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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
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MNaverickR6

Can i still drive

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I hope some one can help me.....

Im new to all this and am facing the fact that my right leg has to go below the knee. How will this affect my driving??

Can i drive with my replacement limb??? or do i have to use my left foot??? can you get a hand throttle??? loads questions but can anyone help??

Thank you :D

Essex, UK

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I too am a right leg amputee and tried to find out about driving. I was told that it is out of the question, the only way is have hand controls fitted as obviously there is no feeling in the 'new leg'!

I don't know what your financial situation is, but I gather hand control adaptations are rather expensive.

Sorry this is probably not much help, this is just my experience, others might have different answers.

Good luck, let us know how you get on. I am just over the river in Kent so maybe I shall give you a wave one of these days!

Best wishes - Rosemarie

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I have been a RBK for 36 years when I first learned how to drive I didn't think I would be able to use my right leg. I opted to drive left footed and the Motor Vehicle office put a restriction of Automatic Transmission only on my license when I first got it at the age of 18. I drove for a few years with my left foot then got brave and tried with my right foot and have been driving that way since. I also learned how to drive a standard shift car and went back to the Motor Vehicle office retook my test and they removed my restriction. There are accelerator adaptions that you adapt on the left side of the pedal so you can drive that way. If you already have a license I wouldn't say anything and keep driving unless there is a problem with that in your country.

Best of luck and let us know what you end up doing.

Brenda

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Hi, I'm not a RBK, but my friend I worked with is and she drives all the time, going everywhere, winter and summer, wearing her limb. The only thing she ever mentioned was, that at first you have to be rather careful as to how much pressure you apply to the accelarator. Saying, once she learned that, which I'm sure you will also, there was no problem what so ever. Good Luck!

Sheila

Keep Smiling :)

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I'm a LBK and so it was fine for me to drive a normal automatic car - when i first got my leg I didn't even wear it when driving. Anyway I'm not entirely sure but when I was at my limb centre last I was talking to a lady RBK and she had an automatic car with an adaption on the pedals which moved the accelerator from right to left meaning she could use her left foot.

I'm sure there are lots of different ways to go about modifying a car but there is no doubt about it you can still drive. Maybe if you talk to an Occupational Therapist or someone like that, they maybe able to help.

Kate :D

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I am RAK and drive an automatic transmission with my left foot - no adaptations. The posture is probably not the best so I may get an accelerator adaptor fitted to the left of the brake. I tried driving with my prosthesis and the difficult part is getting smooth pressure going on the accelerator. Being AK the movement comes from my hip - somewhat tiring! So being lazy I decided to use my left leg. I think it will be easier for BK amps. My uncle is BK and even drives a manual.

Best Wishes

Mandy

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Hi

Not sure of what is required in UK by DVLA, in relation to loosing the right/left leg.

I am a bilateral b/k amp. and have driven since the age of 18. I was advised by the DVLA that I had to drive with hand controls, at that time an automatic was the easiest option (with hand controls) and have driven that way ever since, and it is stipulated on my driving licence. My hand controls cost round about Two to three hundred pounds, and these days it is very easy to get them fitted.

If you are in the ok, you should be able to get advice from the limbless assoc. or motability. both are on the web.

I understand that Motability will give help with the cost of hand controls to certain individuals, but I am not sure of the procedure.

Good luck

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Hi MN,

Welcome to the site, pleased to meet you.

Sorry to hear of your situation. But you've come to the right place for help and support.

BTW, hows Essex? I moved from there 7 years ago to Cornwall.

I am a right above knee amp.

Firstly as I understand driving licences, you have to notify DVLA if you have a disibility that 'affects' your ability to drive. But check this out with DVLA.

Secondly, you can have the foot pedals of an automatic changed over. However, there have been many accidents caused by the confusion of this. It costs about £200-£300.

Third, hand controls.

I myself drive using my left foot, and have done so for many years. Without any problems or accidents. When I lost the use of my right leg, I had an automatic at the time, I went with my son to an industrial estate early evenings and at weekends and learnt to use my left foot. Once I was confident, I started driving on the 'roads' still with my son with me. And have never looked back.

Sometimes I drive with my leg on and sometimes without it.

Another point, if you purchase a car and have adaptions, you may be able to qualify for nil Vat on the purchase price of the car. Saving 17.5% of the price of the car. Ask a dealer about this.

I hope this and the other replies are of help to you.

Any probs or questions just post, there are a lot of 'experienced' amps here, willing and able to help.

Best regards

Steve

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People ask me that question all the time, and I have never understood why. I'm an AK and I drive with the left food. I pull my right knee in and put the left one down, no problemo.

You don't need a big car to do this with either. I drove a Dodge Intrepid for a few months and HATED, can I repeat HATED? HATED it. The position wasn't all the comfortable, and teh steering wheel was so close to my leg that I would occasionally smash my fingers. I opp for a Toyota Corolla or Honda Civic. Why, the bucket seat just works better for some reason and I don't have to pull the steering wheel down as far.

Point is, if you have one leg, it's not even something to worry about!

Nicole B)

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Hi there! I lost my right leg 8 years ago! I drive with a left foot accelerator. It's a gas pedal mounted to a base on the floor and a bar runs from it onto the original gas pedal - as you push down on the left one it depresses the original gas pedal. I brake with my left foot also. i hated driving with my prosthesis - I couldn't tell where my foor was. The pedal pops out by pushing a button so others can drive my car, and inserts very easily. it cost around $250.00 -$300.00 canadian. Hope this is of help. Wendy :)

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Driving an un-modified car (assuming an automatic) with your left leg is not recomended, although it is possible to do. The big problem comes when you have to brake in a hurry - because of the angle you will most likely get your left foot caught behind the brake pedal - this is not a good thing!

I am a RBK and I currently drive with left foot accelerator pedal. Both pedals are hinged, so that either the left or right pedal can be folded out of the way. Although I can drive with my right foot, there is no much feeling there and would not like to drive in heavy traffic until I have had more practice at this.

I have also driven some manual cars (stick shift for those from the US) but at present I am nt legally allowed to.

It would pay to check with your local Drivers Licence Authority as no doubt your insurance company would use any excuse to weasel out of any claim if you did have an accident.

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