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LauraG

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Everything posted by LauraG

  1. LauraG

    Dating

    I haven't seen this asked here before and it will give us all a chance to share our experiences, tactics and ultimately funny stories about trying to relate to someone romantically. I'll tell mine if you tell yours. ;) Sound off...
  2. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    Lizzie, I'm sorry to insist, but I don't think I'm getting my point across effectively. The website doesn't argue that god doesn't exist because amputees do. The website argues that god doesn't exist because he doesn't answer prayers. They use us in their argument because it's a binary indicator. Either your limb regrows or it doesn't. Any equally unambiguous indicator could have been used. They chose amputees. I'm not sure how you arrive at "learning disability" or "problematic ego", but I'm sure most people acknowledge they're a small part of a huge universe. Belief in a god isn't a necessary part of that acknowledgement. That's easily accomplished by simply looking up at night. Believing in anything, including a god, is personal. That belief being true, however, isn't. I'm not debating yor right to believe. I'm debating the truth value of belief in a god. I don't believe in the supernatural because there isn't a shred of valid evidence supporting it. Some do, but not many. Around 90% of the scientists in the NAS have no belief in the supernatural. That aside, the number of scientists who believe or not is irrelevant to the question of the lack of evidence supporting the existence of the supernatural and the abundance of evidence against it. Those are all amazing scientific accomplishments and I'm looking forward to enjoying them. I'm sorry to hear you won't be participating in the thread any longer, but I disagree with the reasons you've based your decision on. I read the replies thoroughly and objectively. My answers are presented respectfully and, when required, appropriately supported. As for sensibility, that's quite subjective. The fact that you disagree with what I say doesn't mean I'm being insensitive. That said, I also enjoy a good debate and hope you reconsider your decision to leave this one.
  3. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    As a Rabbi he, of course, assumes the existence of a god. Even more, he assumes the existence of his god and no others. ...and of course, quantifying the unexplained is science's territory, not religion's. Faith is required by religion. In fact, it wouldn't be faith or religion if the existence of a god were adequately demonstrated. It would be knowledge. Again, the Rabbi's starting position is that, despite the lack of evidence supporting it, his god must exist. The default starting position of a rationalist is "let's follow the evidence where it takes us". If there were a shred of valid evidence supporting the existence of a god, I'd be the first to revert my position. I don't understand what you meant to express here. Not everyone needs a god to feel part of the universe. The fact is we're all part of it, belief or lack of it. Was the Rabbi open to the notion that he was worshipping the wrong god? What if he turns out going to Thor's hell because he believed in Yahweh all his life? Of course, but the website isn't debating the existence of amputees. It's debating the existence of Yahweh because of his lack of response to legitimate prayers asking for limb regrowth. Yep. Pretty witty.
  4. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    There's quite a bit more room for speculation of divine healing in blindness which is, I assume, the reason the site's authors didn't use it to illustrate their position. Why would he test you and what kind of results does he get from testing you with amputations that he couldn't get otherwise? I mean, an omniscient god wouldn't need to test you at all. He's supposed to know exactly how it's going to turn out even if he doesn't, so what's the point? Of course. Most of us do. Even those of us with no belief in the supernatural. My motivation to survive and thrive is having a better life, making myself, my daughter, my family and everyone else I can happy. I don't need to believe any god is testing me to achieve that. As I said above, you're perfectly entitled to your belief. In my case that would be me, my daughter, my family, my friends and whomever else I can make even a little happier. To state the obvious, I'm much happier alive than I would be dead. ;)
  5. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    Those are all important questions, Lizzie, but have nothing to do with the site's objective. What they are really asking is "why, when faced with an absolute situation (an amputee either regrows a limb or doesn't), are there no credible accounts of god intervening, while when the situation is less strightforward, all sorts of unsubstantiated attributions of divine healing pop up"? Amputation is just the absolute situation the site's authors needed to illustrate their point. Nothing demeaning to us there. You're obviously entitled to that belief. :)
  6. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    Hi, Lizzie. :) Would you mind stating the reasons you think the site's rubbish? Was there anything in the site that didn't make sense, or is it just an opinion based on your beliefs?
  7. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    While religious belief requires faith, by definition a suspension of reason, logic and reason have everything to do with a lack of religious belief. It is by reason and logic that we come to see the internal contradictions in the support for belief and we conclude, from evidence, that the supernatural doesn't exist. I can see how religious belief can be comforting, specially for someone in a psychological state deserving of concern, but that doesn't make religious belief rational or true. I prefer a painful verifiable fact over a lie. Most religions, if not all, claim to be "the one true religion" or to be based on "the revealed truth", so right off the bat you have a disqualification of other beliefs as weak or inferior. By your own definition, that's a morally repugnant statement reflective of underlying issues. Your assessment is verified by the sheer number of bloody conflicts caused throughtout history by differing religious beliefs.
  8. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    Define "silly". :P Seriously, though... I disagree with Kencor's assumption that the author of the site hates any god. There's a lot of rational statements in that website that would need addressing before jumping to that conclusion.
  9. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    Religious discussions tend to get quite heated... but if the mods OK it, I'll have a go.
  10. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    Hardly, but I'm not sure getting into a religious discussion of this depth is appropriate (or well-received) in this forum. Feel free to PM or e-mail me if you'd like to discuss further. :)
  11. LauraG

