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JohnnyV

Amputee Related Good Reads

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While I was at The ACA convention in Boston, I picked up two great inspirational books for amputees.

'You're Not Alone’ by John Sabolich, CPO and Scott Sabolich, CP

Part of a Free Patient Information Package that you can request.

Scott Sabolich Prosthetic & Research Center

'One Man's Leg - A Memoir’ by Paul Martin.

ONE MAN'S LEG website

Reviewed by Everyday Warriors' founder and webmaster, Jillian Leslie

If we could get recommendations from other amputees about good books for Amputees to read, that would be helpful for our readers of the forum. Thank you in advance for your participation in this topic.

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A good book I read recently was "No mean feat" by Mark Inglis.

Mark lost both his legs BK in 1982 to frost bite after being stuck in a snow cave near the summit of Mount Cook (in New Zealand) for 15 days.

Since losing his legs he put himself through university, got a science degree, became a wine maker and in 2001 he made it to the summit of Mt Cook (20 years after his last attempt) he has also won silver in the para-olympics in Sydney in cycling. What is really interesting is the technology used in some of his legs - an engineer at the Britten motorcycle company developed specialist legs for mountain climbing and cycling - the cycling legs are twin spar carbon fibre aerodynamic legs with no feet, but do have specially angled mounts to the pedals to get the most efficient cycling stroke.

I saw an news item recently where Mark was competing in a race up one of the taller buildings in Auckland (up the stairs) Mark was using legs that looked almost like pogo sticks (no feet) and he beat many younger "able-bodied" competitors

Mark is now an inspirational speaker. He has a website (minimal at present) at http://www.markinglis.co.nz where there is a photo of him climbing with the special climbing feet. He is planning on scaling Mt Everest in 2004

I found the book to be quite inspirational, and it has made me more determined not be disabled

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I read "Your Not Alone" before my surgery. It was a great inspiration - if they can do it, so can I! I have since recommended it to several new amputees. Surely of the 38 amputee stories, there is one or more that each of us can relate to. I tried to get a copy from ACA (Amputee Coalition of America) but it was not longer available. I look forward to getting a copy from Scott Sabolich Prosthetic & Research Center (thanks for the link, Johnny).

I few years ago I read "Blind Courage", by Bill Irwin, David McCasland, and Robert H. Schuller. Bill Irwin is not an amputee, but he is blind. The book is his inspiring story of his journey along the Appalachian Trail, accompanied by his seeing-eye dog. What an accomplishment!

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While I was at The ACA convention in Boston, I picked up two great inspirational books for amputees.

'You're Not Alone’ by John Sabolich, CPO and Scott Sabolich, CP

Part of a Free Patient Information Package that you can request.

Scott Sabolich Prosthetic & Research Center

'One Man's Leg - A Memoir’ by Paul Martin.

ONE MAN'S LEG website

Reviewed by Everyday Warriors' founder and webmaster, Jillian Leslie

If we could get recommendations from other amputees about good books for Amputees to read, that would be helpful for our readers of the forum. Thank you in advance for your participation in this topic.

:D The inMotion magazine from the ACA is always a good read it comes out bi-monthly and you receive it by becoming a member of the organization. It is well worth the $35 individual membership along with discounts of items that are for sale at the site. I throughly enjoy the articles even the ones that do not pertain to me specifically. Such as articles on diabetes (you never know). I too was at the Boston convention and picked up both of the books that you mentioned both are very good.

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I've read 2 books by Stan Toler. The titles are "God has never failed me,but He's sure scared me to death a few times" and " The buzzards are circling,but God isn't finished with me yet" Both are very uplifting books, a lot of referancing to the bible. I highly recommend these even if your not religious. It will make you think and realize your not alone and no matter what your problem is there will be relief some day. O.K. enough religion talk,but really they were really easy reading and as I said quite uplifting!

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A classic, of course, but inspirational to me has always been Paul Brickhill's 'Reach for the Sky", the Douglas Bader story. I had read it many years before becoming an amputee and found that, inadvertantly, it prepared me for a lot of what would happen when my own leg was removed. I still enjoy re-reading it. I wish I knew more about Bader's post WWII story.

