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TIPS FOR DAILY LIVING AS AN AMPUTEE

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2 hops and 1 step?????????????

I am willing to try that.

Lets go.............

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I started running ,(if you can call it that), with the grandson of a friend of mine one day, and he just roared in laughter. He said that he had seen everything now. I don't imagine that I was too graceful, but we had a good laugh out of it anyway.

At 69, the last thing I worry about is how I look in an honest endeavor. My friends understand and those that don't understand .......... well, you know.

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Get yourself off to a big soft rugby field

Just try and make sure there is not a match going on or you could get squashed! :D

Also don't do what I have just done which is leave your socket to wam up on a radiator!! As it might melt as mine has done :( Hope my centre will replace it?? :wub:

Use a hair drier to warm up, much safer

PJ ;)

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You have to take 2 hops on your good leg and then 1 walk with the prosthetic leg.

Yvonne & Ally, that's exactly what you can do as an AK - I've been doing that forever - looks funny but helps you get some speed. You can't help but smile when you do it! :P

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"Two hops and a step" sounds like half-skipping to me... is that what we're talking about here? Have not tried it yet, but I can see where it could be faster!

Warming up the "gear": On a cole morning, I just haul my liner and leg into bed with me for about tem minutes before I get up and don it... everything's at body temperature by then!

take care... cherylm

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Hi guys,

which breed of dog would you consider best suited for a support dog?

Irish Wolfhound, St Bernard? :D

Love,

Mike RHD

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Guest bearlover
You have to take 2 hops on your good leg and then 1 walk with the prosthetic leg.

Yvonne & Ally, that's exactly what you can do as an AK - I've been doing that forever - looks funny but helps you get some speed. You can't help but smile when you do it! :P

When I want to whear a pair of pants that are narrow at the ankel. i sometimes dress the leg first. Or put the leg on and put a plastic bag over the prosthetic shoe and pull my pants over the bag. Works pretty good!

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Guest bearlover
Hi guys,

which breed of dog would you consider best suited for a support dog?

Irish Wolfhound, St Bernard? :D

Love,

Mike RHD Both are beautiful creatures. But very big. I love the Irish wolfhound too. A big baby of a dog!

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Hi guys,

which breed of dog would you consider best suited for a support dog?

Irish Wolfhound, St Bernard? :D

Love,

Mike RHD

I have Briards (French sheep dogs) which are really hairy but have good temperaments for support dogs.

If I had to choose between an IW and a Saint Bernard, I believe I'd take a "Wolfie" every time. If I had to choose from any breed, then it would probably be either an Australian Cattle Dog (Queensland) or one of the mastiffs. The former is smarter and very protective, the latter is taller and heavier. B) B)

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Gil, I have an old St Bernard. She has been fantastic since my amputation. Although she is now 10yrs old she follows me everywhere in the house, stands beside me when I stop and walks when I walk.

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Gil, I have an old St Bernard. She has been fantastic since my amputation. Although she is now 10yrs old she follows me everywhere in the house, stands beside me when I stop and walks when I walk.

Sparky

I was coming from the place of having to get a companion dog. Most family pets will easily get into the "companion" dog role, once they sense what is needed.

That's a nice looking St Bernard. She knows your needs and is there to help. Dogs are that way.

My dogs want to sniff/lick my stump cause they know it's not "right" and that is their way of trying to heal us.

I have a friend with MS who has a Shih-Tzu that goes to the door or telephone whenever that bell rings, and is generally a "cuddly little buddy" in between. :) :)

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OK, this is a 'spin off' from ED's thread in the Prosthetics and Related forum about Gait Training.

I had mentioned in a reply that, after physiotherapy that I received, I was able to get up from sitting USING JUST MY LEG STRENGTH, without needing to push with my arms.

It had come to my attention that others would like to know how to do this too.

Considering that we don't all get the same level of physiotherapy after our amputations - if any at all! - I thought that it would be very useful if we were to have a section here with our 'HOW TO' type of explanations on how we do things.

So, I'll start with an explanation of how to do the above, but please feel free to add your own. That's the reason this is here anyway.

If you are adding your own, I think it would be helpful if we added our level of amputation in our post, because, for example, my tips may not apply to an AK amputee, and so on.

HOW TO GET UP FROM SITTING, WITHOUT USING YOUR ARM STRENGTH

Type of amputee I am: Bilateral Below Knee

If you're a particularly new amputee or out of practise, I'd recommend having someone nearby to help you (or to act as padding!) should something go wrong. Anyway, here we go:

* First of all, you need to come to the edge of your seat.

