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Right Around the Corner, Roz!

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:rolleyes::rolleyes: Roz, I can't believe the way you are taking this bump in the road...you have guts of steel (that's not very nice to tell a woman) but it's true. I am sooooo proud of you.....I know you will be trucking around in the very near future.

:D :D :D

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Hi Roz

Fantastic effort girl.

You're bringing back memories - I'd forgotten-the bed pan stories. Remind me to tell you a few when all this is over. We'll have a good laugh. Their right about the catheta-it's best to avoid it if possible.

My thoughts are with you-you're doing a remarkable job.

I'm also glad to hear that the food is ok-I'd even be tempted to ship something for here :D NOt sure what condition in would be in went it got there but............. Still as long as you can try to eat something.

Keep up the great work; my thoguhts are with you

Mel.

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Hi Folks!

Amputation Diary – Day 3!

Thanks again for your support - it's really appreciated, especially after the day I've had today!

I was just settling down to sleep last night when I felt liquid trickling down my back – my epidural had come out! Ulp!

I knew I was in for a rough time, and as I waited for doctors to come and inspect things, I was aware of my pain levels rising rapidly and the numbness in my good leg fading… I began to feel phantom limb pain developing – the sensation that my amputated heel was being crushed – so I began massaging my stump, which was rapidly regaining normal sensation. The crushing sensation went away, but the overall pain level was damned high and getting higher, so I decided to work off the pain and frustration – I jumped into my wheelchair and started wheeling myself around the corridors as fast as I could! It really helped a lot, as did a good strong cup of tea!

The duty doctor eventually appeared and prescribed me some Tramadol. It took the edge off the pain, but made me feel sick and dizzy.

The anaesthetist came and confirmed that the epidural cannula had come out by half its length and was no longer in the epidural space, and it could not be fixed – I’d need a new one. He promised to schedule me for a new one the following day, and he also recommended some other strong painkillers (Oxycontin, Oxynorm, plus an anti-sickness IV) to tide me through the night. Even with these drugs, though, I was in a massive amount of pain, and I didn’t sleep a wink…

The following morning I saw a succession of anaesthetists – firstly one from the team who put my pre-op epidural in; then about an hour later there was a young woman doctor whose sole aim seemed to be denying me a new epidural!

She said that the hospital did not routinely re-site epidurals, that there were risks associated with doing so, and that it was their policy to offer alternative kinds of analgesia if an epidural failed. All of that sounded reasonable, but then she ruined her credibility by trying to suggest that I’d had the prescribed 72-hour epidural for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, which meant I’d had it as long as I’d been supposed to, when I’d only had it for Thursday and half of Friday, and then, without even asking me about my pain, she said that I looked “comfortable” and didn’t need an epidural! I most certainly was not comfortable, and I told her so in no uncertain terms! She reiterated that all she could offer me was IV or oral analgesia, but by now I suspected that she was just trying to impress her consultant by clearing a job off the list!

Because none of the oral drugs had been even a quarter as effective as the epidural, I told her that her offer was not acceptable, and that I knew for sure that epidurals could be re-sited, and that I wanted her to take my refusal of her offer back to her consultant, and get back to me; it was very gratifying to see her arrogance turn into obedience! A little later the senior consultant came, and after I explained my surgeon’s wishes and my intolerance for opiates, he quickly granted me a new epidural, which was given within 30 minutes.

Here’s where it gets interesting! Because I wasn’t sedated, I could speak to the doctor about the epidural. I explained how it had come out, and he mentioned that an epidural installed for surgery was only secured sufficiently for the duration of the surgery, not for the rigours of being conscious and moving about in a bed on a ward. He said that he would make this one extra-secure! I also mentioned that the nurse hadn’t cleaned my skin so the dressings could not have adhered properly, and he joked about drenching me with alcohol this time, sadly not Veuve Cliquot!

In the light of the foregoing, I think that anyone contemplating an epidural should make sure that the anaesthetists understand that it must be sufficiently well-secured to withstand the rigours of moving about in bed, which are far more demanding than surgery.

It was very informative to experience how much better an epidural is than oral analgesics – I would say probably more than 5 times better. With the epidural I could perform my physiotherapy exercises and move about the bed with ease, whereas the oral alternative gave virtual immobility due to pain.

