Jump to content
Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
naylor

having a bath

Recommended Posts

my hospital ot came out and measured things now he says he has to come out again as with me being 19 stone and 6ft 3 they have had to order a wheelchair i am having a stairlift but he says he has to measure upstairs again as they are undecided what to put upstairs to help me to the bathroom my partner has suggested a self propelled commode come shower chair they say a wheel chair but thats if it fits through upstairs doors i hav ejust measured and they are the same as downstairs having a bath is difficult but they say a bath board i was thinking about a seat which goes up and down ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Naylor

A thought crossed through my mind while reading your post here. All of your planning is just great. It gives you a head start. However, when the time actually comes to take a bath, or to shower, you will find your way. You learn to adapt and work with what you have.

During one of my operations in the early years after my amputatlion, I came out of the anesthesia with a stroke. My whole left side was paralyzed for over 30 days. (I eventually, slowly regained full use.)

I had to use the toilet something fierce, and did not want another Foley catheter, or one of those leaky bed urnials. Soooo, while the nurse was out, I managed to crawl out of the bed, across the floor and onto the commode, and then back up into the bed. This was with my right leg amputated, without my prosthesis on, (bka), my left arm and side useless, and open wounds over an inch deep in my groin. Yes, I did get scolded royally for it, but I did what I had to do. I could not have thought this out ahead.

The point I'm trying to make is that if we try to think of all of our needs now, we do it by todays standards, (which is all we know). You won't know until you get there just what you can or can not do, and then you will find a way to do it.

Life goes on - albeit a little differently. If you try imagining being exactly the same, you will be disappointed. However, I think that you will be amazed at how you will be able to find new ways to do the same old things.

Your going to be just fine. I hear the determination in you. I doubt if you let very much get you down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there!

For a long time I just showered with my leg off.

One day after one of my surgery's and while having the cast removed, my husband saw a cast protector on a shelf

It's called a seal - tight cast and bandage protector - costs $29.00 canadian

It fits perfectly over the top of my prosthesis and has a seal tight ring at the top to prevent any leakage. What a thrill to stand in the shower again. I've just purchased a second one as the last one ripped. It lasted for three years :)

Hope this info will be of use to someone.

Wendy B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bath board .. Lower yourself into the bath by using the grab handles, easy. But depends on your fitness and ability.

Sit on the bath board and take a shower using a prosthetic cover, one such device is supplied by our very own Jim T who is far too modest to tell you this on the forum.

But I will

Take a look

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bath board is very nice, if you just want to take a shower. If you want a bath, there would be also some handles at the wall helpfull and a mat, which is not slippery.

When I wo to the swimming-halls (?) I just use an "unslippry" shoe and crutches. If you are later in a better condition , this may also be a way for you. Balance is then the most important thing.

Ciao Thomas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will second Jims shower cover.....I have one also. :blink::blink:

(eag)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, forgot to tell you.......I had a bedside commode.....was feeling perky after one of my surgeries & tried using it. Fell flat on my tush. :lol: :lol:

The nurse was very upset( that's putting it mildly) with me. :P :P (eag)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They brought in a walker and had me go around the bed with it and out to the hall, wore me out the first time, but they left it in the room and an hour later I decided to use it to get to the bathroom. Back on the throne after a month. :D

All was good till I had to figure out how to get back up, Took a little doing, but you figure these things out quickly. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann and Mike. Thank you for your comments. I do believe in my product, but try not to be pushy on this forum. Modest? Who - me?

Now is the time for me to say, "Your check is in the mail". :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Fill bath

2. Add bubbles and nice smelling stuff :D

3. Undress

4. Stand very close to the edge of the bath

5. Jump very high

6. Close eyes

7. Pinch nose closed with fingers

8. Splash!!!!!!

9. Giggle

10.Relax

11. Look very innocent and say things like, "I'm sorry...looks like I made a mess.", and get someone else to clean up the wet floor.

:P :P :P :P :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No splash water at the Cat :rolleyes:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A thought crossed through my mind while reading your post here. All of your planning is just great. It gives you a head start. However, when the time actually comes to take a bath, or to shower, you will find your way. You learn to adapt and work with what you have.

Hi Naylor

I think OT's have a job to do, but as Jim mentioned, once you are recovered from the surgery you really will find your own way of doing things, so I would beware of making too many expensive changes to your accommodation that you might find are later unnecessary.

With regards to the bath, you may find something quite simple, like a stool or chair alongside the bath to steady you into/out of the bath and maybe just a small grab bar the other side of the bath. A lot will depend on you and how mobile you are, if you can use this time to strengthen your upper body, that will be helpful.

Ann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GRAB BARS - GRAB BARS - GRAB BARS

I can't stress these enough. I was a General Building Contractor in So. Calif. when all of this happened 18 years ago. We specialized in the remodel of bathrooms, as well as kitchens, etc.

I have placed more grab bars in existing showers for people with two good legs, than for the handicapped.

Now that I am retired, I have remodeled our home, building a handicapped tiled shower for me, with grab bars on all three walls, (2.5 x 4 foot shower). With my bench in there, I have no problem at all standing on one leg, with my knee on the bench, and bars all around to hold on to.

