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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
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Shrink socks?

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Hi everyone,

now I have a question that I never thought I'd have to ask!

I have lived in Cornwall for the past 8 winters, yet none before has been as cold as this winter. Invasions of the white fluffy stuff, frosts etc.

When I go out in my wheelchair my stump seems to get colder than the rest of me.

So, I put on an old shrink sock and wear that, which seems to solve the problem.

The question is, will the shrink sock continue to 'work' when I wear it. (As in, will it continue to shrink my stump. I only wear it on odd cold days, for a max of 4 hours.) My stump is slightly thinner than when I last used the s/sock.

I have tried other stump socks, but they roll off. The shrink sock has a belt that is sown to it.

My concern is that I've had the same size socket on my prosthesis since I was first fitted with one.

Or, has anyone else had this problem with cold and how was it overcome.

As........

Steve

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Hi Steve

My experience has been that the shrink sock keeps the edema from building up in the stump when the leg is inactive. During activity, (i.e. walking),the muscle works as a pump to keep the fluids from collecting. When hanging the stump down without any activity, or the prosthetic socket to keep it checked, the stump will swell.

I take my leg off to sleep, and the stump stays the same because it is on a level plane, but when I hang it down for any length of time, (20 - 30 minutes or more), it will begin to swell.

Hot or cold, this all works the same for me. I wear the Knit Rite wool sock, so it in itself keeps my stump warm. I only bring the shrinker out when I am going to be sitting (like in the CP's office), without my leg for a period of time. In my recliner at home, my stump is elevated to a level position.

When I stand up to shower, (holding onto the grab bars), I am in there such a short period of time that the swelling doesn't have time to start.

As I said - these are my experiences over 17 plus years. I hope this helps some.

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Hi Steve.

Being a relatively new amputee (LBK) I am still doing what i was told at my

Limb fitting centre and that is "Wear your Juzo sock when not wearing your prosthesis. it prevents swelling of your stump and thus assists with the correct fitting in your socket."

I have noticed that when sat in my wheel chair without the juzo on for any length of time that my stump does indeed swell. I put this down to the fact that my leg is unsupported and all the weight is on the underneath of my thigh which resticts the circulation in my stump, so I always wear it except when i forget, and that my stump is hanging down..

Going back to your question about cold. Your stump will always feel the cold more than the rest of you due to restricted circulation.

In other words thanks to Jim T he explains it well

Hope this helps

John

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Thanks Guys for the info.

It's been very helpful. As said since we don't normally have cold weather, I've not come across this problem before.

One suggestion put to me the other day was to go to the Med for the winter, problem solved! A great idea, but other cmmitments stop me from going. So I'll take heed of the advice you've given me.

Thanks again

As....

Steve

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Hi Steve

Can't answer your question about shrinker socks as I have never really worn them, however, I do agree about this winter being very cold (i am in the south of the UK) and about stumps getting cold.

I am usually wearing a prosthesis but have noticed on the days I don't wear it my stump does get cold, I notice also this is the time when I usually get "nerve" or "phantom" pains. I usually get around this problem by putting two or three stump socks on, but have to admit have a prob. keeping them up, I am b/k, they usually fall off.

Ann

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When I go out in my wheelchair my stump seems to get colder than the rest of me.

Your leg gets colder as it's not working very much compared to the rest of you. But more importantly, because of the amputation your blood vessels have been 'redesigned' and your muscle pumps aren't working as well.

If your leg has shrunk a bit since you were last measured for your shrinker sock, I would ask your limb centre to remeasure your leg, as shrinker socks come in different sizes.

I would also keep an eye on your leg whilst wearing the shrinker in cold weather (i.e. just make sure you leg stays nice & warm), as I have found that it can sometimes be hard to tell if the blood supply is being cut off when your leg gets cold.

Lizzie :)

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I do agree about this winter being very cold (i am in the south of the UK)

That'll be the warm soft underbelly of the south will it :lol: :lol: :lol:

You want to try being up north, then you'll know what cold is :lol:

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Hi Mike,

I used to live in Essex, freezing North/North easterly winds :(

So I 'emigrated' to (as Muz would say) the land of the 'pointy heads :D

AKA, Cornwall, which normally has a sub-tropical climate. This is the first winter I've had to buy a thermal winter coat, gloves, and a wooly hat :o

(not a pretty sight :rolleyes: )

As.....

Steve

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Steve ...

T'wer minus 9 t'other neet an we ad no fancy thermal clobber tha knaws. In fact ower lass gor up at 5 o clock t'other mornin to do er paper round, and she still went out in er shorts and vest. I said put thy coat on lass, an she said naaaa ahl leave it on't bed for thee, what a woman. Bless er

:lol:

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Now just so us in the South are not out done by Northern chaps, showing kindness and generosity to 'Er indoors, I will relate an incident that shows how kind we are to our 'Er indoors.

