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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
MNaverickR6

My intro into this new world

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the 10th of august was a bad day for me when a prat on a motor bike t-boned me (also on motor bike - i race em or did race em i should say). He hit my ankle at high speed and left me with massive 'de-gloving' of the foot and leg and an enakle that lloked more like a butchers left overs.

After i was re-built and had various lumps cut from parts of my body and added to my ankle i know have a foot that looks like it has a beef staek strapped to it a foot that doesnt look like a foot and an ankle that looks like it belongs to a 80year with water retention problems!!!!

After all this is pain that made me want to top myself i now find out that its as good as usless any way!!! after three days intense and gut renching pain i found a new friend - his name was 'Morphine' and wonder job that did..... still had pain but it was never as bad. i alsmost break down when i think whjat it was like.

anyway...... looks like i have to make the decision to become a RBK as my consultant wont make it for me. He knows its fro the best, i know its for the best but i still cant get my head round it.

At the moment i am taking Tramadol & diclafenic for the pain and i still only manage about 5 - 10 on my feet befor the pain becomes unbearable and i have to revert to my crutches. I'll never run again, to be honest i'll never do much again.

Having the amp will give me a new lease of life - i know this yet i am s..tting my pants abot what it will be like once i have it done.

It has turned my life upside down and i havent even had it done yet!!

Im in chigwell Essex and will be using the Harold wood limb centre.

anyhow.... thats me..... hello to you all........

Tony

p.s looks like d-day will be late january 04 - until then im shoes less as i cant fit one on my new foot!!! chilly toes!

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Tony,

Welcome to the forum and I'm sorry you had to join our ranks or I should say you have to join our ranks.. I'm here to tell you that you will return to an active lifestyle if that is what you chose to do. I am very active and don't let the fact that I'm one legged stop me. It is very hard to make a decision like that but you will need to look at all the pro's and con's of not having the amp vs having the amp. You have to make the final decision as nobody can make it for you. Right them down on a piece of paper that way you can actually see it not just think it. Like I said you should be able to have an active lifestyle but it will take time so don't get discouraged. Make use of this site by asking questions no matter how small they seem you might find someone has been there done that. Life with a unuseable leg is just not much of a life as far as I'm concerned. I have a friend also from the UK that had a foot just like yours he is now a bk amp almost two years. He is very active and riding motor bikes again. His was a result of a motor bike accident as well. If you wish I can get you intouch with him .

Brenda

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Hi Tony,

I'm a RAK amp. I had mine done just over a year ago, I am 54 years old. Mine was due to illness 3 1/2 years previously. My leg and foot deteriorated, backwards and forwards having bits cut off. I had pain 24/7 and could only use co-dydramol. I had very bad re-actions to Tramadol. I was pleased to have it done, even looked forward to it, so the pain would go away. I was walking 6 weeks after coming out of hospital.

I do much more with my life than ever, and all pain free, compared to what I was having.

Brenda gives good sound advice. The choice will be yours, to do whatever you want to do. It's up to you, no one can make you do anything.

I've heard that Haroldwood is a very good Limb centre. With their support and the support of the members here you will come through it alright. We are here for you to share the journey you are going to take.

Excuse the pun but we can be with you every step of the way. Just post, about how you feel, questions or problems as Brenda has said.

Remember, you're not alone.

Finally, I was born and raised in Ilford.

I went back a few times this year and was amazed at how it has changed.

Best regards

Steve

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Your injuries sound not unlike the ones I suffered (27 Feb 2003)

I virtually snapped the foot off above the ankle, crushed the foot at the instep, massive de-gloving etc.

Right from the start the surgeons said they would try to save the foot, but if it was not viable then they would have to amputate. After about 4 hours of surgery it was decided that the foot was not salvagable - all the soft tissue in the foot, from the ankle area to the toes, was mush (for want of a better word), so they performed a symes amputation (where they attach the heel to the bottom of the leg - giving a load bearing leg)

However, this failed as the heel had 'died'. On 1 Mar the surgeon had a look, confirmed the failure of the symes and asked when I wanted to go for the below knee amputation - I couldn't see any point in waiting so on the 2 March I had the below knee amputation. An infection delayed things a bit but after 4/5 months I was back at work.

It has now been 8 and a half months and most people couldn't tell I am an amputee.

I don't walk with a limp, can ride bikes, run (not that I ever used to) drive cars (auto and manual) (I used to race too) and am continuing to build up the Lotus 7 replica that I started some years ago - although I will now use motorcycle power so that I can get away with a hand operated clutch for starts, no clutch needed once moving.

The whole point of this, is to help you make your choice.

I would suggest that amputation sounds like the best option for you - your foot and ankle will most probably never get to a stage that could be called 'better' - if the doctors had 'saved' my foot I probably still would not be walking and would have had pain for the rest of my life.

There is a story of an English soldier (Jim Bonney) on the ossur web site - http://www.ossur.com - who had smashed his ankle in a climbing accident. After a year or two it was decided to amputate as it was the best option - again his ankle would never get better. He is now climbing again and doing all that he did before.

