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Peggy

"no excuses today- not even........"

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Guest bearlover

When we are out eating the waiter or waitress will are "are you still working on that" :o Meaning are you still eating? For some reason I hate that expression about eating!

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Most waiters and waitresses watch until you've just taken a big mouthful to ask "And how is everthing?"

Most of them in this little town know not to do that to me. Anymore!! B) :ph34r::angry::ph34r:

Sparky

If I didn't know better I would think you were from Alice Springs.

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Sparky

If I didn't know better I would think you were from Alice Springs.

:o ...I've been there and they sure don't talk like that :lol:

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Hello Sparky

Was all of that what you call "Cockney"? I remember when I was in London in 1957, some people, (mostly cab drivers), would go on and I could barely understand a word that they were saying. It was similar to the cajun talk down in Louisiana.

I know that it was supposed to be English, but talked with a totally different accent and inflection. Sounded like a combination of Scotch, English and Irish.

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Hi Jim, Cockney is east London. A true Cockney is someone born within the sound of Bow Bells. (St Mary-le-Bow Church in Cheapside, London). Cockney Rhyming Slang phrases are derived from taking an expression which rhymes with a word and then using that expression instead of the word. For example the word "look" rhymes with "butcher's hook". In many cases the rhyming word is omitted - so you won't find too many Londoners having a "bucher's hook" at this site, but you might find a few having a "butcher's".

English--------------Rhymes with---------------Cockney

  1. Feet------Plates of meat-------------Plates
  2. Teeth-----Hampstead Heath---------Hampsteads
  3. Legs------Scotch eggs-----------------Scotches
  4. Eyes------Mince pies-------------------Minces
  5. Arms------Chalk Farms---------------Chalk Farms
  6. Hair--------Barnet Fair------------------Barnet
  7. Head-------Loaf of bread---------------Loaf
  8. Face-------Boat race--------------------Boat race
  9. Mouth------North and south----------North and south

Add all that to their accent and you get what sounds like a combination of Scotch, English and Irish.

Derbyshire like most counties in England can be recognised by their dialect, dialect can change from village to village.

This is something my wife oftens says to me.

AHMGOIN'AHT, THEEDINNERSTINTDOG.

Translation below

I am going out your dinner is in the dog.

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Aside from New England, New Jersey and Cajun, we also have Boontling invented over 100 years ago in Boonville, California. Although it sounds like something you might understand, just about the only people who really understand it live in Boonville.

A few examples are:

fair and right a person - one who would give or lend money.

haireem - a dog.

hooter - a loud laugher.

killing snake - to work very hard at something: One would say "He's tackling that job as if he were killing snake."

nettied - all dressed up; wearing an abundance of lace, ribbons, and finery.

oshtook - a person with one eye: a Native American word.

pack-em-out-billies - dirty socks.

Wheeler - a fit; a tantrum.

B) B) B) B)

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OK, here's a story in Boontling. I'm not a native speaker but I'll have the American English translation in a day or two.

BOONTLING VERSION

Brightlighter 'n' eeld'm piked straightnecky moshe from Frisk to fogeater region for buckeyin' on thribble dee, greymatterin' to seep fratty in the Land of the Beeson Tree on the pike. Moshed on Boont, needeekin' 'n' neeshyin', deekin' on frattey nooks.

Pikin' on Mason-Dixon, 'n' KEEBARL! Moshe piked shaggish. "Serowlsh!" springkneed Brightlights, 'n' shied pikin' for parkin' on muzz creek. Loglifter dee before, 'n' ground was neeble. Brightlights deeked on moshe, 'n' harped, "Tire's strung, moshe's stook," on eeld'm. "I'll pike to Boont, deek for a walter levi, 'n' harp dear Charlie on a de-arkin' moshe."

Boonter piked up to harp or help. The bahl Boonter japed brightlighters to Boont with beamer 'n' bohoik, 'n' when Brightlights reached for his ose pocket, Boonter shied before Brights could harp on higgin'.

Brightlighter teleef'ned de-arker, 'n' piked to Buckhorn gorm 'n' horn sale. Osed down in hornin' region, 'n' harped on the kimmie for dubs Boont steinbers. Horned a slib, then a rauncher, 'n' with socker almittey, harped "Eee-Tah! Boont region frattey's bahl, but Boont steinber's bahlness! " Eeld'm harped "Yibe, neepikin' neemer." They higged on a sluggin' nook at hewtle, 'n' shied briney region for Boont Region.

Thribful dees, piked 'n' deeked on bahl Boont region, hornin' 'n' gormin', higgin' 'n' harpin', burlin' 'n' bohoikin'.

