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pleg

Donkey cart era coming to an end

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... antedilluvian and cruel.

I can assure you that the level of frustration with the prosthetics industry is growing. I am wondering for starters why people who can operate out of their 'garage' are defacto in charge of a health crisis? Why have doctors abrogated responsibility for limb replacement to a bunch of blacksmiths. Do you realize that carpenters, electricians, and plumbers have more education formal and apprenticeship than prosthetic makers? Do you realize that doctors ask these 'blacksmiths' how to write a prescription for a prosthesis? How has this been allowed to develop? SECRETLY that's how, and with great lucre to the prosthetic ogres.

The conventional prosthetic limb is about as

ambulatory as a donkey cart is automatic. It's time to end the misery, pain, injury and death. Well, the dirty game is going to end. I have studies to prove that THEY are terribly WRONG and we are VERY right.

Mack McColl CO-Inventor, J-LEG malcolm_maccoll@hotmail.com

Ph: (780) 448-0567 16728 113 Ave Edmonton AB T5M2X3

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Mark,

Continue your great work and keep us informed. We are at their mercy and have to accept your word and their prosthesis.

You give us knowledge and help so that we can go in as informed consumers and keep up the quest for the best.

Thanks,

Phyllis :wub:

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:lol: Simply put, a paradigm-shift of change will alter the landscape for the world's amputees. Fact, the prosthetics industry in the industrial world manages to 'fit' and service only 25% of leg amputees. My source on that was a prosthetist in Tennesee. My own prosthetist admits a figure of 40%. That is a rate of failure that is frankly incomprehensible.

The majority are too poor and too ravaged by ridiculously overpriced and ludicrously dysfunctional equipment to walk on these limbs (?) (contraptions). The current state of the art will destroy the stump in an agonizing gradualism that wrecks havoc on a human life. But it is lucrative.

As for the developing world, the existing industry manages to help 0 percent. And they want me to shut up and go away, because I can solve this human crisis OVERNIGHT in both worlds. HAHAHAH

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Mack,

So now you post in other forums so that you can bash prosthetics.... show statistics of your leg and how it works and quit bashing the prosthetic world where there are some great and I mean great Prosthetist that charish the work they do for amputees. I for one have one of those Prosthetist.

Brenda

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Well isn't that the beauty of free speech? You can say things on public bulletin boards, things that are patently true, even. Well, now, about the relationship that you currently enjoy with a practitioner of the dark arts. It's okay. It only hurts when you laugh, right? Uh, oh, and by the way, it is not your fault that the limb business is a failure, even though they will blame you for it. I suggest sloughing off their accusations that you don't try hard enough. I suggest trying less hard, meanwhile, until they come up with something that actually performs like a limb replacement, not just a limb chimera

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Mack,

No it doesn't hurt when I laugh. My practitioner makes me state of the art Prosthetics. The limb business is not a failure and nobody blames me for the so called failure and nobody has ever said I don't try hard enough. I use my prosthesis with ease and it feels like an extension of my body rather than a prosthesis that you put on everyday. So this is the last post in response to your negative feelings toward the one thing that helps me on a daily basis. I am very active and I do what people with two legs do and some things I do better. I have been told many times that I'm an inspriation to my community and even one of my local congressmen sent me a personal letter saying that.

Brenda

Proud to be an amputee

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Brenda,

You go girl!!! I dont know who this guy is,, but he seems to be very out of line.. Although we are able to express ourselves freely, I dont believe we should hurt people in the process...

Just my thoughts......

Vicki

And Pleg, by the way...... my sons practitioner is am amputee as well... i cant believe that ALL of them out there are bad....

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Here's my 10 cents worth on the prosthetic industry - don't hold your breath waiting for the next best thing, better to get on with living with what you have and not be too dependent on the technology.

The best developments in prosthetics have usually come about from an amputee getting a good education, developing his or her engineering skills and finding some funding to do research and development - the Flex foot being the major case in point.

Do not rely on a slow moving, complacent prosthetics industry to ffind your replacement leg, it simply won't happen and you can spend a lot of money looking for something that does not exist.

Socket design is the most important and the technology for that has developed even slower than componentry. The Mauch SNS is 35 year old technology etc..

Your best tool is to be an educated consumer, find out all you can, ask the questions, join the various email lists, check out all the amputee sites.

Cheers

IG

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Ian,

Well put.......

