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pleg

Donkey cart era coming to an end

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Listen, friend. Your opinion means nothing to me. You obviously have no empathy for amputees, if you fail to see the condition of the Majority. It reminds me of a book I once read (while in a hospital recovering from a broken stump that broke under the unforgiving strain of a quad socket). The Confession of Nat Turner. He led the only uprising against slavery in the U.S., and the scene was about 1840. He was meeting with incredible success, until the band of rebels neared a large city with a massive armory. The thing that stopped the rebels, and broke Nat's heart, was the sight of Blacks wearing US Army coats and wigs, blasting into the rush of rebel slaves. The only thing between Nat and success was his own kind. You sir, are a Nat to me.

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Hi Bl1

Try not to look at this subject from your point of view, this forum is about helping others, I know 70 British amputee's under 40 years of age, less than 50% of them use prothstetic's .

Thats why we look at other means in which they can be enabled. There are 7 C-leg wearers in the UK, I take it you are one, under 20 people using the adaptive. Sensor legs are at the front end of technology but are out of reach to many of us.

I myself am testing the Tec liner as an A/K, and having great difficulty with it.

I will share any positive information I can gleen, that is the only way forward for us all, otherwise it will mean those with the biggest cheque book get the new tecnology, as it is in the States.

How is your leg set up? What PCT do you use? What is making your leg work for you?

A problem shared is a problem halved

I use Harol Wood Centre in Essex by the way.

Keep on keeping on ( Chris Moon )

Paul ;)

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To oneblewleg I have to reply to this jargon:

To paraphrase you: The stabilising knee is biomechanically flawed.

My reply, Yes, it is flawed, but in my experience and in the vast majority of those who experience an artificial knee of the swing phase variety I will speak on their behalf A DOOR HINGE IS NOT BIO MECHANICAL! It is indeed mechanical, of a complexity that generally breaks down enough to make an automechanic green with envy.

You did have this part correct about the stabilizing knee: "It's really stable, reliable and feels reassuring and that's why people like it." In fact, I've had prosthetists tell me that when they put people on a peg leg (using a staaaaablizing knee), well, they never see them again.

You said, wearing a stabilizing knee, "The problem is that it allows the residual musculature to relax and will not allow the user to develop that musculature. This restricts their potential to move on to more active pursuits. Locking knees will restrict the amputee." The problem of vascular and muscular condition of stumps in existing systems is PANDEMIC, regardless of the knee. The stumps wither away over time.

Our system, using a stabilizing knee and a rather simple addition of two important elements, BUILDS MUSCLE IN STUMPS, at a dramatic rate, in 100% of cases.

Then you conclude with a vernacular that could only be commonplace in a prosthetic shop: "There is no panacea, to suggest there is, is where you might come up against some walls." To which I reply, I do not have the panacea. I HAVE THE SOLUTION. That's all I've been saying all along.

Thanks for reading and writing.

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This is great... I'm away from the PC for a couple of days and what a joy it is to return. There's quite a lot to deal with here, so I'll try to be as concise as I can. Many assumptions are being made here, it's part of the problem I have found with the typed word as a sole means of communication.

Pleg "Listen, friend. Your opinion means nothing to me." if I've offended you, that wasn't my intention, take what I say EXACTLY as I say it, please don't take any of it personally.

Paul... "this subject" as far as this thread is concerned is the j-leg, not the industry in general. I too have some bad experiences of the industry, the fashioning of a well fitting AK socket seems to be a black art and there is room for much improvement in the industry to make this more common place. My opinions though, are mine, I do not speak for anyone else and I can only speak as I find.

Just out of interest, I've tried several different types of limb and currently I prefer my stabilizing knee for the security it offers, I don't have any hankering for high activity and my job doesn't require me to walk a great deal. Weren't expecting that were you?

What's a PCT?

P.S. I couldn't think of a good way of mis-spelling pleg, so I didn't bother :)

Roll on the forum...

