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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum

Sparky

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Sparky last won the day on July 4 2014

Sparky had the most liked content!

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About Sparky

  • Rank
    Super Member
  • Birthday 07/22/1952

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Derbyshire,UK
  • Interests
    I enjoy fishing, travel, my grandchildren and very passionate about photography -https://www.instagram.com/3_free_wheels/

Previous Fields

  • Membership Type:
    Amputee
  • Amputation Type:
    Bilateral Below Knee
  • Amputation Date:
    03-02-2006
  • Amputation Cause:
    Childhood injuries
  1. It's really quite here

    Once upon a time, long ago... In a far off land called Lego
  2. It's really quite here

    Yes, I agree with you...it is sad. We had a great time before the trouble with the web-site. I hope slowly they will jump back in and join us again. We just have to show them "they miss us" at one time we even wrote stories, one line @ a time. Its summer might have alot to do with it...everyone is so busy. Hi Ann, I've been on Holiday, 2 weeks in Tenerife. When something stops you tend to find something else to replace it and get yourself intergrated. It's hard to go back to something and pick up where you left off. Start us off with your first line of a never ending story.
  3. Good to be back

    Never thought I'd miss it then it went off line - nice to have it back
  4. 2011

  5. switching feet (Bilaterals)

    I have Blatchford's Navigator feet, had them since 2007. when I was first fitted with them I wore them for about hour and half while they tweaked everything and I mean everything, from ankle to knee. My leg girl then told me to put my old legs back on - I could hardly walk in them. With the Navigator feet I felt a lot more confident walking on slopes, climbing stairs and I was able to walk a lot faster. I've been told the technical reason why they feel so good it is because the ankle can plantarflex (point the toes) to 12deg. Normal walking has 15deg so this is pretty close to normal walking and so you use less energy when walking on them. If you are still getting lots of aches and pains in the legs get your leg people to look at adjusting everything that can be adjusted.
  6. Mick, I was in St Abbs last May and guess what...
  7. Five miles Mick. Thats a fair walk for a bilateral. Don't think I could make that. That five miles would be like an eight/nine mile walk for me just because I'm a bilat and use more energy. Everything is trial and error, there isn't a wrong way only a way that suits you best. Maybe try and plan walks where there are suitable sized boulders to use as sitting/resting places. I quite like those 'resting places' Sparky. You sound like you have 'walked my walk' . Ann, I'll have a go at anything however, I have always recognised my weaknesses when it comes to being a BBk amputee and planned accordingly. That way I didn't ruin the day by not being able to cope.
  8. Five miles Mick. Thats a fair walk for a bilateral. Don't think I could make that. That five miles would be like an eight/nine mile walk for me just because I'm a bilat and use more energy. Everything is trial and error, there isn't a wrong way only a way that suits you best. Maybe try and plan walks where there are suitable sized boulders to use as sitting/resting places.
  9. Hello! Newbie here..

    Hi Hema, welcome to the forum.
  10. Hi Mick, I'm the same as Ann, never had a problem getting up off the ground. I used to start by getting onto my knees and then using my stick got up to my feet. After a bit of time I was able to get up without the stick. As Ann has stated your bilat might need to find their own method as arty leg fittings are different for everyone and will affect how they can bend and use their knees. I did try carrying a low collapsible stool but it was harder getting up from that.
  11. Feeling Sad.

    Life can be the hardest game to master, we all have gone through it and come out the other side better off. Getting your life back to what you want is for me worth a bit of surgery and pain.
  12. Pain, what a subject, everyone on here could write a book about pain and they would all be different and all be right. I have found after reading a lot of posts that the post op pain is down to the skill of your surgeon. You will have some pain and that should be managed by the staff. I had a bit of pain for the first day and then it was just stitches pulling and I was home about 3 days after the op, I was sent home with morphine, never used it.
  13. Just about everything you can think off races though your mind. I only waited about a week from being told to having my legs resized. I went into hospital the day before, I spent most of that night sat in the hospital car park wondering if I was doing the right thing and should I just go home. What did it in the end, I couldn't walk to the bus stop or back into the hospital. As it turned out it amputation was the right thing for me to do. Life in the beginning is going to be different, spend time working out how you are going to cope with your living environment and how you will overcome some of the obstacles - that's what I did to occupy myself. Good Luck
  14. is dangerously under-medicated.

  15. Question for all NHS patients

    What you say is very true, I've only been offered a particular brand although other brand components are advertised on the walls of the amputee clinic. My amputee consultant didn't really take much interest in the prosthetic side of things only my ability to cope with going back to work and managing at home with or without prosthetic legs, the mechanical side of things and what I should be given was left to the prosthetist. I will not even go on about NHS wheelchair services.
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