Cheers

Brenda a lifetime amputee

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Excellent dialogue there, friend. I wish we could hear more. I feel the same way about seeking a solution. Fact is, seeking, I found. Having found, I feel obliged to share. Thinking most if not all amputees are in the same or similar situations, I expected a warm reception. I have been shocked, dismayed, and baffled to the point of despair at the reaction of industry and end users alike to the thought that mobility issues are equal in importance to aesthetics. Personally, sitting here, I only have to stand up and walk around a while to regain my composure and sense of purpose. I can obtain that level of satisfaction. I wish only that we all could do the same. God bless you all for surviving and striving to live as ably as humanly possible.

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I've seen this rant on several other amputee forums and have several observations to make.

1. I'm sorry that things have not worked well for you pleg, but your invention seems to make you happy? now

2. You would get a much better response if you didn't abuse everybody else who who seem to blame for your problems.

3. If you want to market your product, or at least get people to take you seriously, then you should do so in a slightly less confrontational manner, plus put a link to your (less than inspirational) website, which I did manage to find eventually, in your posts

Just my opinion (my 2ยข worth if you like)

David

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It seems to be a lot more open forum in here. For instance, hardly anyone disagrees with my right to speak openly. I take it as a sign of general strength of character in this 'set'. While Americans and Canadians seem terrfied to admit that the limbs they wear might be lacking in some way, here it is possible to at least make the suggestion.

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Mack

There's an old English saying:

Slowly Slowly catchy monkey!

Only J-leg in in Europe ;)

Demand the right to be unique!

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Good to hear from you, friend. Colin said you had phoned. Things are going well here. I am, more than anything, over the moon with the day-to-day living with the function. My job is going well. I am working on the leg in various directions. Enough about me. And you? I heard they still won't allow you to wear the leg of choice at the office. Care to explain? Otherwise, keep well.

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Hi,

Lost limb (BK) in 1985 - literally had a WOODEN LEG. Revision (amputation) to AK in the 1987. Thirteen (13) legs and years later I still couldn't be properly fit. Came to acceptance that I had to live in wheelchair/crutches. I did so for 8 years and there was nothing I could not do - I was very active.

Then 3 yrs ago I met my first amputee (she has become like a daughter to me), told me of her prosthetist and this is now the 3rd Summer with me walking. Technology had changed so much and continues to.

I am an advocate for myself and let my CP know what I need, what hurts, etc. I find you get what you give. Develop a good relationship with your prosthetist (just like a Doctor) and when they see you are trying hard and doing your homework, they in turn wil be motivated by your enthusiasm

This is why I want prosthetists to come to my Support Group and hear what amputees have to say. They see that after we leave their offices we have an actual life.

Little long winded - sorry.

WA

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I agree whole heartedly. Sockets have improved immensely. I wear a gel-lined ischial containment suction socket, with a TEC custom fit liner. It gives my stump about 1/2 inch of gel to absorb some of the twist and torque. It is a tremendous advance that a very small percent of prosthetic practitioners are able to fit Above Knee. It is a technical conundrum of the industry that advances rarely spread across the industry. There are too few advances and the advances are probably too technical for a vast majority of the prosthetic industry's practitioners. As for other advances, in the methods of walking on limbs, there have been virtually none. Any quick search of a patent office will tell you that much. Nobody is doing anything about the functional limitations. They are barely addressing the issue of weight, drag, and torque on the stump from ungainly appliances that hobble rather than mobilate the individual. They have no solution to the fact that a large chunk of rubber is hardly a replacement for 200-plus foot bones, yards or ligament, and many ounces of strategically placed cartilege. Common knowledge of the modern prosthetic foot is that it functions best as a shoe horse. It is important to look good, but to me it seems more important to look good doing it, and doing it requires function. That is the compromise of our present situation. Let's face it. The one best hope for amputees is the eventual genetic regeneration of lost limbs. Meanwhile, I'll get by on my J-LEG.

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Hi pleg,

I'm new to this forum, but have seen your problem on another, and you do seem to be getting more of a chance on here. That's good, I think you could benefit from being less agressive though. Given the chance, you seem to have things of value to say, however, you damage your cause with all the emotive and confrontational content.

I work in the prosthetics industry and am an AK amputee. I can vouch for the fact that there are many many people within the industry who would be very hurt by your comments, people who see their involvement as their vocation, not just their job.

I am very interested in your j-leg, however, after having looked at the website, I can't find anything that tells me anything about it, only reports from wearers and unsubstantiated testimonials from you. It talks more of how lives are changed than how the change is achieved. Claims by manufacturers are almost always exaggerated, so my sceptisism is alive and well.

Can you do anything about that?

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There is a possibility that I could satisfy your curiosity. Just try one out. Meanwhile, I appreciate your suggestion. It has been a point of interest to me that everything I said was construed as negative, that I was universally ostracized, while the mudslinging done at me received reams of support from others, and none of their vitriolic comments recieved rebuff. It confirmed that old saying, by Samuel Clemens, "You shall know a true genius has come into the world by the fact that all the dunces are in league against him."