So, 12 hours after my painful ordeal began, I was wheeled back to the ward with a new, well-secured epidural – but another calamity awaited me! After I’d been on the ward for about 12 hours, I moved in the bed and there was a little “Pop!” sound, and the tube feeding the epidural cannula came apart! As it had happened above the bacterial filter, my new epidural was no longer sterile, and would have to come out! It appears that someone hadn’t quite tightened the union between the tubes properly… Oh well – I guess I was only meant to have 48 hours of epidural!

I’ve now got a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump instead, containing fentanyl, as opposed to morphine, and, combined with the fact that my wound has settled down a lot during the extra 12 hours of epidural, it seems pretty good at controlling my pain.

To be honest, I’m relieved to be free of the epidural; the degree of pain relief is astonishingly good, but it’s proven to be catastrophically fragile in 2 ways, and it means being stuck in the bed, which is boring – and also dangerous when there are bedpans involved! With the PCA, I can use a proper toilet, and go exploring whenever the urge takes me!

Phew! What a day!

Tune in tomorrow for another (less) gripping episode (I hope)!!!

Best wishes

Roz.:)

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Hi Folks!

Amputation Diary – Day 3!

Thanks again for your support - it's really appreciated, especially after the day I've had today!

I was just settling down to sleep last night when I felt liquid trickling down my back – my epidural had come out! Ulp!

I knew I was in for a rough time, and as I waited for doctors to come and inspect things, I was aware of my pain levels rising rapidly and the numbness in my good leg fading… I began to feel phantom limb pain developing – the sensation that my amputated heel was being crushed – so I began massaging my stump, which was rapidly regaining normal sensation. The crushing sensation went away, but the overall pain level was damned high and getting higher, so I decided to work off the pain and frustration – I jumped into my wheelchair and started wheeling myself around the corridors as fast as I could! It really helped a lot, as did a good strong cup of tea!

The duty doctor eventually appeared and prescribed me some Tramadol. It took the edge off the pain, but made me feel sick and dizzy.

The anaesthetist came and confirmed that the epidural cannula had come out by half its length and was no longer in the epidural space, and it could not be fixed – I’d need a new one. He promised to schedule me for a new one the following day, and he also recommended some other strong painkillers (Oxycontin, Oxynorm, plus an anti-sickness IV) to tide me through the night. Even with these drugs, though, I was in a massive amount of pain, and I didn’t sleep a wink…

The following morning I saw a succession of anaesthetists – firstly one from the team who put my pre-op epidural in; then about an hour later there was a young woman doctor whose sole aim seemed to be denying me a new epidural!

She said that the hospital did not routinely re-site epidurals, that there were risks associated with doing so, and that it was their policy to offer alternative kinds of analgesia if an epidural failed. All of that sounded reasonable, but then she ruined her credibility by trying to suggest that I’d had the prescribed 72-hour epidural for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, which meant I’d had it as long as I’d been supposed to, when I’d only had it for Thursday and half of Friday, and then, without even asking me about my pain, she said that I looked “comfortable” and didn’t need an epidural! I most certainly was not comfortable, and I told her so in no uncertain terms! She reiterated that all she could offer me was IV or oral analgesia, but by now I suspected that she was just trying to impress her consultant by clearing a job off the list!

Because none of the oral drugs had been even a quarter as effective as the epidural, I told her that her offer was not acceptable, and that I knew for sure that epidurals could be re-sited, and that I wanted her to take my refusal of her offer back to her consultant, and get back to me; it was very gratifying to see her arrogance turn into obedience! A little later the senior consultant came, and after I explained my surgeon’s wishes and my intolerance for opiates, he quickly granted me a new epidural, which was given within 30 minutes.

Here’s where it gets interesting! Because I wasn’t sedated, I could speak to the doctor about the epidural. I explained how it had come out, and he mentioned that an epidural installed for surgery was only secured sufficiently for the duration of the surgery, not for the rigours of being conscious and moving about in a bed on a ward. He said that he would make this one extra-secure! I also mentioned that the nurse hadn’t cleaned my skin so the dressings could not have adhered properly, and he joked about drenching me with alcohol this time, sadly not Veuve Cliquot!

In the light of the foregoing, I think that anyone contemplating an epidural should make sure that the anaesthetists understand that it must be sufficiently well-secured to withstand the rigours of moving about in bed, which are far more demanding than surgery.

It was very informative to experience how much better an epidural is than oral analgesics – I would say probably more than 5 times better. With the epidural I could perform my physiotherapy exercises and move about the bed with ease, whereas the oral alternative gave virtual immobility due to pain.

