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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
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naylor

cavitys in stump

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hi there folks went to wound care clinic yesterday they found two cavitys in my stump they put a probe up them and released a lot of fluid they have put something like velcro with silver in the to promote healing they say they cannot say whether it will heal or not the district nurses have been dressing it wrong hope fully it will heal now they have released some fliund i was afraid that they said it would have to go above knee but they said they cannot say that has any one else had anything of this sort if so please send me your messages

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Hi Ian

It doesn't sound too good at the moment, does it? I'm glad you've got the best of care - your district nurses sound as though they know exactly what they're doing. Also, you're in the best place too - at home. :) All I can say is to just try and keep smiling...and to keep letting us know how you're getting on.

Take care

Lizzie :)

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hi there folks went to wound care clinic yesterday they found two cavity's in my stump they put a probe up them and released a lot of fluid they have put something like velcro with silver in the to promote healing they say they cannot say whether it will heal or not the district nurses have been dressing it wrong hope fully it will heal now they have released some fliund i was afraid that they said it would have to go above knee but they said they cannot say that has any one else had anything of this sort if so please send me your messages

Hi naylor,

Following my post amp infection (MRSA) and subsequent further surgery, it was discovered that I too had two very deep tracts (sinuses) which, if they had not healed would have resulted in further surgery and possible above the knee amputation.

These tracts were so deep that a probe pushed into the hole would pass right through beyond the bone and almost the full depth of the residual limb.

The main concern was that they healed from the bottom up-wards, and not close over at the top leaving a site for further infection.

My consultant was so concerned about this, that he personally devised the procedure for the nurses to follow in dressing these.

Every day the nurse would take a length of ribbon gauze, soak it in betadine (antiseptic) and pack the tracts using a probe to push the gauze right down to the very bottom. This was acting as an antiseptic wick, capillary draining any remaining gunge out of there and thus preventing any further infection.

In the early stages it hurt like hell and I needed to have morphine in order to withstand the pain.

This procedure was done every day for a month, but such was the concern that they got right to the bottom of these tracts that I manged to cope with the pain.

Eventually it became obvious that the tracts were healing and remaining infection free, eventually so little gauze was being inserted that we were able to discontinue the dressing and let them heal over, and now everything is fine.

I'm thankful to my consultant for his prompt action, and with hindsight I have to say a month of pain was a small price to pay to keep my knee.

The point I'm trying to make is:

It's very important that someone in the care staff is aware of the consequences of getting this wrong and you need to be absolutely certain that the correct treatment is being given. Ask some questions, find out exactly what they are trying to do, and what they expect the results to be, if needs be, kick up a fuss until you are satisfied.

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The main concern was that they healed from the bottom up-wards, and not close over at the top leaving a site for further infection.

My consultant was so concerned about this, that he personally devised the procedure for the nurses to follow in dressing these.

Every day the nurse would take a length of ribbon gauze, soak it in betadine (antiseptic) and pack the tracts using a probe to push the gauze right down to the very bottom. This was acting as an antiseptic wick, capillary draining any remaining gunge out of there and thus preventing any further infection.

Hi Mike

With any deep sited soft tissue infection, it's important to ensure that healing takes place from the base of the lesion upwards, otherwise (as you quite rightly said) it's very easy for the skin to heal and a pocket of infection to form underneath.

There are quite a few treatments (and new ones are being developed all the time) that healthcare professionals can use to treat lesions such as these and every area/hospital/consultant/GP practice/individual practitioner has their own way of treating them. I've personally found that frequency of dressing changes is one of the keys to ensuring that the lesion quickly resolves - once you get that right, the rest seems to follow.

Lizzie :)

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Hi Naylor

In reading Mike's and Lizzie's posts, I can not think of any better advice.

I have had my right groin opened 8 times, and my left 4, going down inside to the femoral arteries, (a good inch or two into the groin). Each time, they left the wound open so that it would heal from the bottom up, for just the reeasons that they have given.

For almost a month I would take the old gauze out each day, clean the wound with peroxide (OUCH!), and then repack it. (Just to make this more fun, we had lost our home and contracting business due to hospital bills, since our insurance was unexpectedly cancelled when they discovered that I was having problems.) Soooo, all of this was done while living in a little 17 foot camping trailer that we owned.

All of this was after the amputation.

And yes, I did have staph infections. (Quite a few actually.) The last one that almost got me went from my groin down into my popliteal artery (behind the knee), and from the groin up INTO my aorta. (I know, I know, why did the dye show going in, and no blood coming out? Doctors said that a flap of skin kept it from bleeding out.) Anyway, I saw pictures of the dye going in.

I don't know how much of this is relevant to your case. I think I was just walking down memory lane. A place that I don't like to go to very often.

My opinion - It is best to listen to your doctors orders.... completely. Improper care can be very disastrous.

Oh yes. I contracted the staph IN THE HOSPITAL, each and every time.

Ain't life grand? Now you know why I value and enjoy it so much today. (As we all do.)

Like one young lady recently said in here introduction ......."I survived". But, there were times.... just barely.

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the nurses are pushing up the aquacell ribbonfrom the bottom of my stump so i would imagine it would heal from the inside outwards wouldn,t it folks

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the nurses are pushing up the aquacell ribbonfrom the bottom of my stump so i would imagine it would heal from the inside outwards wouldn,t it folks

Aquacel is a hydrocolloid dressing, Ian. You need to keep hydrocolloid dressings in place for a minimum number of days, to allow the dressing to do it's job...which is soaking up all the mucky stuff. The mucky stuff needs to be moved away from your wound (which is what the dressing does) so that it can heal from the bottom upwards. It's exactly what I would have expected your district nurses to use. :)

Take care

Lizzie :)

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Guest bearlover

Good grieff! Hope your doing ok. I have never head of that. So thanks for the warning, Please take care. Happy your doing ok! :(

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