Sundee, as ol' sol piked to dusties, shied Boont Region, moshe re-cloddied. "We'll pike back," kimmie harped on eeld'm. "Earth," dame harped back, "Boont's wee 'n' ridgy, but plenty bahl."

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Gil, I'd forgotten all about Boontling... thanks for the reminder! I've only actually heard it spoken a couple of times in TV stories about the Boonvile folks... but I've read some about it and it truly does seem to be an "independent" dialect.

Even regional accents are interesting.... my sister and I both have noticeable drawls -- real Southern drawls that have been known to convince real Southerners that we're from their part of the country. I have no idea where the drawl came from, as neither of our parents had it, and it's also not especially Southern-Californian-sounding. My northern Minnesota cousins tease me relentlessly about the drawl... and I tease them about the fact that each and every one of them sounds far more Canadian than Minnesotan! On the other hand, my Canadian aunt has completely acclimated to her adopted state, and sounds more Californian than I do.

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Gil, you tackled that as if you were killing snake :D

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I'll wait for the translation, Gil. I got a headache trying to read it.. :blink:

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:huh::blink: I'm with Marcia on this one......eish!

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I'll wait for the translation, Gil. I got a headache trying to read it.. :blink:

Ok, Ok here it is. Remember that Boontling is highly allusional, so the English version is a bit longer.

ENGLISH VERSION

A man and his wife who lived in the city were driving their BMW through Anderson Valley, from San Francisco to the Mendocino coast, on a three day weekend, for a little rest and relaxation. They figured they would pass through Anderson Valley to sample some of the local wines on the drive. They drove through Boonville without a glance and stopped for nothing, intent on finding the wineries and their tasting rooms.

They were about three miles west of Boonville, not quite to Philo, when BANG! The car slewed about and became difficult to handle. "Damn!" yelled the man, as he pulled off the road to park on the shoulder. There had been a torrential rainstorm the day before, which left the ground very soft and muddy. The man got out and examined the car for damage, and reported to his wife that not only was the tire flat, but that they were pretty well stuck in the mud. "I'll walk back to the small town we just passed through, Boonville, and look for a pay phone. I can call for a tow truck and ask them to come help us out."

Just then a fellow pulled over to talk to the couple in trouble, and see if he could help. He was a Boonville resident, and a good, kind man, and he gave the visitors a ride back into Boonville with a bright smile and a good natured laugh. Upon being dropped off in Boonville, the city fellow began to reach for his back pocket, where he kept his wallet. The local, realizing what the man intended to do, quickly excused himself and drove away before the tourist could even offer to pay for the ride they had received.

The couple found a pay phone, and called for the local tow truck, then walked to the Buckhorn Saloon to wait for its arrival. They sat at the bar, and the man called to the bartender for two of the local brews. He took a small sip of the beer, then a long draught, and with a resounding belch, the man exclaimed "Wow! The wines of Anderson Valley are good, but this beer is the best I've ever tasted! " His wife tried her ale, and agreed. "Yeah, you're right. Know what? Let's not drive any further. Let's stay right here." They changed their weekend plan then and there, forgot about the coast, and rented a room at the local hotel.

For the whole three days they wandered around Boonville, enjoying the beautiful scenery, eating and drinking at the restaurants, shopping and talking, making love and laughing.

On Sunday evening, as the sun was setting, they left Boonville, headed for home, with a new tire on their BMW, to replace the flat. We'll be back," he said to his wife. "Definitely," she replied. "It's small and rustic, but it's a great place."

So, that's the story. B) B) :blink::ph34r:

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We do forget, don't we about all the regional dialects and slang expressions.

As members of this forum we are "forced" to use English and most of us avoid local usage, since we don't know if anyone else will understand those terms.

In many ways it's a great "leveler" and allows us to communicate more directly.

A number of years ago I was in Paris on a Sunday and had gone to the Louvre, since it was free on Sunday.

This was in early February and as I walked back along the Seine I met a couple.

The man asked me (in French) how far it was to the Louvre. I replied (in French) that it was just a kilometer.

He and his wife had a hurried, but quiet conversation and the he asked me where I was from.

I replied that I was an American.

He was visibly relieved and in his best English informed me that he and his wife were from the country and were concerned that everyone in Paris would speak with my accent. We all had a good laugh.

:D :D :D :D :P

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Marcia

I think you'll recognize these:

Southernisms

1.) Only a true Southerner knows the difference between a hissie fit and a conniption, and that you don't "HAVE" them, --

you "PITCH" them.