Yes, there is altruism (all too altruistic (Nitsche)) in the industry. That doesn't make it right. Lots of altruistic majors and captains sent people out of the trenches into walls of machine gun fire. Were they right or wrong? We say they are neither. We say they were doing their jobs, however, the system was terribly wrong. It ground millions into the earth and we all admit it was wrong (on some levels). But we don't blame the practitioners of the carnage. We blame the system. I say, okay, the practitioners are neither right nor wrong. The system they are installing, the standard to which they all conform, is sending people out of the trenches only to be mowed down on the second or third step. And that is wrong. But the people doing it are neither right nor wrong.

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Heavy man! (said in a sixties cool dude sort of a way)...

...how much would it cost me to try a j-leg? That's the problem isn't it, I'll have to pay to find out.

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Hi 1bl

If I have can offer some in put into this discussion, the J-leg is a different concept to all other A/K prothstesis. By using torque & massed shock absorbtion it generates energy! Very much like a bunny hop on a trials bike! Swing phase knee prothstesis give very little energy back, the wearer continues until the energy runs out usually before they have reached there destination. The concetration used to do this is finominal, the J-leg needs know concentration other than the usual manovering around obsticles.

The mass shock absorbstion allows the wearer to negotiate slopes & uneven ground with complet control, you simply can't fall off!!

Last week I gave a talk with 30 surgeons about attitude to amputation, one of the surgeons, an expert in biomechanic's could see no ill effects from the spring generated by the leg, in fact he felt it had safety & health properties not shown in other legs.

I am showing the limb at the Limbless association AGM in the UK in July, I will gladly answer any questions, I have been a J-leg wearer for 1 year.

Demand the right to be unique! ;)

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I'm just curious. This J-Leg then is only for AK amputees? Does it have a bendable knee? These two things have never been discussed and I think they are very important questions that need answers to if someone was even interested in using it.

Thanks

Brenda

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Cheers Paul, that offers a little more. I'm still unsure of what makes this product different from all others. There are already products on the market that offer torsional as well as telescopic compliance and feet that offer high levels of energy return. Nothing in what you have said offers anything new or innovative. I was hoping, with all the hype, that there was somthing tangible that would make me think 'wow'!

I guess I still have to part with money to find out...or go to the Limbless Association AGM in July.

Thanks again.

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I have no idea how to respond to the question of money. Frankly, by spending all the money, time, and energy that I have spent building this limb all I have managed to achieve is a complete liberation of myself from disability. I think the expense has been worth it. My income level has risen because I'm on the job everyday. My need for unguents, ointments, time off for recovery from bruising, blistering and cysts, has come to a virtual stop. I could actually afford to buy a new limb once in a while now, but I don't need to because this thing is simply failsafe.

It works on BKs. It works on most leg-loss situations. On AKs we employ a STANCE PHASE KNEE, aka, locking knee, aka geriatric knee. At first glimpse, (the one expressing curiosity at the preernatural mobility of the wearer) it resembles a peg leg. Except it weights less than 3 lbs (maximum) and performs like a magic wand on the end of the socket. As for trying it, you are part of the profession. Shouldn't we allow some sort of test drive?

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OK, I'm starting to get a bit more information now. My problem with all this j-leg business is that it still doesn't offer anything new. I am an employee with a full time job, and haven't had a single day off as a result of stump/leg problems or recovery from bruising in twenty years. I don't use "unguents or ointments". I don't get bistering or cysts. My limb functions at least as well as I need it to, I am the limiting factor in the use I can get from my limb, not the other way round. My leg doesn't resemble a peg leg, it is very convincing and fools pretty much everyone.

So you see, I am still at a loss as to what the j-leg offers that I don't already have.

I get all this, and potentially other products if the need arises.... for nothing! I live in the UK and for now at least the NHS provide for me.

Why would I BUY a new limb, or try and justify that limb to my limb provider without some detailed information about it and evidence that it was going to improve my lot?

By the way... my opinion....

The stabilising knee is not the future, biomechanically, it is pretty flawed. It's really stable, reliable and feels reassuring and that's why people like it. The problem is that it allows the residual musculature to relax and will not allow the user to develop that musculature. This restricts their potential to move on to more active pursuits. Locking knees will restrict the amputee.

The whole business of chosing the right limb for an amputee is complex. After all, the most important thing by far, is the fit of the socket, which is at best only assisted by choice of componetry. There is no panacea, to suggest there is, is where you might come up against some walls.

Good luck with the marketing...

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