So, 12 hours after my painful ordeal began, I was wheeled back to the ward with a new, well-secured epidural – but another calamity awaited me! After I’d been on the ward for about 12 hours, I moved in the bed and there was a little “Pop!” sound, and the tube feeding the epidural cannula came apart! As it had happened above the bacterial filter, my new epidural was no longer sterile, and would have to come out! It appears that someone hadn’t quite tightened the union between the tubes properly… Oh well – I guess I was only meant to have 48 hours of epidural!

I’ve now got a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump instead, containing fentanyl, as opposed to morphine, and, combined with the fact that my wound has settled down a lot during the extra 12 hours of epidural, it seems pretty good at controlling my pain.

To be honest, I’m relieved to be free of the epidural; the degree of pain relief is astonishingly good, but it’s proven to be catastrophically fragile in 2 ways, and it means being stuck in the bed, which is boring – and also dangerous when there are bedpans involved! With the PCA, I can use a proper toilet, and go exploring whenever the urge takes me!

Phew! What a day!

Tune in tomorrow for another (less) gripping episode (I hope)!!!

Best wishes

Roz.:)

Wow! you have really had it. Keep your chin up. Good luck.

JudyH

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Guest bearlover

Hope you have a better day tomorrw...Better days are ahead this is not a easy thing to go through. It is not a band-aide surgery..I'm a LKB for 3 years this past July....I'm just now feeling better and mocing around better..BUT! I had many set backs, I got real sick because I pushed myself to hard...So be careful not to do that....Take care and keep us infourmed ;)

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Hi all;

I need some advice, please!

I'm trying to do the physiotherapy exercises set for me, and when I do the bending and straightening of my stump (at the knee), I get a lot of pain where my heel used to be.

Interestingly, it happens a lot less if I gently squeeze my stump with both hands while I'm bending and straightening.

Any thoughts or advice? While the squeezing is lessening my pain, do you feel it's a good thing or a bad thing to be doing?

Also, while PCA Fetanyl seems to work quite well in killing my pain, I had some horrible nightmares last night! Has anyone else had this, and if so, was there a cure, or did you have to change the type of painkiller you were on?

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts!

Best wishes

Roz.:)

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Hi Roz,

I hope you can get a good nights sleep.

The first problem sounds like nerve pain to me. I'm not too sure. They do take a little while to settle if it is that and the stretching maybe pulling on internal stitches. It's just a guess.

The nightmares though........well I certainly do blame the meds for those-mine were very graphic to say the least and I was not in much of a position to have them changed. It didn't make much difference to me which meds I took I still had them for quite some time. Once I was off the endone, tramadol amitryp etc they ceased, but you can't give up for pain meds for the sake of them. They also made me feel teary at times I was happy-not sure what the go was there. Once I hit rehab started reducing the doses it made a huge difference. There were times I didn';t even know where I was.

I really hope they settle down. Can you increase your fluids to try to flush them through?

I think you're amazing and going a fantastic job

If your not sure of something-make sure you ask and tell them what's concerning you.

Mel.

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Roz

My hats off to you! You are quite the "gutsy" lady!

Both my wife and I were on high levels of painkillers and they do tend to give you hallucinations and nightmares. In my experience, Fentanyl is not as problematic as Morphine. As an example, I thought I spent a pleasant day in Baghdad, lunching with friends and seeing the sights. Seemed real, wasn't!

Unfortunately, it all seems to "come with the territory". Sometimes small reductions in medication can give relief from the "strange stuff", but it may come at the cost of increased pain. Talk to your doctors, but keep that pain down!

Also, while PCA Fetanyl seems to work quite well in killing my pain, I had some horrible nightmares last night! Has anyone else had this, and if so, was there a cure, or did you have to change the type of painkiller you were on?

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts!

Best wishes

Roz.:)

Just so you know, you just went on my "Heroes" list.

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Roz,

You have been run through the mill! You have a great positive attitude. I sure hope the worst is over for you now.

Take care.

Carol

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Hi All;

Thanks again for your support and feedback!

It dawned on me today that even though I’ve known many of you for some time, I’ve really only just become a proper “newbie”. That must mean that all my previous posts constitute the longest introduction ever!

As today was Monday, it was back to normal routine on the ward, which meant seeing the physiotherapist for the first time since I was just 1 day post-op, and still on the epidural. When I zoomed past her in my wheelchair on my way to the bathroom, she remarked with some surprise that I was out of bed – and before I could stop myself, I said it: “Oh, I’ve been using the wheelchair since Friday night, when my epidural came out!”