2.) Only a true Southerner knows how many fish, collard greens, turnip greens, peas, beans, etc. make up "a mess."

3.) Only a true Southerner can show or point out to you the general direction of "yonder."

4.) Only a true Southerner knows exactly how long "directly" is - as in: "Going to town, be back directly."

5.) All true Southerners, even babies, know that "Gimme some sugar" is not a request for the white, granular sweet substance that sits in a pretty little bowl on the middle of the table.

6.) All true Southerners know exactly when "by and by" is.

They might not use the term, but they know the concept well.

7.) Only a true Southerner knows instinctively that the best gesture of solace for a neighbor who's got trouble is a plate of hot fried chicken and a big bowl of cold potato salad. (If the neighbor's trouble is a real crisis, they also know to add a large banana puddin'!)

8.) Only true Southerners grow up knowing the difference between "right near" and "a right far piece." They also know that "just down the road" can be 1 mile or 20.

9.) Only a true Southerner both knows and understands the difference between a redneck, a good ol' boy, and po' white trash.

10.) No true Southerner would ever assume that the car with the flashing turn signal is actually going to make a turn.

11.) A true Southerner knows that "fixin'" can be used as a noun, a verb, or an adverb.

12.) Only a true Southerner knows that the term "booger" can be a resident of the nose, a descriptive, as in "that ol' booger," a first name or something that jumps out at you in the dark and scares you senseless.

13.) Only true Southerners make friends while standing in lines. We don't do "queues", we do "lines," and when we're "in line," we talk to everybody!

14.) Put 100 true Southerners in a room and half of them will discover they're related, even if only by marriage.

15.) True Southerners never refer to one person as "y'all."

16.) True Southerners know grits come from corn and how to eat them.

17.) Every true Southerner knows tomatoes with eggs, bacon, grits, and coffee are perfectly wonderful; that redeye gravy is also a breakfast food; and that fried green tomatoes are not a breakfast food.

18.) When you hear someone say, "Well, I caught myself lookin' .. ," you know you are in the presence of a genuine Southerner!

19.) Only true Southerners say "sweet tea" and "sweet milk." Sweet tea indicates the need for sugar and lots of it - we do not like our tea unsweetened. "Sweet milk" means you don't want buttermilk.

20.) And a true Southerner knows you don't scream obscenities at little old ladies who drive 30 MPH on the freeway. You just say, "Bless her heart" and go your own way.

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Those were wonderful, Gil. I always say tol my grandchildren, "give me some sugar" or "can I have some sugar". I never thought about others not knowing what "sugar" is.

I know you won't believe this, but I have pitched a few hissie fits in my time... :P

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We do forget, don't we about all the regional dialects and slang expressions.

As members of this forum we are "forced" to use English and most of us avoid local usage, since we don't know if anyone else will understand those terms.

In many ways it's a great "leveler" and allows us to communicate more directly.

A number of years ago I was in Paris on a Sunday and had gone to the Louvre, since it was free on Sunday.

This was in early February and as I walked back along the Seine I met a couple.

The man asked me (in French) how far it was to the Louvre. I replied (in French) that it was just a kilometer.

He and his wife had a hurried, but quiet conversation and the he asked me where I was from.

I replied that I was an American.

He was visibly relieved and in his best English informed me that he and his wife were from the country and were concerned that everyone in Paris would speak with my accent. We all had a good laugh.

:D :D :D :D :P

Gil, reminds me of my attempts at French. When I have been on holiday in France I have always managed to make myself understood – especially in restaurants.

Moi : Garçon avez-vous les jambes de grenouille ?

Garçon : Oui monsieur

Moi : bien le bond dans la cuisine et me reçoit un steak rare moyen

Translated

Me: Waiter do you have frog's legs?

Waiter: Yes sir

Me: well hop into the kitchen and get me a medium rare steak

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I know you won't believe this, but I have pitched a few hissie fits in my time... :P

Marcia

I can believe, but I'm sure they were in a good cause.

What I can't get across to people is that grits are for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Breakfast A bowl of grits with milk and sweetener (you choose)

Lunch Grits as a side dish, with either butter or gravy (red-eye is best)

Dinner Same as lunch, maybe with different accouterments

Of course, Breakfast is still "Breakfast", but Lunch is really "Dinner" and Dinner is really "Supper".

In the Florida Keys, the poorer people are referred to as "Grits and Grunts", since that is supposedly their staple food. Grunts are small to medium sized reef fish that will bite on a bare hook, so they're easy to catch. After cleaning they are cooked in a pressure cooker that makes all the little bones edible (and there are a LOT of little bones). I've seen pressure cookers on campfires??

