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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
Ally

Does anyone want to stop smoking?

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Hello group

Did anyone make a NY resolution to stop smoking and it's working out?

Or does anyone want to stop smoking kind of like now.

Sigh - I am so tired of running into Pegleg Jack on various forums. He doesn't preach non-smoking, but he lost both of his legs due to sickerettes, and it always makes me think.

See now, yesterday I ran out of smokes. It was raining, and I was too lazy to go and buy more. So I just decided - hell, now is as good a time as any. Not the most clever way to stop I think, with no plan, and no idea how to get through the first week or so. Be that as it may - I am on day 2 today.

I've been smoking for about 25 years. :rolleyes: and I am thoroughly sick and tired of this addiction, and the way in controls me.

Anyone else in the forum feel like this?

Ally

Oh yes - I'm a bit scared that I am going to let myself down, so that's probably half the reason I posted here....sigh....public declarations & responsibility

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Good for you, Ally! :)

I was a 'social smoker' for a few years & was one of the lucky ones as I didn't find it difficult to give up. :rolleyes: Although, I think it may have had something to do with me noticing that my BK turned purple when I smoked! :o

As you know, my cure to all ills is a LINK...so, I've found one that may help. :)

Go on! You can do it...you know you can!!! :D

Lizzie :)

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Ally there is a wonderful book called Easyway to Stop smoking by Allen Carr. This bloke used to smoke about 100 per day and like you just stopped like that.

His book has a 98% success rate-pity I havent' read it yet. But the people I know who have all have given up. It sells here for about $12.95 almost the price of one packet :o

ps: he says if you use patches you'll just start again. ;)

Good luck-huge effort I wish i had never started again

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Hi Ally and Mel,

I have been using lozenges and have found them easier than the patches because you can just have a lozenge when you get a craving and it really does go away almost straight away, as opposed to the patches which are meant to release nicotine into your bloodstream gradually but which I still get cravings (which I am far too weak willed to resist) from!

I also tried hypnotism and Alan Carr in the past and they have both failed miserably for me.

I suppose it is whether you really want to give up or not that matters. For me, I know it is solely the guilt of smoking that is stopping me. It just got too much. I really do want to keep my health.

If only there was a way to keep smoking which wouldn't mean that you might die from it in the future eh. I reckon there is some money to be made out of that.....

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Ally,

The best thing I ever did was stop smoking about 10 years ago. I used the nicotine patches which helped to take the edge off. Mind you I had patches stuck all over me for the first week :lol:

The main thing is, you really have to want to stop, and have the will power to see it through.

The first couple of weeks are tough, but then it does get easier, and guess what ! the first time you can say .. 'I'm a non smoker' ... is worth all the effort.

Stick with it girl you CAN do it

We are here to help

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Hi Ally

About 8 years ago while at work I went outside to have a cig. I lit up, took a drag or two and just stopped. I asked myself why I was standing outside in the rain trying to stay dry just to add pollutants to my lungs, horrible odor to my hair, clothes, etc., and paying outrageous prices for all of that. I quit just like that after smoking for 25 years. I guess I just got bored with it. I couldn't reasonably convince myself that it was exciting anymore (as if it ever was).

My husband is a non-smoker and he used to do all the things people do when they think they are helping a loved one quit: hiding the cigs, throwing them out; you know the drill. None of that ever worked. I just got bored. No other explaination. What I loved about quitting is that within a few days food started tasting sooooo much better! I could smell things again, not always a plus :lol: , and for the first time in years I didn't get broncitis twice a year!

All of us start smoking for different reasons and I think most of us that smoke want to quit for a variety of reasons. I was lucky in that I was able to quit without any cravings.

I wish you all the best with this Ally, as I had made several attempts to stop and didn't succeed until that day 8 years ago. Unfortnately there is no perfect way to do it, but maybe if you can convince yourself you are just down right bored to tears with it you'll continue to have success.

So take a deep breath of cleaner air :P and GOOD LUCK!

I know that any woman with your foritude will be able to do this.

And think of this...If you take the money you pay daily for your cigs how much less would a ticket to the conference be? Or a new saddle for that beauty you just got?

Wishing you all the luck in the world!

Diane :)

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I have been smoke free for 2 years now. When I had my amputation, I didn't smoke for the time in the hospital but when I got home I started right up. After I was home for about 5 days, I was returned to the hospital with serious infection and some more of my leg was taken. The autoimmune disease I have causes my blood vessels to narrow so smoking only helped it along. While in the hospital the second time, I asked the doctor for Wellbutrin. It (a) worked, (b)psychologically worked, or © I got the s**t scared out of me because I stopped smoking. I quit taking the Wellbutrin sometime late last summer and I do get cravings. But it seems like that started after Katrina. So, who knows...so far I have resisted and I know the cravings will pass. I'd still smoke if I could <_< It's the best bad habit there is.