I intentionally placed the toilet right in front of the shower opening, so I could kneel on the lid, and step into the shower, transferring my knee to the bench. I also have vertical grab bars on the opening. I get out by reversing that, and then sitting on the lid while I dry and put my leg back on and dress.

I feel more secure than most two legged people.

I also remodeled my wife's bathroom, building her a custom shower, and boxed and tiled in the original claw foot tub. I've placed grab bars not only in her shower, but also around the tub, and she has two perfectly good legs.

I also put them in the guest house bathroom shower (2.5x5 ft. that I built for my mother-in-law's visits.

I believe in them for everyone. You don't have to be a contractor to have these. Any reputable home improvement store will walk you through the procedure of installation. Just make sure that they are bolted directly to the studs inside the wall and they will hold all of the weight that you can put on them. I trust them completly.

This is what I mean by adapting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
one such device is supplied by our very own Jim T who is far too modest to tell you this on the forum.

But I will

Take a look

Whoa! So cool! The ONE THING I hate and detest about this amputation is sitting on a shower chair and using the hand held shower -- it just doesn't compare with the real thing!

Jim, I saw your shower protector in the ACA magazine - In Motion. I'm so humbled to meet a celeb, not to mention a rather bright guy!

Soon's I can use my leg, I'm ordering one! Huzzah for you! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aw - Gee - Shucks. Flattery will get you everywhere. Whether the flattery is deserved or not. :D :D :D :D

Whenever you are ready, just get in touch with me and we'll be glad to fix you up. Thank you. You take care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:blink: I would never resort to shameless flattery!

I've met you in another arena and enjoy your posts... glad to see you here, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you may find something quite simple, like a stool ...alongside the bath

Must've been Marcus's mystery guest that didn't quite make the toilet in time

...Or the Cat !! ;) :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Naylor, the advice here is really sound.

I have been an amputee now for just 2yrs. Looking back i realise that i could have spent money non stop on things that i thought i would need, "thought" being the "operative" word.

I got my 1st limb around about the April and did very well during the summer months but always at the back of my mind was a niggle about how i would cope in the wet and the icey winter. I worried myself so much over this that i got my hubby to take me round looking at the mobility scooters that are on the market. I would need one that would cope with ice, cobbled streets, slippy sloping streets, my imagination ran riot. My hubby really did not want me to rush into buying one, he thought i would get so used to using one that i wouldn't bother walking at all. I hung back from buying one and lo and behold i found i haven't needed one at all. I was holding myself back so much because of the fear of slipping that i wasn't willing to give myself a chance, i just needed to trust myself.

There are some things that will be invaluable to you, some things that will be a necessity, some things that you just like to use, don't rush into spending unnecessarily, try finding your own way round things first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree with the rest here. Go for the minimalist approach, particularly if you have to fund these things yourself. Disability gadgets are hugely overpriced and if you find you don't need them then you'll have wasted money that would have been better spent on other things.

The things I needed in the early days were a bathboard, crutches and or a zimmer frame. If you've been shown how to raise and lower yourself using crutches then it should be fairly easy to use the toilet. If you're less steady on your good leg then the Zimmer frame might be the better option. Getting in the bath depends on where the taps are in relation to your stump. As an example my taps are on my left as I face the side of the bath so I have to slide my stump side onto the bath board then steadying myself bring my left leg into the bath (this is much easier since I moved house as I have rails fitted on the bath and the wall). Once on the board I can lower myself into the bath using my arms to support my weight. Getting out is pretty much the reverse of getting in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GRAB BARS - GRAB BARS - GRAB BARS

I can't stress these enough. 

Couldn't agree more. My bath has those 'built in' handle thingeys. Definitely have to have something like that to hang onto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a LAK and prefer showers over baths. I can stand long enough for a quick shower, but I like to stay in longer than most. I use a cheap little shower stool that is hard plastic so I added a little foam pad that is for gardening. It's much easier on the butt :) and doesn't soak up any water, etc. I just rinse it off and hang it up when I'm finished. Cost $3 at the hardware store.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to be different...I hate showers & I just love baths. :) It's probably because I'm a bit of a 'water baby'...but it's also probably because I'm bilateral & I use 'having a bath' as part of my pain management.

I have one grab rail, but because I've had lots of practice, if I have to, I can use a bath without a grab rail...:blink:

Lizzie :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well lizzie,

experience and some body strengh is very important in all situations. ;)

when u are in your bathtub you swim then your 1000 meters there? :lol:

ciao thomas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
well lizzie,

experience and some body strengh is very important in all situations...when u are in your bathtub you swim then your 1000 meters there? :D

I wish!!! My bath is not that big! :(

Anyway, it's 2000m. :blink:

Lizzie :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi chaps,

I fitted a new bathroom to suit me (needed one anyway pre accident ). I went to the bath showroom in my wheelchair (pre pros) and had a go at climbing in and out of them all!!! Phew!!! Anyway, upshot of it is, I got one of those corner baths with the little built in seat in the corner, it works well because I can get out of the bath in stages. I pull myself onto the corner seat and pull the plug (drying my upper body as the water drains away) then pop my leg back on and stand to climb out! hey presto! easy peasy :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×