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oneglueleg

Common on, they're just nick names afterall. Why don't sockets fit? Why does one fit then become unfit? Why does it fit one day and feel sloppy the next and feel way too tight a week later, only to fall off the day after that? It's called Volume Change. The problem is that the muscular and vascular condition of a stump encased in a socket attached to an appliance the 'does the walking', rendering the stump nothing but a 'residue', something to attach the appliance to, and something doomed to wither away. Generally, after about ten limbs fit with ever shrinking sockets, the amputee has run out of room for 'walking'.

Well, the best news about the system we have designed is that the stump has the opposite reaction. Rather than enervation, the stump rejuvenates, grows strong, muscular, and healthy. IT has happened in 100% of cases of people wearing this system. If all the convenience, stability, mobility, energy, and enjoyment from walking isn't enough, the system restores health, mitigates against the permanent damage of amputation. Someday this will all be proved. Amputees anxiously await this day.

P.S. I don't take any one this personally.

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plog

Can you describe the socket? Is it adjustable? what material is it made from? Is it derived from a cast? What exactly is it that encourages the stump to grow stronger? How does it fit whatever the size of your stump that day? Questions, questions...

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LOL Uh, it's plague, not ploug

The system retains simplicity for a few reasons and benefits. First of all, when I brought the idea of a mechanical pylon system to my partner, I asked for 'a wand' on the end of my socket. After 25 years as amputee, my stump had lost practically all of its mass. The purpose of that appendage had turned to entropy. It was just the part of me that was dying sooner than the rest. More than once, however, the bone exploded into osteomyletis and I ended up in a major surgery scenario, with high-power antibiotic therapy to follow the disbride. My stump measured 16" at the hip, and 11" at the distal end of a 13" long transfemoral residual limb. The stump bone was gradually curved back after the two decades of force-marching the knee into a locking position for the agonizing heel plant (And don't forget to THINK ABOUT EVERY STEP)

My stump-side ischium was flattening out from the pounding on a shelf that constituted each step wearing a quad socket. (Even to this day, very few prosthetists can fit an ischial containment socket.) All the advances in fitting sockets are important, but far from universal in their distribution of availability. Even when I switched to an ischial containment socket made by a more contemporary practitioner of prosthetics, the stump continued to shrink, perhaps even faster.

Then I invented the J-LEG Enabler, which has performed like an exercise machine in building stump muscle on every wearer. That is, no matter what type of socket they are wearing, the system we supply creates a very dynamic interface between the pelvis and the ground, an interface that the stump interprets as 'inviting'. The 'muscular' spring, calibrated to a person's weight, provides a natural roll over that absorbs and returns the body weight to the other lateral. The 360 degree free rotattional pedestal foot removes the constant snake biting activity of skin against immutable socket when the static foot is firmly (and undesirably) planted. The device. correctly and indeed precisely tuned to a body's weight, assembled into a super-light tubular system, with super-light pedestal foot elements, actually simulates the human leg in motion, while creating an aerobically healthy atmosphere that exercises the stump.

And my stump dimensions today? 21 inches at the top and 13.5 inches at the bottom. In fact, prosthetists would make way more money installing our system because they make most of their income off sockets. Our system enables them to refit sockets without requiring expensive componentry, and refit sockets to BIGGER HEALTHIER stumps for many more years. (YEARS> we have over 15 -man-years of experience on J-LEG Enabler wearers without one mechanical failure, and almost negligible days off for stump breakdown. And every single wearer is building muscle under healthier skin.

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plig...

thanks for that, I'm learning more all the time. Are you doing anything to develop the idea, such as using a cosmesis, and/or a version with a foot so that your 'average amputee' will be able to wear it with shoes?

These seem to be the two most obvious stumbling blocks (I've just realised what I've typed.... I've left the words in, because they made me laugh, sorry...).

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Hi 1Bl

A P C T (Personal Care Trust)

Enjoying the imput, you asking very relivent questions, If :D it helps I see the J-leg as an enabler a empowering tool. Its basic, simple, light, but it works!

For me aestetics are not important, I look for funtion & comfort, but i do understand cosmesis is very important to some people.

I live in the present tense, J-leg today who knows tomorrow......