Good luck. If I can do it ANYBODY can do it.

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There's an old saying in another group that I belong to:

Just wanting it is not enoungh - you've got to want to want it.

The same with smoking. Many want to quit. Only the serious ones actually do. It requires effort and determination. "Stick-to-it-ivness" my dad used to call it.

I put out my last cigarette just before going in for my first operation. (Minutes before.) I was in and out of ICU and CCU so much, and then the pulminary edema. Then my wife kept forgetting to bring my cigarettes up to my room, so by the time I was home I had gone about a month without any. I still hadn't "quit", but told myself I would have one later. A couple of months after that my son-in-law mentioned that I had quit. "The heck I have", I said, and went and bought a pack, opened it and put it in the glove compartment, for when I wanted one. Three day's later, without having any, I gave them to him and said that I guess that I had quit. These by the way were Pall Mall unfiltered. Two to three packs a day. The long ones. I had been smoking for about 34 years, (18 to 52).

One year or so after that, I came home from work to find my wife grouchy and irritable. (Which just wasn't like her.) When I asked what was wrong, she blurted out that she hadn't had a cigarette in 24 hours.

That was the end of it for both of us. 1987 for me and 1989 for my wife. We have never looked back.

Either I do something or I don't. I don't know how to do things half way.

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Way to go Ally and as my cocketiel (Shadow) would say, "YOU CAN DO IT"!! :D He's a great inspiration, when I'm lying on the floor doing my exercises, that's what I hear...... so cool!! B) :lol: ;)

Anyways, I quit 10yrs ago next month, b/c of losing my leg to PVD and the Doc said, there are other factors, but mostly from all those years of smoking and many years it was too. :( I think when someone knows what there up against, should they decide to continue, for me, that's all I needed to know and never looked back. Yes, there were times when I first came home from the hospital and thought about it, especially when he was at work and I was alone, but then I looked down and knew nothing was worth losing the only one left. I figured, hey if I can survive an amputation, then I can survive anything, including smoking and I was right. :wub:

You CAN also, be determined and mostly do it b/c YOU want to, NOT b/c others think you should, k? Good Luck and if there is anything I can do to help please don't hesitate, even if you just want to rant and rave, I know the feeling, k? :D

Also, a big CONGRATULATIONS to all that have managed to become smoke free!! ;)

Sheila lbk

Maine USA

Keep Smiling :)

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Over 12 years now. Decided to stop one day and failed the very first day whilst driving to work. I decided the next day I would do better and managed about 3 weeks before I lit one up without thinking. I took about 2 puffs and suddenly realised what I had done, stubbed it out and haven't touched one since. I used to keep an open packet in the car then when I thought I had stopped for long enough changed it for a sealed pack ... I eventually gave them to someone who needed them more than I did :)

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Hi Ally,

Well, you're off to a great start. I quit a billion times before I "really" quit. I would try here & there, but never stayed quit. I totally quit during my pregnancies, but those night time feedings had me standing by the door smoking away, rain or snow...didn't matter. For me my final quit came for three reasons: the $$$$, my health & my annoying children refering to me as doing drugs. Hard to argue with when you're trying to set examples. In the past, I had tried the patch, after smoking while wearing the patch didn't kill me...I quit the patch & the nicotine gum failed. This time I tried taking Zyban, prescription. My neighbor was on it as well. She swore by it & has never had another. Me, I didn't feel like the pill was doing a damned thing. I will say it lessened the withdrawl effects though. So, after a week or two of the pills, I tossed them as well as the cigs all together & never looked back. I consider myself much like an alcoholic. I know if I were to ever put a cigartte up to my mouth again...1 puff..& I'd be back to 2pks a day in no time! So my advisce is.it ain't easy, but it is possible. Just keep telling yourself with each passing day that you've lasted this long so you can do this. Before you know it a week will have passed & you won't want to break your record. Just stay out of the pubs for a while...that's a hard one! I miss it, but I am glad I no longer smoke. Remember the benefits to being a non-smoker. And the worst complication of smoking....WRINKLES!!!!! :o (ok, maybe not the worst, but it's a good reason to quit!)

Good luck,

Linda

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Hi Ally:

Congratulations! I would love to quit!

Would you like a partner to help each other.

Lynne

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Linda - I hear ya about the pubs......I am going to try and stay clear of those for at least 2 weeks. If alcohol can get me :o dancing on a bar counter, I am damn sure it can convince me that one puff will be ok.

LYNNE - yes yes yes yes yes - are you ready?? I am on my 3rd day now.

They say that the first 3 days are the worst. Then the following week is not nice either. Then the week following that is bad, but better. Then after that - it just gets better and better.

