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Pete

Itching

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hi all

I am BKA and on my first leg with a Neoprene sock liner then the normal cotton socks to get a fit.

I find that when I take everything off at night my leg itches like **** anybody got/had the same and what did you do about it apart from scratch. This has been going on for a couple of months now, thought at first it would go away on it's own.

Any help appreciated.

Pete

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Hi Pete:

I have the exact same problem. I have a silicone liner, I am a aka. I've tried so many things but I end up just scratching for a good 5 minutes in bed!

I hope we'll get some answers.

Lynne

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Hi Pete,

No, you're not alone. This has happened to me too - especially whenever I wear new silicone liners. But, after a few days it has settled down with me, which I never thought it would do.

I am pretty meticulous when it comes to the cleaning of my liners. I, almost obsessively :blink: , have to clean them as soon as I take them off at night. What I do is wipe them down with babywipes (I wash them with anti-bacterial handwash every couple of days).

I would suggest that you wash your residual leg after taking the leg off. The cooler the water the better. Some people do this in their basins whilst standing on one leg. If this is not possible for you, then wipe it with babywipes (as I do, until I can shower in the morning) and apply some cream/massage oil/aloe vera gel into your residual. You will notice the soothing affect of this almost immediately.

Also, make sure you clean your liner too. By either washing them in anti-bacterial soap/handwash or wiping them down with babywipes until you can clean them properly, you will also notice that this makes a big difference.

Don't forget that your liner is surrounded by your sweat and heat all day; making it a perfect breeding ground for bacteria/fungi! It is very important that you keep them clean and free of germs.

Hope this helps!

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Itching is always a damn problem. Finding an appropraite time and place to scratch is another.

By the way try to rub not scratch. The skin is very thin and delicate.

LOL.....me delicate.....yeah right <_<

Cat

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I use unscented plain soap on my liner and give it a good rinse in clean water after washing. I don't usually wash my stump before going to bed as I find it gets itchier and the skin dries out but I do use baby wipes (the unscented ones with aloe vera), then massage my stump with Aqeous Cream which helps moisturise it. If it's really itchy I'll use something like Germolene as this has a local aneasthetic in it which numbs the itchiness.

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I use unscented plain soap on my liner and give it a good rinse in clean water after washing. I don't usually wash my stump before going to bed as I find it gets itchier and the skin dries out but I do use baby wipes (the unscented ones with aloe vera), then massage my stump with Aqeous Cream which helps moisturise it. If it's really itchy I'll use something like Germolene as this has a local aneasthetic in it which numbs the itchiness.

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Is this double up day? :rolleyes:

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I find sometimes I get itchy when the limbs are too tight, but would warn against scratching. Once infections get established they are sometimes hard to get rid off and allergies can occur from the materials used in the liners/limbs.

Ann

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I find a hydrocortisone cream helps. I used to use an anti-bacterial gel to clean my liner and started having itching and a rash. The prosthetist told me that after the gel dries it leaves a residue so always rinse off the liner with water after the gel dries completely (about 10 minutes). I didn't really believe him but I did it and it worked. When I have the occasional itchy, I use the hydrocortisone cream.

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I think the rinsing is probably the most important part even if you use plain soap as even soap leaves a residue which will react with the skin.

Ed, some people don't think that silicon is an allergen but most silicon based products advise against prolonged exposure to the skin. I wonder if it's the actual silicon that's the problem or a residue left over from the manufacturing process. This would explain why the symptoms decrease after a few washes.

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I have the same problem with my Tec liner, I use a spray of Surgical spirit before applying Drapolene Nappy rash cream, I also slap and try never to scratch, it's like trying to eat a donut and not licking your lips!! :D

Paul

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For Ed--the chemical element you refer to is silicon (no E). Strictly speaking you can't become allergic to an element. However, allergy refers to a specific type of inflammatory reaction that involves the production of a class of antibodies called IgE. You can have inflammations that aren't allergies, and you can have immune responses that aren't allergies. Allergies mostly are directed against complete or partial proteins. The reason some people can have allergic reactions to an element like gold, for example, isn't the gold per se, it's skin proteins the gold has reacted with.

Silicon can chemically react with oxygen molecules in a particular way to make silica, which is the major ingredient of sand. Silicon can be artificially reacted with oxygen and various organic molcules to make silicones, of which there are many different types used very widely in foods, cosmetics, clothing, plastics, lubricants, and a lot of other products. It's nearly impossible to avoid contact with one form of silicone or another. For this reason, silicones have been extensively tested as allergens and to date have not been shown to elicit allergies on their own (remember the whole business over silicone breast implants?).

All that being said, my liners itch sometimes, too!

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I use hydrocortisone cream too. Well it's more like a salve, but it works overnight miracles. You don't want the wimpy stuff that comes over the counter. I got my through a dermatologist.

Nicole

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To Nicole (or anyone else that can answer this question):

Would this hydrocortisone cream help with ezcema at all?

I seem to have developed ezcema since my stay in hospital. I usually get it on my hands, and the itching drives me crazy! If it does help, then I will be 'running' out to get some! :blink:

Thanks.

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To Afet - I am sure my son has been given it for his ezcema in the past, think it comes in different strengths. However I wouldn't be happy using it long term.

Ann

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Afet--hydrocortisone is a steroid that can help turn off inflammation that produces itching, but doesn't necessarily address the underlying cause of the problem. The over-the counter creams, though wimpy in comparison to prescription strength, may give you some relief but if this is really bothering you go see a dermatologist. Eczema can be hard to diagnose but there are other drugs besides steroids that can help. The doctor may also be able to point out skin irritants you're being exposed to that you may be able to avoid.

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Thanks Ann and trwinship for your help.

I am going to make an appointment to see a dermatologist to get this sorted out. :)

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Thanks guys well at least I know I am not alone. I will try some of your suggestions, especially the baby wipe's see if that helps.

No I do not scratch as I have PVD so any cuts abrasions either take ages to heal or reult in leg ulcers.

Once again many thanks for your replies.

Pete

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I used to hate when I took my leg off and there was water inside it..I guess it was sweat and it grossed me out and it my stump was always itching.. so I would just go and take a shower after removing my artificial leg. One day, after taking a shower and change leg, before I put my silicone sleave on, I got my spray deodorant and sprayed my stump, wait until the skin was dried and put the silicone on. From that day on, I stopped getting sweaty and no more itching . I keep an eye on because maybe someday I will get a reaction, but so far so good.

Dea :D

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Dea,

I got a spray anti-perspirant from the prosthetist. It contains no deodorant so there's less lchance of a reaction. It was super cheap and lasts a long time.

Oh, and it works!

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Marcus--it warms my heart to know that somebody, somewhere, was actually awake during an immunology lecture, especially if I was the one delivering it. Now, young grasshopper, describe and discuss in detail.....homocytotrophic antibody! pencils down at 11:00!

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