    WhywontGodhealamputees.com

    One of my favorite websites. Well thought-out and presented. It's also devastatingly rational. B)
  12. LauraG

    Prosthesis or Crutches?

    I've often wondered why it is most of the rehab professionals insist that the only proper way for an amputee to be 'rehabilitated' (I use the quotes with a bit of irony) is to have a prosthesis fitted, no matter how badly, and can't imagine someone feeling more comfortable and functional if they choose to forego the use of an artificial limb for crutches. I've heard a few PT's say they consider this a failure in terms of the rehab process and some go as far as to blame the patient for what I consider a perfectly reasonable personal choice. Is this the same in more industrialized nations? This is, of course, more of an issue with unilateral above-the-knee amputees, as we are less functional on our prosthetics than even bilateral below-the-knee amps and a lot of bilateral AKA's choose or have to use a wheelchair for reasons of either function or comfort. Personally, I choose crutches more often than my prosthesis, which I turn to for certain occasions when I prefer appearance to comfort, but I know my preferences stem from my rather poor peformance potential as far as prosthetics are concerned. Sound off!
  13. LauraG

    Prosthesis or Crutches?

    No need for the sad-faced yellow guy, though. As I said in the thread title and in the first post, wearing a prosthesis or using crutches is a choice that depends on comfort and functionality... or it should be considered as such. Now how about on of these? :) ;)
  14. LauraG

    PEG-LEG FOR SHOWER

    Welcome aboard, Martin! I couldn't help but notice the photo you posted is of just the masked leg brace. I'm not seeing the socket, so I can't picture how it works for you in the shower. Curiously, Laura
  15. LauraG

    Totally off topic & a bit grisly

    Two years of unpaid bills and her power hadn't been cut? Hmmm.
  16. LauraG

    Happy Birthday

    Sorry! I just saw this! THANK YOU! :D
  17. I think she'll eventually get curious enough about a prosthesis that she'll ask or want to try one out... or not... but the point is she has to know she can choose to wear one or not without being considered "more rehabilitated" or "less rehabilitated", which often equates to "more succesful" and "less succesful" as far as rehab professionals are considered. I think that, of course, is wrong.
  18. I'd like to chime in here with a bit of a devil's advocate position. There's this widespread feeling that any amputee's rehabilitation isn't complete until the person is wearing a prosthesis and, while it's the way to go for a lot of amputees, for some it's not the best choice in terms of function and comfort. I wore a leg for a long time and, to be honest, I never liked it much... but hey, I had to wear it because, well, I just had to. As time passed, the "Oh, I'm in too much of a hurry" and the "I think I feel a blister developing" moments became more and more frequent as an excuse not to wear my leg that day, but it still didn't quite register in my mind that I didn't need an excuse. I could just choose. A few years later I needed a revision and that left me with a fairly high amputation. After a few tries on the new leg, it all "clicked" for me. I could just choose not to wear a leg at all. That's what I did and I don't know that I've felt the need for one more than three or four times since then. I find that I'm a lot faster, a lot less tired, a lot less achy after each day on my crutches than I remember being after a day on my leg. The downside, of course, is that I've had to learn to deal with the hassles of crutches, such as not being able to carry much, the stares I get for being so obviously different, being forced to hop a lot more, etc. The important thing to keep in mind here is that it's a choice. It's a choice every individual has the ability and the right to make, and it's as valid a choice as any other without affecting the "level of rehabilitation" I'm seen as having attained.
  19. LauraG