Now see, the ONLY thing that has kept me going, is the fact that whenever you get a craving, IT ONLY LASTS A MAXIMUM OF 3 MINUTES. And you can set your clock by that.

So - hell - I can do 3 minutes. Even if the craving comes every 10 to 20 minutes in the begininning - I can still handle 3 minutes. And this has worked for me so far. It has made this whole thing much more manageable.

I am an asthmatic (no comments please - I know I was bad), and for the last 2 days I have woken up BREATHING on my own - I didn't need to use a pump immediately.

I have put on 100 pounds already :P , but I don't care. If I can give up smoking, then I can lose the excess weight that I put on afterwards. Getting a bit fat is not going to stand in my way of giving up my addiction to sickerettes. And anyway - I have started walking the dog (she weighs 45 kg's and I weigh 50 kg's) so it's a good thing that I will have some extra weight behind me - she's never walked on a leash before :D and she's only pulled me over 3 times so far.

So Lynne - Lizzie posted a link for me earlier in the thread....take a look and see what you think.

And everyone else - thank you for your comments and encouragement. I'm trying to stay positive. So far, so good.

Ally

:)

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Ally -

I quit 26 years ago after 15 years of smoking. I did it with the 3-minute concept, too. The cravings get further and further apart, and easier to bear each time you succeed!

As for walking the dog - do you get to see the Dog Whisperer there? in the US we get him on the Natioanl Geographic channel. If you don't you could order his video - and it will change how you and the dog walk! He should not be pulling you. If he is in front, he is the pack leader!

Barbara

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Hey Barbara

I really believe that the only reason I am able to carry on (into my 4th day now :) ) is by keeping my eye on that 3 minute thing.

As far as the dog goes....oh shame....poor Magnolia Mae! She has never been walking on a lead before (with a harness because she is so big), so between her and I, we really didn't know what we were doing. All things considered, we did quite well. She understood that when I yelled, she had to stop. Poor thing. We must have been such a sight coming down the road.

But I will look out for that book. Thank you for the advice. Or maybe I may be lucky enough to catch it on National Geographic.

My son and my mother both thought that I took my life in my hands when I went out 'walkies' with the dog. Eish - they need to lighten up a little B)

Kind regards

Ally

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Hello everyone, you are talking about smoking. I smoked for 43 years 3 packs aday. When i left hospital in Dec. 2003 after my 8th surgery and before my amputation, I came home with walker sit down in my recliner, put cigs. on table and never touch them again. I did not even think about smoking. I don't know what caused it. My wife smokes and I still go to taverns where they smoke and it does not bother me at all. I think it is all in your mind and you have to want to quit, or a greater person than us has to help. Jerry Poston

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Hi Ally - how is it going?

I caved in last saturday in the pub after about a bottle of white wine and had one, which I was really quite annoyed about on Sunday morning when I woke up feeling terrible, but I haven't had one since and am seeing it as a blip as I reckon 3 weeks smoke free is pretty good.

Having said that I am having quite a celebration (and probably alcohol) filled weekend this weekend and so really hope I can keep myself together. I have decided that it was definitely the white wine that was to blame last time and so am going to stick to red tonight and tomorrow..........

x x x

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Hello Fiona

Well, it's going ok - haven't slipped up yet. I am going out tonight, probably to drink far too much, so thanks for the warning about the white wine - I shall drink vodka instead.

Three weeks is very good going. Well done. I am on day 9. I am bored today, so it's a bit tougher than usual.

Let me know how your weekend went - I am going to try and be strong, I don't think I will have the courage or the energy to go through the first week of giving up again.

Sigh.

Ally

:)

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Hang in there, girls. You're doing great. So you had one, Fiona. It ain't over, but it's tough when you're drinking. Cigs and booze just go so well together.... <_< (deep sigh).

Okay, who's working on those harmless smokes.....

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It was coffe and cigs that were the perfect combination for me. Funnily enough I don't drink as much coffe any more either.

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FRI. MY 51YO DAUGHTER WAS DIAGNOSED WITH STAGE 3 LUNG CANCER...SMOKED FOR 35 YEARS....SHE SAID SHE WONT STOP...HER FATHER DIED OF LUNG CANCER AT THE AGE OF 59....MY SON AND 3 OTHER DAUGHTERS SMOKE....DON'T KNOW IF THEY WILL STOP... PRAY TO GOD THEY DO...

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The coffee and cigs were outstanding. I don't drink as much coffee anymore either.

I hope they stop smoking too, Nann.

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Hi,

It went fine. Stuck to the red wine and didn't have a cigarette on either Friday or Saturday.

I am not really craving them at all normally during the day now. It was just a couple of times on Saturday when there were people smoking around me that I thought about it.

I also hope that they stop smoking Nann

x x x

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