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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
caroln

How far do you go?

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I just received my first prosthesis today and I'm not really sure how far to push things. My prosthetisist(sp) said just to do everyday things, but after sitting on my rear for the past 7 years I'm not sure what that is. I should have asked when I was there.

For those of you that have been through this, as long as it doesn't hurt, is it ok to walk around? My house is kind of small so I thought I might walk the halls at school tomorrow night where I have some room to roam. Sound like an ok plan or am I moving too fast? I'm anxious to get going but I don't want to mess anything up and end up back in a wheelchair or with a walker.

I'd appreciate whatever advice you can give me. I can't express enough how valuable this site has been to me. I live in a very small town in NW Minnesota and often feel alone in all this. All of you help me leave that behind and feel accepted. Thank you.

Caroln

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I would say let your leg dictate how far to go. If it hurts or you develop blisters then you might be pushing yourself too hard. Your residual limb will change shape while it gets used to your new prosthesis and that will also take some time.

There are also some exercises you can do to strengthen the required muscles. Has anyone given you any of these?

Good Luck!

Mandy

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Caroln,

I had my leg revised almost 15 months ago and when I got my first check socket I so wanted to walk that I pushed things a little to fast. Your prosthetist should have told you to limit the time of wearing the leg. Start out wearing the leg for an hour in the morning then an hour in the afternoon or evening then increase the time every day or so. As for walking do short walks maybe the length of your hall way at home or even around your kitchen you should probably use crutches for a little while then go to one then to maybe a cane then to no assitive device at all. Do you have PT? Make sure you are building your muscles up in your glutes and quads very important. Take small steps and keep an eye on your residual limb (stump) watch for blisters, wounds or anything that doesn't look normal.

Patients, Patients, Patients then Practice, Practice, Practice.

The reason for my advies is I set myself back twice because of wanting to walk so bad.

Brenda

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Hi Caroln,

I am so pleased for you, after all those years and now to be walking, it must seem wonderful to you. With me, the first thing I had to learn was to take it nice an slow. To rush things may only cause a setback and you certainly don't want that to happen. Each day your body will let you know how much, if any more, that you should be doing at that point and time. I guess the most important thing is, to listen to your body and the rest will all come together. Good Luck

Sheila

Keep Smiling :)

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Hi Caroln,

I'm pleased that you now have your leg.

The other replies give very good advice.

When I got my first leg, I got home with it and looked at it and wondered what to do? So I started to 'do' daily things, but was wary of 'pushing' myself. Now, when I get up, as well as thinking about what to wear, I also think of what I'm going to do that day. So depending on what I'm going to do, I have the choice of doing it in my wheelchair, on crutches or with my leg.

A bonus I found in only having one leg was painting the skirting board in my toilet. Which is very small., and made it easy to do.

The only advice apart from using 'common sense' was learn to get up off the floor! This from the Clinic Doc and prosthesist.

Be wary of fatigue, I think amps use 200% more energy/effort to walk the same distance as people with two legs. I have a problem with fatigue, so plan carefully where and when I use my leg.

Best as...

Steve

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