Let the sun shine on your face, you will never see a shadow

Paul

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I am with Paul in those remarks. I live in the context of the possible. Right now, adding any of the existant so-called foot appendages will remove a large measure of the function that I enjoy. I will not be adding a different foot element than we have already designed until it adds or augments the function of this system. I don't need a shoe horse. I'll go without the conventional notion of a foot until convention delivers foot function. Appearence is nothing to me. I went through 20 years of trying and failing to look normal. Now I walk normal and look extraordinary doing it. Nobody has ever come up to me with anything but admiration for my level of mobility. I take the compliments for what they are, the truth.

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plug,

That is admirable, however strange ;) .

I can't speak for most amputees obviously, but I'm guessing they want both the hassle free, pain free, reliable limb you seem to offer AND something that looks a bit more 'leg like' than a peg leg with no foot or cosmesis. This shouldn't be beyond the wit of man.

I only suggest that you're j-leg would be more successful in the market, if it were not for the fact you don't consider things others have genuine concerns about.

Perhaps you consider everyone else should think like you, and perhaps you're right, but that belief may ultimately prevent many amputees benefiting from your device, and maybe even cause it's demise.

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Perhaps you should think about this. How much of the dialogue you send to me contains the constant refrain that I should somehow think like you . Sod off, okay? I don't want you to tell me how to think, any more than I want to spend my golden years in a wheel chair. Think for yourself. Decide how you should think and feel and look. But please, remember this, I don't care what you think. I really don't. I don't care if you think it's real important to walk around with a foot growing out the side of your head. That's your business. Right?

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... antedilluvian and cruel.

I can assure you that the level of frustration with the prosthetics industry is growing. I am wondering for starters why people who can operate out of their 'garage' are defacto in charge of a health crisis? Why have doctors abrogated responsibility for limb replacement to a bunch of blacksmiths. Do you realize that carpenters, electricians, and plumbers have more education formal and apprenticeship than prosthetic makers? Do you realize that doctors ask these 'blacksmiths' how to write a prescription for a prosthesis? How has this been allowed to develop? SECRETLY that's how, and with great lucre to the prosthetic ogres.

The conventional prosthetic limb is about as

ambulatory as a donkey cart is automatic. It's time to end the misery, pain, injury and death. Well, the dirty game is going to end. I have studies to prove that THEY are terribly WRONG and we are VERY right.

Mack McColl CO-Inventor, J-LEG malcolm_maccoll@hotmail.com

Ph: (780) 448-0567 16728 113 Ave Edmonton AB T5M2X3

Blimey! Not happy today then?!

Now I know you're serious, you've stopped mis-spelling oneblueleg.

You crack me up... you slag off an entire industry and all within it, then offer yourself as the answer to everyones prayer, without any evidence that you are any more qualified than those you criticise, and then totally loose it with the only person on here that's questioning anything you say (and asking relevant questions out of genuine interest, by the way). If you would like more people to benefit from your j-leg you may have to try and understand the way others think. At the very least, you should respect other views and not just lapse into abuse. Whoops, I'm telling what to do again.... sorry.

It seems you are obsessed with looking different and that you are offended by anyone trying to suggest that may not be the majority view among amputees. What does everyone else think?

If I've offended you, that's a shame, it wasn't intentional and I am still enjoying this thread.

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Hmm...I think it's time to kiss and make up now! :D Of course nobody in this world is going to have the perfect leg, unfortunately. We need to be grateful that there's even something out there for us to use and walk with even if it isn't pretty. Anything is better then not being able to walk again. I understand comfort is very important when walking with a prosthesis, and I've had my share of trouble, but that was because I was seeing a prosthetist who really didn't know what the hell he was doing. Anyway, I got rid of him and I'm seeing someone else who is really great! The J-Leg definently sounds interesting and I would love to see how it works. As time goes on, technology only gets better.

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So it all boils down to research and development.... Look at prosthetics from 1968 which is when I got my first leg and then look at what we have today. I say that prosthetics has come a long way in 35 years. I know that I'm happy with what I am wearing today vs what I was wearing last year.