The colour drained from her face; I’m sure she was imagining the consequences of an unenlightened patient trying something naively horrific, such as a wheelchair on stairs! I reasoned that I’d never get away with bending the rules again unless I could show that I’d done it to cartoon-esque extremes and survived unscathed, so, demonstrating a distinct lack of new fractures and abrasions, I told her all about hurtling through the corridors to work off the pain of losing my first epidural. She only seemed to start breathing normally again when I was entirely cooperative in performing all my exercises flawlessly!

Today also, the last two patients who had pre-dated my admission were discharged – a wonderful London matriarch who’d been visited by 4 generations of cheerful and obedient descendants, and a lunatic Australian girl with a brilliant wry wit – we’d become great pals. It now fell to me to perform duty as the post-operative patient ambassador for the new admissions, assuring them that none of their routine hip or knee replacements were likely to result in a BK like mine!

Speaking of which, my stump is extremely neat. The dressings were changed yesterday, and there’s a nice straight suture line across the front, where the calf muscle wraps forward over the bone bridge. There doesn’t seem to be much swelling at all – it’s only a little larger than it was before the op, but the suture line is very sensitive! There are 2 places that result in quite strong sensations, a couple of which seem to be in my “foot”. As Ally has said, I’m reasoning that the sensory nerves are pretty confused, and in combination with the inflammation of the tissue, they seem prepared shout any “error message” they can think of, even if it’s incorrect – very much like my computer!

Pain is mild to moderate – I’m still trying to take as few shots of IV Fentanyl as possible, as doing this yesterday kept the nightmares at bay. I’m taking the Paracetamol which are being offered every 4 hours, but, unsurprisingly, I suppose, it’s not making much of a dent in the pain. Keeping busy or preoccupying myself with music or movies seems to really help, as does the scent of the lovely flowers from some wonderful persons (bless you, M!). Gentle stroking also helps, from the end of my stump upwards – the nerves seem to stop yelling in a loud, multi-voiced discord, and quietly pay attention to the sensation – well, most of them do!

OK – it’s movie time! Tonight I hope I’m not going to wake the other patients as I stifle guffaws watching Austin Powers in Goldmember!

Best wishes

Roz. :)

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Hi All;

Today I had a Significant Post-op Phantom Limb Pain Event! It was really extreme, and I would really welcome your advice please!!!

This morning I had the dressings changed on my RBK, for the second time since the amputation last Thursday. I knew from the first dressing change that there is a sensitive area on the suture line that, when touched, caused jarring sensations in my phantom foot, and I explained the existence of this sensitive point to the nurse removing the dressings, and to my surgeon who was present.

I braced myself for a bit of unpleasant phantom sensation as the dressings were removed again, but I was entirely unprepared for the feeling I got!

It suddenly felt as if a bunch of maybe 7 or 8 small chisels had been smashed into the outside of my heel, and then dragged forward under great pressure, lacerating the bone and flesh. My blood-curdling scream must have ruined mid-morning tea for numerous local residents, as well as the whole hospital!

My surgeon explained how carefully he had dissected all the nerves and had stretched them all before cutting them, and he was happy that they were all separate and well-retracted from the wound. He said that it seems there is still a healthy connection from the incision to the lateral peroneal nerve, which is responsible for sensations in the heel area I’d described. He also said that the fibular end of the bone bridge is in the vicinity of the peroneal nerve, but that the nerve end should be away from it. He said he was confident that this sensitive point will settle down.

I later discovered that the sensitive point which triggers the extreme sensations is right in the centre of the suture line, not above the place where the peroneal nerve runs, near the fibula.

Now, I’m well aware that it’s early days (Day 6, actually), but what are your thoughts on what I’ve described? Have any of you experienced such an extreme phantom pain soon after surgery, and, if so, did it settle down? If it did settle, how long did it take? If it only partially settled down, what phantom sensations have you been left with?

Other than that, even though it’s an Ertl, the surgery looks exactly like the pictures I’ve seen of other “long posterior flap” trans-tibial amputations. The suture line is impressively gory, with bits of soft tissue bulging out between the stitches, but it’s not weeping or bleeding – the buzz-word is that it looks “over-granulated”! With the bandages on, I think it looks kind-of cute, like an elephant’s foot, and I might even draw some elephant’s toenails on my new dressings!