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B) One addition to the reading list, "On the Ragged Edge of Drop Dead Gorgeous." Its a short book by Ivy Gunter a formal model. I think there might be a short story about her also in the John Sabolich book, " You're Not Alone." I'll have to check out the others!

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I am advocating this book in my community to provide early education to elementry school children of people with limb loss.  The earlier young children are exposed to the differences in people, the easier it will be for them to accept, before the aging process narrows their minds. As we have read in a number of the posts on this forum, children have the best attitude about people with limb loss, so it only makes sense to feed their minds with something positive while we have the oopportunity.
My Brand New Leg, is a story of courage, acceptance, friendship and overcoming obstacles. It's the short story of a little girl who has lost her leg because of cancer. While at school one day she meets and is challenged by another girl who is curious about what activities the main character can perform with a prosthetic leg. She learns that the main character can do the same things she can, such as ride a bike and run a race. The story is told in rhymes (a la Dr. Seuss). The rhythm, coupled with the beautiful illustrations, make the story easy and fun to read.

Paralympic medalist April Holmes writes, "I absolutely loved the book and would recommend it to people of all ages, not just children."

James Decapita of ABI Orthotic & Prosthetic Labs, a subsidiary of Hanger O&P Inc. writes, "I believe it should be placed in all prosthetic facilities for people to view."

Amputee Coalition of America librarian, Meredith Goins, calls it "A delight to read such a realistic portrayal of a child talking to others about her Brand New Leg."

My Brand New Leg will be placed in the library of the Amputee Coalition of America.

http://www.northstarent.net

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The Very Best Years

When are those years? Some would argue they occur in the twilight of life, when wisdom and experience merge to provide a perspective and understanding impossible to achieve in your youth. Others would point to the first five years of life, when you’re the center of everyone’s attention and everything you say is interesting, funny, and innocently charming.

No matter what your opinion, Danny Stein (bilateral BK) makes a strong case that every year – nay, every day – is the very best. Joining the ranks of Hemingway, Faulkner, and Twain, Danny is now a published author. Curious about the wisdom he has to impart? Check out Chicken Soup for the Preteen Soul 2, just out on your local bookstore’s shelf. Congratulations to Danny on his achievement.

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Weston Resident and Amputee Kevin Garrison Recounts Struggles and Victories as an Amputee in New Book; Reading and Signing Tuesday, Mar. 21, at Borders’ Coral Springs Store

Coral Springs, Florida – Tuesday, Mar. 21 – Kevin S. Garrison, author of the life-affirming biography “It’s Just a Matter of Balance,” will conduct a reading and book signing Tuesday, Mar. 21, at the Borders store. The reading will be at 7:30 p.m., at the corner of University Drive and Atlantic Blvd.

Garrison was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer, when he was 16 and eventually lost a foot to the disease. He began wearing a prosthesis at 17. His book recalls the initial heartbreak and then inspiring climb to a normal teenage existence when he played sports, dated and worked on cars. The book chronicles his journey to learn to love life and all it has to offer, despite the pain and suffering caused by a severe disability. It also talks to the families and friends of the afflicted person, all of whom are seriously impacted.

A native of Cleveland, Garrison completed his prosthetic education at the University California in Los Angeles and Northwestern University in Chicago. He is a Certified Prosthetist by the American Board for Certification in Orthotics and Prosthetics.

Garrison lives in Weston, Florida, with his wife and has five children. Garrison now devotes his life to helping other amputees at the company he founded and runs, Garrison’s Prosthetic Services, Inc., which has three clinics in Broward and Dade Counties.

“It’s Just a Matter of Balance’” was recently listed as an inspirational book on the web site of Sir Paul McCartney’s wife, Heather Mills McCartney, who is also an amputee. “Living proof that overcoming adversity can lead to greater things for yourself and those around you. An inspirational book whenever you’re feeling sorry for yourself,” said Mrs. McCartney in comments provided for Garrison’s web site.

