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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum

dporter

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About dporter

  • Rank
    Newbie

Profile Fields

  • Membership Type:
    Amputee
  • Amputation Type:
    RBK
  • Amputation Date:
    04-13-2000
  • Amputation Cause:
    premature birth
  1. dporter

    TIPS FOR DAILY LIVING AS AN AMPUTEE

    Hey everyone, I just wanted to add my favorite quote that I heard when I was taking my first steps. "Decide for yourself what your limitations are. There is always someone who says you'll never do this or you'll never do that. If you listen to these people, you'll spend the rest of your life in bed." Hope this encourages people.
  2. Hey I just wanted to ask, well I am a RBK and since a few years after my amputation I've had a callous on the end , on the spot where they stitched my heal pad to the skin on the bottom of my shin. I had it removed once but it came back and it's a real pain, in a couple ways. One if I've been walking all day(which is common with me) but having to use the rough stone pad thing ( i forget the name) and lotion and stuff, but it's a constant battle with it. Anyone have ideas to fix this? and also I've had a gel liner since my first leg , what is the difference with things like the Wool thing and silicone liners? If you have advice, I'm open to any ideas. Thanks, Darcy
  3. dporter

    To amputate or not!

    Hey, I just wanted to share my experience with this topic. Well, I was ten when my parents, me and doctor from birth(3 months premature) made the decision to amputate just below the ankle. I thought my life was ruined. I was a ten year old girl raised in a house full of athletes and becoming one myself. I was told, if we did this I would never be allowed to play soccer after that. Well, I think it was a majority rules kind of thing and if I knew what I know now about things like the ACA and Lakeshore Foundation in Birmingham and the Paralympics I would have made the choice to amputate right a way. I wouldn't be who I am and have done what I have if it hadn't been for making this hard choice. Yea the first few steps are hard and rough road, but a few years down the road I was playing able-bodied(AB) sports and making people wonder how I do it, but it's what I love and know (because of being an amputee) I am playing wheelchair basketball and wish I found it sooner than I did because it's just that great. Good luck with the decision and it's your life, live it how you think you want to live it. DOn't let an amputated leg/ or arm or whatever stop you. Darcy Alabama
  4. dporter

    driving

    Hi, I just wanted to add a new option for you. Depending on how much control you have of your right foot/leg. It is also possible (and easy to learn) to drive using both feet. I am 19 and finally got my license after trying many different ways. Use your left foot for the brake and right foot for gas. Best way is to start in an empty/ dead end street or parking lot and practice. This also makes it possible that if for some reason you were the only other person with a license and needed to drive, you can drive any car without worries. I was told it was illegal (in Alabama) to drive with prosthetics, but after investigation no such law was found. Some people just think it's dangerous, but having a sound fully controlable left foot for brake and a piece of metal for the gas works for me and got me a license with no retrictions. Just thought I'd add my experience for anyone interested or going through the same problem. --Darcy --Alabama
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