In general, my stump only aches a little, it tolerates supporting the weight of my leg when rested on my wheelchair’s stump-board, and I can sleep on either side without a problem. It doesn’t hurt much when I stand up and the blood rushes down. I’ve even accidentally kicked it with my good foot, and bashed it on my stump-board when folded in the up-position, and it hasn’t punished me back! The only area of concern is the place in the suture line that’s like a “switch” for insane amounts of phantom pain; your thoughts on this would be very welcome.

I’ll be leaving hospital tomorrow after lunch, so the OTs and Physiotherapists have been hounding me all day with all sorts of tasks and techniques! I’ve also had the Fentanyl PCA machine taken away, and I’m now on Oxynorm and Oxycontin, both as needed, with nausea controlled by Ondansitron, and Paracetamol as a constant background analgesic.

I’m getting quite good in the wheelchair! Losing the cannula from my hand has meant that I can now wear cycling gloves, which makes using the wheelchair much easier and more comfort able, but, crucially, today I discovered the secret of leaning forward into each propulsive turn of the wheels, using my weight as well as my arm muscles to propel me – much easier!

To my surprise, I’m not allowed to use crutches, as doing so would apparently get me into bad habits which would compromise learning to walk with a prosthesis. Has anyone used the “OneCrutch”? That seems interesting!

I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

Very best wishes

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Roz, you are incredible! You are so strong and so positive. I look forward to your updates now. Heck, reading them makes ME feel better. Thanks and respect. :D :D

Ok, back to earth... ;)

I have had alot of phantom pains since immediately after my amputation(LAK). In the beginning, my extreme pains would start around 8 pm and last til I literally passed out, many nights. This lasted for about three months. But then, over a period of @2 weeks, the pains sort of tapered off. I still have some "episodes", but even these are less extreme and very short lived. In short, life is good again. I hope to never go there again. :) I do think I was maybe an extreme case. Something that helped later on was Amitriptyline. I definitely wish I had tried that sooner. :rolleyes:

My scar line looks like a little smiling whale, but not near so big as in the beggining, :lol: I drew eyes on it once.

Ok, you're the first to know that, so keep it on the down low! ;)

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Hi Roz,

Firstly can I say that I am really really impressed with the way you are dealing with all this.

I couldn't even look at, never mind touch, my stump for at least 6 weeks after my operation. They used to have to put me under general anaesthetic for all my dressing changes because I just couldn't cope with having it done while I was awake. I still have problems touching my stump even now. In fact, I don't. Ever. The fact that you can massage it etc is really a great indication of how well you are coping.

Anyway, now to the phantom pain. I don't know about phantom pain because I was never really able to separate this from proper pain in my leg, but from what I can remember it was really really bad for about three weeks or a month. After that the worst was over but I continued having pain for about four months. It did all go away eventually though, and I don't get any now which I know is a complete godsend.

I also, like you, have one spot on my stump that is completely hypersensitive and I think because of this feeling that there are a lot of nerves around that point that maybe my doctors didn't recede as they meant to. I can't remember whether it hurt immediately after my operation or not, but it certainly doesn't now. I can't touch it because it literally makes me jump out of my chair if I do, but it is not aggravated at all by my prosthetic leg and so I don't find it is anything to worry about.

So, in short, my advice to you Roz is that it is very early days for you, you are doing tremendously well, in fact I am in awe of how well you have taken it all. The pain you are having will probably last a bit longer but don't worry about it - I am sure it wil go away in its own time, and you will be walking pain free again before you know it.

Take care,

Fiona

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Rox, I can't believe how well you are handling all this...just head on. You are doing a tremendous job of trying to keep everything in perspective and getting on with things.

You are an inspiration to everyone.

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Hi everyone;

Once again, your comments are just too flattering! Before I found the forum I didn’t know how to handle all this, but it was all your stories that showed me how – you should be congratulating yourselves, because you’ve led me by your examples.

Well, an era has ended - I left hospital today, and am now safely tucked up in bed at a good friend’s apartment, exactly halfway between the hospital and my home. After being driven 128 miles with a fresh stump, I think I’ll sleep well!

I can’t believe how excellent everything was at The North Hampshire Hospital! In addition to having my chosen surgeon, all the other staff were not only the epitome of hard work, team work, and proficiency, but they also all enjoyed a good laugh; I’m amazed that I only had to get militant once (to get my 2nd epidural), but even that hiccup didn’t seriously delay them doing the right thing for me. They, too, lead by example – it’s evident what a great team they are, and they have a “hands-off” approach that encourages one to join in and be self-motivated in the common pursuit of excellence, but those who aren’t committed to recovery are soon martialled into shape! It was such a privilege being involved with these excellent people that I shed a tear on leaving my newest friends! I can’t wait to go back and meet up with them all again when I’m bouncing around on a new leg!