Part of the proceeds from Garrison’s book will be donated to The Barr Foundation, a non-profit organization that supplies prosthetic limbs to needy amputees.

For more information on the book, call 1-888.333.8770. His site is http://www.garrisonop.com.

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Thanks Johnny:

Just ordered one myself. Keep in touch.

Pete

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Hi Johnny,

You're not alone; was fantastic.!

Have also read "A test of will" Warren MacDonald which was also very good

Living with a Below Knee Amputation-an insight from a prosthesist. Very Good and no nonscience, not for the light hearted, but worth reading.

Mel.

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Wow! I'm lucky, I've not read any of these and have these to look forward to! Yay for me... and many, many thanks for putting these titles out there for the newbies like me! :D

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Being One-Legged Is an Interesting Experience / by J. A. Coffeen. Houston, TX: J.A. & M.H. Coffeen, Grouder Publishing, c2000. ISBN 0-930271-04-1. This is the story of how a 73 year old man adapts to losing his leg to cancer.

How I Became a Human Being: A Disabled Man's Quest for Independence / Mark O'Brien with Gillian Kendall. Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin Press,c2003. ISBN 0-299-18430-7. This is the memoir of Mark O'Brien, a man who contracted polio when six and became paralyzed from the waist down. Markdescribes the struggles to be independent despite having a lifelong disability. He was the subject of the 1997 Academy Award-winning documentary Breathing Lessons.

How to Conquer the World with One Hand…and an Attitude / by Paul E. Berger and Stephanie Mensh. Merrifield, VA: Positive Power Publishing, c1999. ISBN0-9668378-1-9. This is the story of a young man's recovery from a devastating stroke, taking the reader on a journey far beyond the typical"survivor" story, into the depths of a young man's feelings, across ten years of physical and emotional challenges.

It’s Just a Matter of Balance / Kevin S.Garrison. South Euclid, OH: Print Vantage, 2005. ISBN 0-9773261-0-1.Prosthetist Kevin Garrison tells his story about how he became a below-knee (BK) amputee after being diagnosed with cancer as a teenager. He offers hope and inspiration to all amputees young and old.

The Next Leg of My Journey / Lenor Madruga Chappell. San Jose: iUniverse.com,Inc., c2000. ISBN 0-595-14639-2. In this sequel to One Step at a Time the author engages the reader with the intimate and heart wrenching details of the painful demise of her marriage, admitting that "losing her husband was worse than losing her leg." Committed to enjoying life, no matter what it brings, this remarkable story of learning tolove again is uplifting and achingly honest. This is the story of unbelievable willpower and human triumph.

On Borrowed Time...With Interest / Rusty Kearney. SaltLake City, Utah: Northwest Publishing, c1995. ISBN 1-56901-219-9. This story, which is based on the author’s real life, shows the experiences of Kevin who loses both of his legs in a traumatic accident and survives near-destruction from alcohol abuse.

One Step at a Time: A Young Woman's Inspiring Struggle to Walk Again / Lenor Madruga. San Jose: iUniverse.com, Inc., c2000. ISBN 0-595-14914-6. On the morning of her 32nd birthday, the author discovered a small hard lump on her thigh. Within a few nightmare months, she had barely saved her life--and lost her leg. Now she tells the story of her struggle to return from the abyss of pain, drug addiction, self-torment, and depression that threatened to swallow up her entire life. It is a triumphant story of her determination to dance, drive, swim, water-ski, make love--and do almost everything she used to do before her operation.

Up and Running: The Inspiring True Story of a Boy's Struggle to Survive and Triumph / MarkPatinkin. New York:Center Street, c2005. ISBN 1-931722-49-8. Six-year-old Andrew Bateson battles bacterial meningitis. From cover: "A Must-read... Up and Running is about a strong and loving family that never lost its faith or hope in the face of unimaginable adversity."

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Hello,

I have to say that I have read You Are Not Alone, and it was sooo awesome. I have actually got 3 copies of it..

I aqm going to Sabolich's tomorrow to do some work on my new prosthetic. All the people are so friendly, and they make you feel right at home.. I actually met the guy from Duncan a few weeks ago. He was really cool..

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