Hope this helps you

David

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My consultant didn't take my leg off for ten months, trying all sorts of things, grafting everything graftable and invading other parts of my body in the salvage attempts. All I would say is, I wish I had the amputation sooner. There really is nothing to be affraid of. I'm an AK, if you are to become a BK, you will be able to do everything you wish, running is not a problem. It's an interesting journey on which you about to embark, there will be ups and downs, but I'm sure the ups will outway the downs. Once you've accepted you have no real choice, it's easy.

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I agree wholeheartedly with what everyone has said. Being an amputee does not mean you will not be able to do the things you could before the accident. Many of our members are testament to the fact that all these activities are still viable. Its quite strange how some of us become MORE active after the operation - maybe its because those people feel they have a second chance and want to live life to the fullest.

I've heard glowing reports about Harold Wood - so you're in good hands as far as rehab and limb fitting goes. I think they have a very good support group as well so you'll have loads of people to compare notes with. Of course there is also this forum - one of the best online communities I know of.

I'm sorry for all the trauma which has lead you to where you are now, but once the decision is made you can start making plans for the future and get on with your life.

Best of luck.

Mandy

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One thing that's hard to understand before it happens is that, unlike your present medical situation, once you have the amputation (in the absence of other pre-existing medical problems) you will constantly be getting better. Don't kid yourself, the amputation will be hard but afterwards you will be genuinely recovering, not waiting for the next surgery to possibly improve things. You will have lots of challenges, but ones that can be overcome. Try to remember to allow yourself the time to get things together--you may not be back racing three weeks after surgery, but a year is not unreasonable. There's lot's of advice out there, but don't forget to use your own resourcefulness, too. One thing I have found as well (don't know if you're married!) :rolleyes:Chicks dig peg legs!

Well, there go my politically-correct sensitive male credentials.

Good luck--keep fighting!

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hi tony have faith you will make it we all do. it is not a bed of roses and on the way it contains some bloody big thorns but we are all here for you love sarah be strong

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Hi Sarah

'I just wanted to know, do guys like peglegs?'

Personaly, I see the person, not the package. So, to me it is irrelevant whether the girl has one or two legs. It is the person the girl is, that counts.

Just my opinion.

Best regards

Steve

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tell you what....... reading all this stuff has made me feel so much better about it all. thanx for all the replies....... makes you feel that there is light at the end of the tunnell.

cheers :P

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i am so glad you said that doggie you are right it is what is inside that makes the person not what you look like .you have restored my faith in men.

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hi trwinship you have also restored my faith in the male species

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Hey Tony,

I don't know what else I can add that hasn't already been said, but hang in there it does get better. I was a new BKA in March 2003 , Daytona Bike Week, USA, took it's toll on me and my husband. I had a complete amputation (among many other injuries), right above the ankle, at time of impact. The foot was so damaged there was no option to reattach. My husband faired a little better, his foot was still attached but barely and they where able to restore blood flow to save it, but there are times now that I am in better shape than he is, his ankle doesn't work very good due to non use for soooo long.

From my experiences and by listenting to others, I think you have made the best choice. Maybe when you have the amputation you can move on with your life. Yes...Virigina there is life after an amputation!!!!!!!

Always here for you!

Kimberly :D

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Tony-

I was in an accident 9 years ago crushing my ankle and foot. I spent 9 years sitting because the pain became so severe even with a huge brace going from my knee to the arch of my foot.

Finally last spring I was set to get yet another fusion and the doctor couldn't estimate how long this one would last until I'd have to have another. And, of course, try to cut down on my walking! It seemed like I was barely moving the way it was.

I saw all these advertisements on amputees and how life went on after the operations. It seemed to me that I might be better off without the foot and ankle altogether. So, I asked 3 different doctors for their opinions and got 1 for and 2 against. I also talked to 2 people who had the amputation themselves. And I decided to a RBK.

The surgery was this last August, and aside from having another surgery three weeks later for infection, things are going great. I'm back at work, I'm a school counselor, and feeling good. I cannot believe how good life is being free from pain. I no longer come home from work and lay in bed and cry because it hurts like a nasty SOB. I have some phantom pain at night but nothing that isn't manageable.

I don't know a whole lot, but from what I've heard I do believe that when an amputee feels they are in control and making the choice for themselves, things go easier. To most people both of my choices sucked, but they were choices. It was totally my choice to have the amputation, which in my mind was a choice to actually have a life and not just sitting in a chair watching the world go by.

Yes this was the most difficult decision I have ever made but I am 100% satisfied with my decision. I hope everything goes well with you. It might get tiring to hear but a positive attitude makes all the difference in the world. Some days go slow but all of a sudden things click into place.

Take care and keep in touch.

Caroln

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I was given the option of amputation after two years of doctors mucking around wiht my leg trying to remove a tumor. I didn't realise it until then but I was sooooo depressed with all the surgery and the unknown of whether it had worked that time or not. After visiting this website and talking to lot's of people, I found that I would be able to get back to doing the things I loved doing before the problems. It sounds silly, but it felt lke a welcome escape to get back on a course of normality, and get back to being a teenager!!!

It is up to you whether you choose to have the amputation, but I think that it has given me a new lease of life, and I am certainly much happier now than I was before :P

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