Believe it or not, I've seen grits on the menu in Minneapolis, MN. I sorta shied away from them, mainly cause I didn't think Norwegians could do grits properly.

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Here is a funny or what I call a dumb A@# move. I had a revision last week, so obviously the leg I went down in was useless. Mark was flying home first so he took all the things he thought I would not need. So I am getting all my stuff togather and I am looking all over he$% for my right shoe. I called home I said, "hey Mark by chance did you take my right shoe home?" He says, "Oh my gosh I never thought of it?" I said, "I guess you thought will she is here for left limb revision they would through in a free right leg amp?" SO I got a house slipper from the gift store to get through the airport.

Kinda funny now, wasn't at the time.

Skully Cat

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:P :P

Was it a pink fluffy house slipper?

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1. How Do You Catch a Unique Rabbit?

Unique up on it.

2. How Do You Catch a Tame Rabbit?

Tame way.

3. How Do Crazy People Go Through The Forest?

They take the psycho path

4. How Do You Get Holy Water?

You boil the hell out of it

5. What Do Fish Say When They Hit a Concrete Wall?

Dam!

6. What Do Eskimos Get From Sitting On The Ice too Long?

Polaroid's

7. What Do You Call a Boomerang That Doesn't work?

A stick

8. What Do You Call Cheese That Isn't Yours?

Nacho cheese.

9. What Do You Call Santa's H! elper s?

Subordinate clauses.

10. What Do You Call Four Bullfighters In Quicksand?

Quattro sinko.

11. What Do You Get From a Pampered Cow?

Spoiled milk.

12. What Do You Get When You Cross a Snowman With a Vampire?

Frostbite.

13. What Lies At The Bottom Of The Ocean And Twitches?

A nervous wreck.

14. What's The Difference Between Roast Beef And Pea Soup?

Anyone can roast beef.

15. Where Do You Find a Dog With No Legs?

Right where you left him.

16. Why Do Gorillas Have Big Nostrils?

Because they have big fingers.

17. Why Don't Blind People Like To Sky Dive?

Because it scares the dog.

18. What Kind Of Coffee Was Served On The Titanic?

Sanka.

19. What Is The Difference Between a Harley And a Hoover?!

The location of the! dirt bag.

20. Why Did Pilgrims' Pants Always Fall Down?

Because they wore their belt buckle on their hat.

21. What's The Difference Between a Bad Golfer And a Bad Skydiver?

A bad golfer goes, Whack, Dang!

A bad skydiver goes Dang! Whack.

22. How Are a Texas Tornado And a Tennessee Divorce The Same?

Somebody's gonna lose a trailer

Now, admit it. At least one of these made you smile.

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:P :P

Was it a pink fluffy house slipper?

N a green diesel. I like boy toys & shoes now!

Skully Cat

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Four retired guys are walking down a street in Miami Beach. Then they turn a corner and see a sign that says "Old Timer's Bar " ..." ALL DRINKS 10 CENTS ! ".

They look at each other then go in. On the inside, they realize in this case, they should not judge the 'book by its cover.'

The old bartender says in a voice that carries across the room, "Come on in and let me pour one for you! What'll it be, Gentlemen?"

There seems to be a fully-stocked bar, so the men all ask for a martini. In short order, the bartender serves up 4 iced martinis - shaken not stirred - and says, "That'll be 10 cents each , please." The four men stare at the bartender for a moment then look at each other. They can't believe their good luck. They pay the 40 cents, finish their martinis, and order another round. Again, four excellent martinis are produced with the bartender again saying, ......."That's 40 more cents, please."

They pay the 40 cents, but their curiosity is more than they can stand.

They've each had two martinis, and so far they've spent less than a dollar. Finally one of the men says, "How can you afford to serve martinis as good as these for a dime apiece?"

Here's my story. I'm a retired tailor from Brooklyn, and I always wanted to own a bar. Last year I hit the lottery for $25 million and decided to open this place. Every drink costs a dime, wine, liquor, beer, all the same."

"Wow. That's quite a story." says one of the men.

The four of them sipped at their martinis and couldn't help but notice three other guys at the end of the bar who didn't have a drink in front of them, and hadn't ordered anything the whole time they were there. One man gestures at the three at the end of the bar without drinks and asks the bartender, "What's with them?"

The bartender says, "Oh, those are vacationing Englishmen. They're waiting for happy hour."

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:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

The bartender says, "Oh, those are vacationing Englishmen. They're waiting for happy hour."

If your jokes are anything to go by, it could be a long wait.

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