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Lizzie2

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Lizzie2 last won the day on June 5 2013

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About Lizzie2

  • Rank
    Super Member
  • Birthday January 29

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    UK

Profile Fields

  • Membership Type:
    Amputee
  • Amputation Type:
    AK & BK
  • Amputation Date:
    07-07-1963
  • Amputation Cause:
    congenital anomalies

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  1. Lizzie2

    Disability Living Allowance debate

    Sorry, I don't come on here often ... Yes, things will be very difficult for single lower limb amps, OBL. There is currently a 20m rule - if you can walk 20m for 50% of the time in a 6 month period, you won't eligable for the higher rate PIP. For bilateral lower limb amps, there is some respite, as In the PIP definitions it says that 'to stand' means to have at least one biological foot on the floor...so no bilateral lower limb amp will be able to stand (for the purposes of PIP) and they will, therefore, be able to claim the higher rate of PIP. The new benefit will affect.amps and people with neurological conditions such a Parkinsons, MS and CP. I'm seriously unimpressed and worry that there will be a lot more people with disabilities who will become housebound.
  2. Sounds like an inflammed (possibly infected?) sebaceous cyst, to me. If they're longstanding, they can become calcified (e.g. hard). I would imagine that you need a leg with a hole again? and possibly some antibiotics? Either way, you need to see your family doctor, just to make sure. Hope it heals well. x
  3. Yes, but you mention the ischium which is part of your pelvis, not your femur. If you read here it says that most hip fractures are femoral fractures. So, you need weight to go through the femur to help improve bone density in the femur. Socket design and amputation techniques both contribute to osteopenia, which puts amputees at risk of 'hip' fracture. Gibby sounds as though she's already doing a lot to help her bone density. @Gibby ~ I've been told that the only thing that stops trans-femoral amps from weightbearing through their femurs, is the small surface area of the end of their femurs. One or two amps have been able to weightbear. I think they check it's OK for them to do it first. Then they do it very gingerly; building up gradiually, starting with partial weightbearing on soft surfaces. That is the only thing I can think of that would help improve your bone density. I'm not being funny, but if that's the case, you'll understand that as your ischium is part of your pelvis, it's not your hip. So, weight will still be partly taken by the soft tissues and not through the femur. I also have what you call a brimless socket ... that's how I know.
  4. Thanks, Ann. Things have been pretty tough lately, I have to say ...
  5. Yes, but you mention the ischium which is part of your pelvis, not your femur. If you read here it says that most hip fractures are femoral fractures. So, you need weight to go through the femur to help improve bone density in the femur. Socket design and amputation techniques both contribute to osteopenia, which puts amputees at risk of 'hip' fracture. Gibby sounds as though she's already doing a lot to help her bone density. @Gibby ~ I've been told that the only thing that stops trans-femoral amps from weightbearing through their femurs, is the small surface area of the end of their femurs. One or two amps have been able to weightbear. I think they check it's OK for them to do it first. Then they do it very gingerly; building up gradiually, starting with partial weightbearing on soft surfaces. That is the only thing I can think of that would help improve your bone density.
  6. There's only one (possibly two?) amps, that I know of, who bear weight through their 'trans' femurs ... Eddie101 springs to mind. x
  7. There are two things here, I think? One is that a 'fractured hip' usually describes a fractured neck of femur (thigh bone). The other is bone density in general ... I'm sorry to say that practically all amputees have some degree of osteopenia (i.e. low bone density) in their residual limb ... some have even developed osteoporosis (i.e. seriously low bone density). It has to do with how we weighbear in the socket. Most amps nowadays are transfemoral or transtibial, as they've gone away from end bearing amputations ... basically, because transfemoral or transtibial sockets are easier to fit, as they don't have any nobbly bits at the end. Can you believe it?! In transfemoral & transtibial sockets quite a bit of weight is taken in the soft tissues, as most amps find it difficult to directly end-bear ... because they no longer have something with a large enough surface area that can bear weight. I wonder if this method of weightbearing is why amps have so many soft tissue problems? Anyway, bone density depends, so I am reliably informed, on how much weight is going directly through the bone and also how often ... little and often weightbearing (i.e. directly through the bone) is most the effective way to maintain or increase bone density. So, would I imagine that standing on your amputated side against a wall would not substantially help bone density in your femur? We can't do much about weightbearing in our sockets, but we can do other things to help maintain bone health. There are lots of helpfulwebpages on the subject, but here's one of them. x
  8. Having had a chat with you Kate, it seems you'd probably be classed as a bilateral amp ... so you have two residual limbs ... my mistake ... and snap!
  9. Sounds like you have a lot of damage there ... ? Have they tested how much muscle activity you have? There's a littlle hand held device that your physio should know about that can show them how much activity there is in a muscle ... they just put it against your skin, you move your muscle and it show the strength of the muscle. If it's very painful or difficult, I would imagine you need to do it gently and often ... ? and have lots of ice packs and pain relief around. x.
  10. Thought that may be the case. All the terms can be a bit of a nightmare ... Your 'residual limb' is the leg that has been amputated ... it's the bit of the limb that's left after amputation. Your remaining limb is your healthy, intact limb. x
  11. Sorry, but I don't understand?
  12. Hmm ... that's what I used to think ...
  13. A few things that quickly come to mind ~ * Use ergonomic hand grips that are made of a medium density material (i.e. not hard plastic). * Get your physio to teach you some core stability exercises. You can do some great ones in the pool. * Try to buy your own crutches. * For extra stability you could try something like a gutter frame. I believe the trendy ones have four wheels and brakes! And, lastly, try to gradually build up to using your upper body, otherwise you could easily suffer from overuse injuries.
  14. Lizzie2

    Knee replacement surgery

    I've had a hip replacement too, Micky ... on my AK side ... not boasting or anything. You definitely won't be able to use the same socket after that op. Please PM me for more details about that op, as I don't like sharing such personal stuff on forums. As far as your TKR goes, if you sit sideways on and sit on a pressure relieving cushion or memory foam mattress/cushion it should stop you from falling off - the limb should go on as it always has. If it doesn't, get it part way on and use something like a perching stool - sit on the stool and loosen your limb, then slide into it. If you're taking pain meds or any other medication, it may cause you to retain water and that could affect your socket fit.
  15. Lizzie2

    Anyone with knowledge of hemipelvectomy?

    Hi Steve I don't have a hemipelvectomy, but I know someone who does and I also know people who have had hip disarticulations. If you need further info please PM me. Otherwise, please take a look at this site - http://www.beenamputatie.nl/ Lizzie :)
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