hazel Take care all of you Neil x
  24. 1 point
    wonderful photos as ever Mick, I especially like the last one of the light coming through the trees - very autumnal and so atmospheric it could be a set for 'Lord of the Rings'!
  25. 1 point
    Not for frustration, but I think I can top you for "humor." I wore a standard cosmesis on my leg for the first several years after my amp. The first time I was being fitted for a "naked" leg, I visited a friend who knew I was an amputee and who had seen my previous covered legs. She looked at the new socket, the pylon, and the foot with a sock and a shoe on it, and she said...... "So just what DID they do when you had your surgery? Did they only take off the MIDDLE of your leg?" Yeah. Right. They left the foot and just jabbed the pylon into it. Sure..............
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