I guess I’m into that most arduous phase now – awaiting healing… My stump is generally fine – it aches when I stand up and the blood rushes into it, it aches a little when it feels like it, but I’ve not been zapped, burned, or crushed, even though there are occasional creepy sensations on my “foot”; if they don’t go away by being ignored, I gently rub my stump, which shows them that I’m establishing my own barriers, outside of which, nothing exists. It seems to be working so far!

Right – gotta grab them Z’s!

Best wishes

Roz. :)

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Guest bearlover

:) Sounds like your well on your way. I remeber the feeling of th blood rushing to the stump when I stood up too..I can still feel that but not as much..Hope you continue to do well. Keep us up dated! And best of luck! LBK 3 years now!

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Happy Anniversary, Bearlover!

You always sound so positive that each anniversary must represent continuous progress! I'm right at the start of this, so seeing how well things can work out is really helpful to me!

Very best wishes

Roz. :)

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Guest bearlover

:) Thanks RozM and when it has been 3 years for you will , be amazed at your accomplishments too! It dose go by fast!! :)

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Hi, Roz

It sounds like you are doing fabulously! Much better than I did!! :blink:

When I read your note about the crutches I thought "oh oh....I've been using them for 6 weeks, ack!" :o I will say that when I put on the test socket last week and tried to take a step, I tended to lean waaaay over to my good side (the right), and it did not feel right to me when they leveled out my hips and had me stand straight. Leaning to the right felt better! I'm down to one crutch now, and walking a little straighter (although I still baby my amputated side because the muscles are still a little sore). What I did to work on losing my lean was simply standing and transferring weight to my amputated side and holding it there. It just took a day or two to correct it. As I remember, I used crutches after my original surgery at age 13 also.

Personally, I'd have gone crazy if I hadn't been able to use crutches. No one told me not to use them....but then again, no one told me I could get a blood clot in my lung if I travelled too soon after surgery, so I'd trust your physio people over mine! :angry: Perhaps if you don't use crutches exclusively you won't have a problem.

Hang in there..... now comes the hard part..... hanging out and letting it all heal! I know how tough it can be to have patience. I'm looking forward to reading your updates!

XO

Karen

AKA

Orlando, Florida

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Hi Krazy1200;

Thanks very much for that! This is the kind of first-hand experience I was looking for regarding crutches...

I agree with you about going crazy without crutches! After only a few days of avoiding them, I snapped today and went up and down 4 flights of stairs, foot-over-crutches - it was great! But then, I've been practicing extreme mobility on crutches for 27 years! However, I guess I didn't get a bias to one side because I could still walk very short distances on my bad leg, and I can't do that any more, so I'd better behave!

Krazy - had you used a wheelchair at all during your 6 weeks since surgery, or was it all spent using only crutches?

All is well with my 9-day old stump today - there are only a few tiny phantom limb twinges, which I gently massage away, and the chisels-in-the-heel phantom pain is only suggested when I touch the bandages near the sensitive spot in my suture line - so I'm careful there! The dressing will be changed again on Tuesday, which I'm somewhat apprehensive about!

...healing is sooooooooo boring!!!

Best wishes to you all!

Roz. :)

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Guest bearlover

Roz..I handle :angry::blink: :o stairs by matter of butt! Slide down on butt and go up on my knees :o

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Hi Bearlover;

Yes - I was shown how to do stairs - up and down - on my butt, by the physiotherapists before they would let me out of hospital!

I haven't heard of using knees, though! I won't be able to try that for a while while my bones heal, but now you've mentioned it, as soon as I can, I will!

Best wishes

Roz. :)

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The only time I used a wheelchair was on the way out of the hospital, and then again at the airport. When I was released from the second hospital, I was actually issued a walker! LOL I found that much harder to "walk" with than crutches (more of a hop-step!), but the argument was that because I was so groggy from drugs still I was less likely to take a fall. That lasted all of about 2 days, and I went to the crutches.

I know what you mean.....recovery is boring!!!! Not to mention that it can be very depressing at times. I've been up and down throughout the past 6 weeks. But you seem to be handling it all very well, and I applaud you! But don't expect too much from yourself, OK? I have been trying to take it one day at a time and celebrate the "baby steps". :)

Karen

AKA

Orlando, FL

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