    Falls and Spills

    I've always showered standing up, but I have a lots of bars in the shower for support. My shower is sort of two separate parts. There's the shower, but sharing the same space behind the glass is a dry area with a bench where I can sit. One thing I don't do is hop in the shower. I will hop to the shower, I will hop from the shower, but that floor is a little more slippery than normal, so I keep a pair of crutches with non-slip tips in the little room in the shower to move around in there. So far, no falls. They should've given me a PhD in falling when I wore a prosthesis, but I don't think I've fallen more than a couple of times since I stopped using one, and it's been a few years now.
  20. LauraG

    Joint damage?

    That's good to know. :) I've always been told hopping's a big no-no, and I repeat it every time I'm asked. In a case of "do as I say, not as I do", though, I hop a lot more than I care to admit. Let's face it. It's much more convenient sometimes. Still, it's nice to know I'm not putting too much stress on the knee. I'm pretty sure I'm going to want to keep it working for a long time. :)
  21. LauraG

    Joint damage?

    I hop just on my toes, my heel never hitting the ground. No huge leaps. I realized a long time ago the trick is to have as much forward motion with as little vertical motion as possible. I'm pretty sure I don't fully straighten my knee, either... so am I doing OK, or am I doing some damage to my knee?
  22. LauraG

    Joint damage?

    What would the "right way" to hop be? That could be, you know, really useful information. :D
  23. LauraG

    Joint damage?

    Hopping... BAD! ...now where'd I leave my crutches? B) :lol:
  24. LauraG

    :::AKA "Trick":::

    Ed, all I can say is: OUCH!!!!!!!!! ...just thinking of it!!
  25. LauraG

    :::Family Matters:::

    This is so true! From what I read, sadly, there's a common thread in the behavior of friends and family members. My husband: He couldn't handle it at all, so he very quickly became my ex-husband. My mother: She still has some pretty serious issues with my amputation. She seems to think that life is somehow punishing her by giving her "perfect little daughter" a visible physical difference. Our relationship has survived this, but just barely. My father: He's learned that ignoring it won't make it go away. Even though he was (understandably) lost at first, he's figured it out along the way and he's helped me through some tough moments. My sister: Ah, my little sister... she's decided it's her job in life to make sure I'm eternally challenged by situations she contrives. She just doesn't know when to stop. I'm sure she does it to "show me" I can do anything I want to, which I mostly can, but she fails to recognize the difference between "Things I can't do" and "Things I don't want to do"... which is why we had a huge fight about the lack of effort I was putting into climbing that artificial rock wall. :P My daughter: Kids are so wonderful! She's never known me with two legs, so it's no big deal, but she's able to compare between "her mommy" and "other kids' mommies", sees the difference... and I always win. :D My friends: Some changed, some left, some got told off, some "got it". The cool thing is I've also made new friends (hint, hint). The thing to understand is people will view things from different angles. Some will see you and think "Oh, wow. If that ever happened to me, I'd rather die" and, being constantly reminded of their own fragility and their fears, will run from you very quickly. Others... a lot of them, unfortunately... will instantly jump into "Oh, you poor cripple" mode. That, obviously, sucks but it's sometimes up to you to change their attitudes. It's never a good thing if they change yours, specially early in your life as an amputee, so you may find yourself avoiding them. Others still manage to get over the shock and will slowly figure out you're still you. Those are the ones you don't want to let go of. :)
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