Brenda

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Look, I admit the J-LEG Enabler is ugly. So too was the first automobile when parked beside the Royal Coach, ugly. That happens to be a matter of fact, obvious to everyone including me. But having lost a leg, I need more than an illusion of function, an illusion of wholeness that presents itself as part of me yet falls terribly short of working like me. I need more than to fool everybody. And never was anybody fooled. It has been my personal experience from wearing this leg that people are far sooner 'fooled' about my disability because the leg I wear is high performance, it delivers Full Function,, good as anybody on the street. They were never fooled by limbs that failed to deliver the necessary function.

Example: One night early in my time wearing this limb I was on a hiking and backpacking excursion in British Columbia. I visited a Native camp in the Lillooet Valley. The chief invited me to a midnight 'sweat'. We walked the dark trail in the deep valley, and I, the one legged man, was the only one who did not fall on the way to the sweat lodge. Now THAT is function.

Two very able-bodied friends of mine challenged me to a sprint down Jasper Avenue in Edmonton one summer afternoon. Neither one could beat me over the course of two long city blocks.

I have worn the J-LEG Enabler through three winters in northern Canada. I have yet to fall down on the ice that is a constant in my living environment, a constant that used to be endless torment, and is now nothing. I have many more anecdotes, and others wearing it attest to the same return to function. That's all I am talking about. I am telling people that function is missing but available. It is far from pretty, but my health and well being are worth the sacrifice of ending the foolery. It is not enough in society to fool everyone. I have come to understand distinctly that running with the herd is the only way to stay in the herd.

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I humbly apologize for raising offense and alarm. I am serious about discussing a paradigm shift. This form of activity in the function of leg MUST begin somewhere. You may or may not agree, but the scientific community that examines prosthetic leg function sees the design as fundamentally flawed. A study was conducted of the human leg in motion back in 1997. Several laboratories cooperated independent of each other, all existing mechanical devices were examined (including military, industrial, toy, and leg prosthetic manufacture), and the only device in existence that resembled a human leg in motion was far from a conventional leg prosthesis. Conventional leg prostheses were dropped from the device list in every lab.

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There's no need for you to apologize, no offence was taken or alarm caused. Your strength of feeling is commendable, a paradigm shift will not happen without some fire in someones heart.

Now, at the risk of being shot down in flames (I have been listening, honestly) is there a possiblity that in the future a foot or some sort of shoe devise may be able to be fitted, or does this affect the function so fundamentally as to make this impossible? You mentioned earlier that there is free rotation, I can only imagine this is why it's a problem. Also, at 'heel' contact, does the leg shorten? if so roughly by how much? I hope you don't mind my asking, I'm trying to imagine wearing it, sort of like a virtual trial.

By the way, hopefully Nicole, there's no need to kiss and make up, I don't swing that way ;)

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"Bloke" must be an english term. Do you have the accent to go along with it? Oh...you can swing my way if you'd like. I may be missing part of my leg but I'm still the 3 S's...single, sweet and sexy :lol:

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In the AK situation the maximum travel is 4". Correct calibration results in between .5 inch and 1.5 inch travel, depending how hard you are walking. I only ever collapse the full four inches when I jump off at least four foot height and plant both legs with equal strength. The BK situation has a maximum 2" travel.

You are correct about the rotational pedestal foot. It rotates freely, two agreeable polymers allow this to occur without lubrication. It precludes a shoe horse and shoe scenario. I get one primary reaction about the foot from the line of sight in the herd. They look at the leg, the pedestal, then my eyes, and they smile.

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Odd psychology to the amputee existence. Is it more important to look normal or act normal? Well, the question never arose before an alternative was presented. Everybody who saw this J-LEG Enabler first hand rejected it out of hand. Those who were barely convinced enough to try it will never take it off. This schism is a mystery. I suspect the psychology is rooted in the prosthetic industry's failure to manufacture function, therefore, the entire sales pitch to recovering amputees regards appearence. The argument of function is moot, an unapproachable discussion

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