I was driving home one day and saw 'Er indoors struggling up the hill with heavy bags filled with vims and stuff from the supermarket. Ten minutes later 'Er indoors came into the house puffing and panting, dropping the bags on the floor. Whilst 'Er indoors was making me a cup of tea, I gave some thought to her carrying heavy bags of shopping up the hill.

So when 'Er indoors brought my tea and bickies, I told 'Er I would help her so she wouldn't have to carry all that heavy shopping. I told 'Er I would cut 'Er housing keeping money in half so she could only buy half as much and therefore would only need to carry half the amount of bags.

She was so pleased she gave me the last Hob-Nob, so I could have a dunk.

What a women!

So us Southerners are really kind to our women :P

As.......

Steve

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Steve--

I really think Jim & John anwered your question right on. I don't think I could add anything to what they said.

Patti

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Now just so us in the South are not out done by Northern chaps, showing kindness and generosity to 'Er indoors, I will relate an incident that shows how kind we are to our 'Er indoors.

I was driving home one day and saw 'Er indoors struggling up the hill with heavy bags filled with vims and stuff from the supermarket. Ten minutes later 'Er indoors came into the house puffing and panting, dropping the bags on the floor. Whilst 'Er indoors was making me a cup of tea, I gave some thought to her carrying heavy bags of shopping up the hill.

So when 'ErĀ  indoors brought my tea and bickies, I told 'Er I would help her so she wouldn't have to carry all that heavy shopping. I told 'Er I would cut 'Er housing keeping money in half so she could only buy half as much and therefore would only need to carry half the amount of bags.

She was so pleased she gave me the last Hob-Nob, so I could have a dunk.

What a women!

So us Southerners are really kind to our women :P

As.......

Steve

Eee Bah Gum Steve, tha knaws ow to treat tha wimmin reet.

Tha's far too good to yon lass, tha'll be spoilin er if tha carries on.

Just ope she's reet proud o'thee.

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I alus thowt that them frum below Watford wer funny buggers but tha'at talkin tight like a yorkshire man. Wit money tha'as saved, buy thi'sen sum new socks to keep the stump warm.

John

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Hi, to all!

I am new to this forum. I am RBKA as of Oct. 11 '05, due to sarcoma. Because of healing issues resulting from prior radiation, I am just now getting ready for my 1st prosthesis, and just got my 1st shrinker sock a few days ago. I am finding that it rolls down a lot, especially in the night. How can I prevent this?

Barbara

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Hi Barbara

Why are you wearing it at night?

I have found that when my leg and stump are on a level, like lying down or reclining in my chair, or my stump on an ottoman or pillow, it does not swell. I get right up in the morning and put my stump sock, liner and leg on and I'm on my way. No problem.

I too tried wearing the shrinker in the beginning. (One or two nights), and my prosthetist asked me the same question - why?

The only time I use it is when my stump is hanging down for any length of time. Like when I have a sore and have to be on my crutches without my leg. Then I definitely wear it. Or sitting in a straight chair in the CP's office.

These are my experiences.

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Why are you wearing it at night?

(You got there just before me, Jim! :) )

Welcome to the forum, Barbara!

I wouldn't wear a stump shrinker at night. In fact, I've been advised never to wear one when I'm asleep as the shrinker can cut off your circulation...:o However, a few people are advised by their doctor to wear one at night - perhaps you're one of those?

Lizzie :)

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My prosthetist suggested I wear it at night, because the shrinking process is just beginning for me! During the day, he has me wearing an Iceross liner like the one I will be getting with the prosthesis.

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I've noticed that each CP has his own way of doing things. If you have confidence in him/her, then I would follow whatever they say, of course.

Circulatiion is the reason I lost my leg in the first place, so like Lizzie, I am very concerned about something tight around my stump or leg for any length of time.

I'm sorry. Where are my manners? I also welcome you to our "little group". We hope to hear more from you. Stick around.

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Hi Barbara.

I too am a recent amputee LBK in march 05 and I was told always to wear my juzo sock at night. This is paticularly important in the early stages to help reduce swelling and to help your stump to stabilise quicker.

The socks come in different sizes and as your stump gradually shrinks you may need a smaller size.

I say this because I always wear mine at night and I have found that the only time mine rolls down or slides off during the night is when it doesn't fit tightly enough.

You may need a new smaller one because your stump has shrunk.

Hope this helps

John

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I was told to always wear a shrinker at night. Oh, Marcus.....

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Welcome Barbara--I too was told to wear one and 2years have gone by and I'm still wearing one at night. I have changed sizes during this time but I find that any phantom pain is less when I wear it.

Carol

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