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pleg

Donkey cart era coming to an end

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Helloooo Nicole! Suddenly this thread takes a turn! Yes 'bloke' is an English thing.

Thanks for all that pleg. Yes... the psychology of the amputee experience, you open up a whole new area that is inextricably linked to the j-leg, but which is a massive subject in it's own right.

It's true to say though that amputees may have as many concerns about appearance as function, who's to say that is wrong for them. Although, those of us who have function and fit know otherwise.

I must take issue with you about 'the entire sales pitch' regarding appearance. I work in the industry, as I've said before and I'm contantly amazed that we DON'T consider appearance. We ONLY think of function, if an amputee wants looks we provide foam for covering the components. The only difference from yourself is that we always assume they will want a foot, 'that's the way'. That's the bit I know you want to break, I can't imagine it happening though, and I don't think it's the industry, the designers, the companies.... it's the amputees who won't want it in the numbers required to make that paradigm shift.

Videos people doing the amazing things you talk of doing would be really interesting.

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Okay, I admit I haven't followed the technicalities so excuse my ignorance, but I have a question: Is the main advantage of your J-LEG to be gained in the components below the socket? i.e. Is the socket built in the same manner as other sockets?

Being of the female persuasion looks are incredibly important to me, and as such the idea of not having 'normal looking' foot is not one I would find easy to get used to.

I have always found my prostheses to be very acceptable, and usually most complaints are when the socket is not fitting properly.......something which is always rectifiable after a couple of visits to the clinic.

Good thread this, am enjoying the debate. ;)

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Mandy,

From what I've been reading it looks like the socket is the same design the only difference is that it has a spring loaded end with no foot on it (for better terms looks like a pogo stick). I hear you about cosmetics but they are not a concern with me but I want a foot so I can do a heal toe strike I think that is very important. Plus I like to wear shoes can't imagine wearing one shoe on the left foot and none on the right. Besides if the spring is the key to this leg there are quite a few shock absorbers out there today that bring energy return and therefor your residual limb benefits from it.

I am wearing the VASS Harmony system and you know I have increased in volume especially in the distal end. I have been in the new leg for about 8 weeks and find this is really the best leg I've ever had. I even tried to go back to my pin system and it feels to much like a yoyo so I can't even wear it anymore.

Brenda

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In many ways I agree with what you say Brenda, couldn't have said it much better. I've derived the same as you about the j-leg.

Mandy, I don't think you have to qualify your interest in looks by saying you're of the female persuasion, it's about descretely being an amputee, or shouting in peoples faces about being an amputee, and I think most prefer the former.

It's great getting more people into this thread, pleg and me were getting a little lonely!

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Looks are important, but so is function. People who lose arms often get two pieces of prosthetic equipment including a cosmetic hand that interchanges with a hook. Why shouldn;t we have the same option on a leg? When you're working in a yard or a shop (or most office jobs for that matter) or backpacking in the woods, nobody sees you anyway. Shouldn't you have option to function at a higher level?

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I agree, it's about cost though isn't it. Most of us need to compromise on one that will perform at all the levels we want. That's the real problem. If we could have the best limb for every activity and need, we'd all have a few legs I reckon.

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I'm not saying I value looks over comfort....far from it. The priority should always lie with comfort and function, and I could even handle no cosmetic cover (I tend to wear trousers mostly anyway), but the foot would be a problem for me. The foot I have at the moment (Flex-Foot) does all I need it to do and I can wear 2 shoes of varying heights. function & looks in one ;)

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Well, to each their own. I have to say that I can make no real argument for the lack of foot without sounding foolish. I have been an amputee for 28 years. I guess I am arguing mainly for a compromise limb, low-cost, extraordinarily efficient and healthy, that fails all tests of cosmetic demand. It really is lacking conventional form. But I must insist that it performs at a 'breakthrough' level. It really does restore leg function and stump health. But the free-rotating foot precludes a shoe and the locomotive aspect can only be obtained from the locked knee. I am not going to spring down a steep hill on a door hinge. I used to try, once, maybe twice, and then I only ran in my dreams for 25 years.

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Money is the route of all evil, if only we could all experience what you have. I just wouldn't be able to justify it to my limb provider and can't afford it myself (that's an assumption, as I don't know how much it costs).