* Ensure that your feet are at a comfortable distance apart - not too close together or too far apart.

* Make sure that they are not too far away (distance wise) from your whole body. I usually put my legs at a 90 degree angle.

* Get a feel for where your feet are.

* Try and feel that THE CENTRE OF YOUR FOOT/FEET are on the ground.

* Practise pushing down on your feet whilst you are still sitting.

* When ready, push down on your feet, whilst leaning forward at the same time.

* Lean as forward as you need to go (without toppling over), pushing down on your feet at the same time.

* Once up, breathe in and enjoy the view! YOU MADE IT!!

This took me a bit of practise, but I eventually got it!

You'd need to have done some form of leg exercises before hand, to strengthen the muscles in your legs and glutes (backside) - exercises which I may post myself if no-one else volunteers it.

Good luck! You can do it!! B)

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OK, this is a 'spin off' from ED's thread in the Prosthetics and Related forum about Gait Training.

I had mentioned in a reply that, after physiotherapy that I received, I was able to get up from sitting USING JUST MY LEG STRENGTH, without needing to push with my arms.

It had come to my attention that others would like to know how to do this too.

Considering that we don't all get the same level of physiotherapy after our amputations - if any at all! - I thought that it would be very useful if we were to have a section here with our 'HOW TO' type of explanations on how we do things.

So, I'll start with an explanation of how to do the above, but please feel free to add your own. That's the reason this is here anyway.

If you are adding your own, I think it would be helpful if we added our level of amputation in our post, because, for example, my tips may not apply to an AK amputee, and so on.

HOW TO GET UP FROM SITTING, WITHOUT USING YOUR ARM STRENGTH

Type of amputee I am: Bilateral Below Knee

If you're a particularly new amputee or out of practise, I'd recommend having someone nearby to help you (or to act as padding!) should something go wrong. Anyway, here we go:

* First of all, you need to come to the edge of your seat.

* Ensure that your feet are at a comfortable distance apart - not too close together or too far apart.

* Make sure that they are not too far away (distance wise) from your whole body. I usually put my legs at a 90 degree angle.

* Get a feel for where your feet are.

* Try and feel that THE CENTRE OF YOUR FOOT/FEET are on the ground.

* Practise pushing down on your feet whilst you are still sitting.

* When ready, push down on your feet, whilst leaning forward at the same time.

* Lean as forward as you need to go (without toppling over), pushing down on your feet at the same time.

* Once up, breathe in and enjoy the view! YOU MADE IT!!

This took me a bit of practise, but I eventually got it!

You'd need to have done some form of leg exercises before hand, to strengthen the muscles in your legs and glutes (backside) - exercises which I may post myself if no-one else volunteers it.

Good luck! You can do it!! B)

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Hi All, My name is Linda and I am a hip disartic. Lost left legdue to cancer. Am just getting new leg ! As to the getting up from sitting. You can do it but it does require strength in the good leg and a very good sense of balance. To achieve this I go to yoga and practise on one leg, swim and do leg strengthening exercises. However, I must say it is a good idea to have something to grab onto if needs be!!!! I am trying to get up from sitting only using the one leg but no success as yet!!! I think it has been easier for me as before the amp I was on crutches and not able to weight bear so good leg was getting a work out! I also think that as long as I can get up I am happy however it happens!! Good luck.

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Hey everyone,

I just wanted to add my favorite quote that I heard when I was taking my first steps.

"Decide for yourself what your limitations are. There is always someone who says you'll never do this or you'll never do that. If you listen to these people, you'll spend the rest of your life in bed."

Hope this encourages people.

:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

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hi All,

I too hyper extend both knees. I have no patellas and the hyper extension seems to make me feel more balanced. Once the prosthesis tried making so I would not hyper extend and I felt like I would last 30 sec without falling over.

Peace. Beth Marie

One of the first things I do with clients presenting with lower back pain is check their shoes for unusual wear marks and the length of their legs. Small differences can create a hell of a lot of discomfort.

I hyper extend both knees......I wonder if this is normal for BK?

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Hi BethMarie....did you go to the conference this year? If so, tell us all about your experience this year....see anything you might want in the near future? New covers, legs or feet. Most of all did you have a good time. :smile:

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11/28/2010

Hi All,

It may seem silly advise to some - or others may have learned this lesson as I did - but I will now always test exercise equipment stop/kill switches before I begin a workout.

Before my misadventure this weekend I would have never, ever, thought a treadmill could be dangerous. Life lesson number 1, 497. The upside it was a great way to talk with several members of my health club who I had only waved to in the past. I'm headed back this morning to have another go. My it only be some calories that are burned.

Jane

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