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What is the average price of a limb in the US? My leg cost around £5500 (private clinic), and it wasn't even the highest tech option available. Now if I convert that figure to USD it comes to $8746 which is quite a bit higher than $1k-2k! :wub: So on the face of it, your J-LEG seems reasonable.....or is that Canadian Dollars? (in which case its even cheaper)

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Careful when comparing prices. I suspect your £5500 includes casting, fitting, follow up etc. you're paying for the skill of the prosthetist, technicians appointments etc. as well as the hardware and materials. I think Mack is refering to the hardware alone. If anyone is charging you £5500 for hardware alone go somewhere else, you're being had! The very latest computer controlled limbs cost less than £5500!

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A leg made in the us can start as low as $6,000 depending on the components that the person picks and can escalate up to around $50,000 and that is for a high tech leg like the C-Leg. The cost for prosthetics has risen over the years because of research and development, patents and insurance on the patents etc. My first leg back in 1968 cost a whopping $500 and my current leg was $16,000 because of the high tech compontents that I picked. Most insurance companies will pay a good majority of it which helps the amputee.

I wonder since I'm a BK is that $1,000 for the foot or $1,000 for the socket and foot and could I use the socket that I currently use or do I have to have another one fabricated? And also why would I pay $1,000 for a leg that has NO FOOT..... I'm sorry but I like having a foot under me...

Brenda

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Most of the $50000 isn't the componentry, and it isn't to do with patents and R&D, it's profit and prosthetic support i.e. labour for the consultants, prosthetists and technicians.

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Oneblueleg,

Yes and then there is the amount that goes the the CP and his tech etc ect etc...... I was just giving a general break down not a complete one... sorry.

Brenda

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this dislogue needs a shake up. Walking is impossible on the existing technology. What amputees need is something different. I am almost sorry I ever brought it up, except the truth is less painful from my point of view than from any other amputees. I thought this is something worth sharing. I no longer think so.

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this dislogue needs a shake up. Walking is impossible on the existing technology. What amputees need is something different. I am almost sorry I ever brought it up, except the truth is less painful from my point of view than from any other amputees. I thought this is something worth sharing. I no longer think so.

Jesus! You really think alot of yourself don't you!

"Walking is impossible on the existing technology"... obviously rubbish.

"I am almost sorry I ever brought it up"... I don't think so.

"... the truth is less painful from my point of view than from ANY other amputees"... you can only possibly speak for yourself, don't make assumptions about me.

"I thought this is something worth sharing. I no longer think so."... I don't believe you.

"this dislogue needs a shake up"... you got it! (I guess you meant dialogue, or was that Freudian)

Pity you couldn't have confirmed what the price included.

You like this stirring things up don't you?

(Hope you've had a good holiday by the way)

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Yeehaa the angry man is in the house! :lol:

Wow, all these years and I thought I was walking.....man what a bummer to find out its impossible. Do you think Brenda has been dreaming of her races instead of actually running them?

Actually I see you are trying to start the debate all over again but you've said nothing new........

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The strange thing is the j-leg enabler does do what Mack preaches!! It does give mobility. I should know I wear it, howevever that does'nt mean that other prothstetics don't do the same thing for other people.

we are all different and require different aids!

I recently got married, used a swing phase knee for the day, danced all night on the j-leg!

Keep an open mind people I do, I know crutch users that have more mobility then any prothstetic wearer? Who's to say they've got it wrong!

This is not an excact science, wear what makes you feel good, at the end of the day be happy, have a great life...........and enjoy it!!! I do

Demand the right to be unique! ;)

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Hey there blue leg. I understand. Let me say the summer has been very nice in Edmonton. I've been busy writing a lot of stories for the two newspapers that I work for, and had no holidays. But I have been enjoying the summer. As a matter of fact, my computer's power supply crashed so I needed a replacement machine. Now I'm back to computing and so on.

My problem with conventional limbs stems from the intrinsic weakness of my stump, the result of the accident and subsequent surgeries that patched together a femur. Now, out of 25 years as an amputee, 7 of those were spent on crutches. My stump kept breaking down. In 1995 the stump exploded into osteomyletis and infection nearly killed me. I went without limb for another three years. Since wearing this system of J-LEG my stump has grown in muscle and health. I am not threatened by infection. I take no time off, ever, for recovering. I walk equal speed and strength to any able bodied person.

Am I saying this properly? I wear it because it works, for me, and thanks for all the criticism :ph34r::ph34r:

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I understand pleg, you've really achieved something. You've got over problems that many people in your position would just have accepted. I've enjoyed our 'debates' on here and hope others have been able to take something from it as well.

Good luck in the future, not that you need it, I think people largely make their own luck, and you make plenty by the sound of it. We all do what we can with what we've got, and some do more.

Some of us are too accepting, so keep demanding better products and services, the world needs people like you.

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