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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
lisa

Does anyone here class themselves as Disabled?

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Hi

I just wondered if anyone on this forum classed themselves as disabled?

I know this all a personal choice, just wanted other peoples thoughts. I have been an amputee since 24/03/2006 and don't have my leg yet due to extensive skin grafts. It took me a long time to accept that I'm a wheelchair user and I have accepted that I am disabled. I just wondered if my feelings will change when I get my leg? I hope this post makes sense?

Lisa

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I don't think it's realistic not to think of myself as disabled, yes I will try anything and everything and most often succeed but then again I do also have my limitations which are much more than an able bodied person.

It's all about being honest with yourself, no matter how good you think you are the loss of a limb IS a disability and no matter how fit and strong you are there will always be things you can't do or can't do as well as an able bodied person.

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yes lisa...i am disabled, but i don´t see a problem in this "word". i live my life and get to some limits, but "abledbodied" persons have also their limitations.

just an example...there are also amputte skydivers...and also so many people who don´t do that...and they are not ampuees. :)

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At the risk of having things thrown at me........... :P

No I don't consider myself disabled and never have and never will.

No matter what hurdles life throws at me I'll find a way over or around.

Great question Lisa it's going to be interesting to see the responses :)

Cat

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Good question Lisa........................................

Here are a few definitions that I could find for Disabled;

disabled - impaired, as in physical functioning

disabled - incapacitated by injury or illness

disabled - to be so badly injured as to be unable to continue

disabled - physically impaired people considered as a group

And I guess that I would fit into the first category there as impaired.

For as much as I hate to admit it, I am impaired, as in physical functioning.

Perhaps it is not the word disabled itself that tastes so bad,

but being grouped together with others who are.

For we all know that there are others out there who take being disabled to a much higher level!

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I am with Cat.

I don't class myself as being disabled. There is nothing I cannot do (with leg on) that somebody with two full legs can do therefore how am I any different?

The only time I take my leg off is when I am in bed and you don't need two legs to sleep or to do anything else that happens there.......

I think it is a very individual thing though, and so I can appreciate how others on here might think of themselves as disabled.

Fiona

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Sometimes I feel 'a bit limited', but I don't feel disabled. Perhaps that's because I've grown up with a limited mobility? I don't know...? However, I do know that people who had an amputation when they were a child often feel the way Cat & I do.

I personally think that the word 'disabled' is a negative term that is over used and because it's overused, I think it's disempowering. I don't like the word handicapped either...in fact, coming from the UK, to me that term is even less acceptable.

At the end of the day, these are just labels to allow some administrator to stick you in a little box. The most important thing is to know and to like who you are, not what you are...

Lizzie :)

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People have thrown a label at us (don'cha love that) and as amputees our label to all the AB people out there and all the laws they make chuck us into the "disabled" category.

Disability in this instance isn't a mental state they're talking about. Losing a limb makes you disabled. The dreaded label.

Whether you choose to live as a disabled person is another thing altogether.

There are many leg (and arm) amputees who decide to live without prosthetics and they can be far more agile and mobile than those of us with arty bits. Ergo prosthetics/aids do not necessarily make us non-disabled. The fact that we don't have the function of all our limbs makes us so.

I'm classified as disabled. I don't give a hoot about the label, it doesn't hurt my ears. Physically I am what they say. As per the wordly definition.

How we live is another thing altogether. Head space is much stronger than brawn.

:)

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Hello Lisa and everyone

Wow what a topic!

I consider myself disabled at the moment, as i have not had by new leg yet due to falling down the stairs a week ago!

However when i get my new leg i would probably consider myself as able as anyone else.

Although without sitting on the fence to much it depends on the person and circumstances, i have worked hard all my life and never claimed benefits, but at the moment i am un-employed, seperated from my wife, and considered homeless, and if because of my amputation i can claim benefits by being classed as disabled then hey why not!

neil :huh:

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I believe I may have posted this before.

If you are told something for long enough you will begin to believe it to be true. The label sticks.

Number 6 said it all, "I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed, or numbered. My life is my own."

I do not believe I am disabled and never will be I just have different requirements, thats not being disabled - just bit different. Someone paralysed from the neck down I would have consider disabled - Christopher Reeve proved me wrong there.

At work I'm not given an inch (thats the way I want it), when it's my turn to fetch the coffees I do it, carrying 8 cups of coffee while sat in a wheelchair took some mastering.

I'm told you will not be able to do this or that again, the truth is I probably nether did it in the first place so, why would I try with no legs.

Sparky

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I watched the movie "Madea's Family Reunion" a couple days ago. I like to pick up quotes here and there to be used in OR out of context. There was a gem in this one...

"Doesn't matter what people call you. What matters is what you answer to."

Or something like that :huh:

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Hi

I just wondered if anyone on this forum classed themselves as disabled?

I know this all a personal choice, just wanted other peoples thoughts. I have been an amputee since 24/03/2006 and don't have my leg yet due to extensive skin grafts. It took me a long time to accept that I'm a wheelchair user and I have accepted that I am disabled. I just wondered if my feelings will change when I get my leg? I hope this post makes sense?

Lisa

I believe when you put a label like that on yourself, you also put on some limitations you might not want to accept. I don't like labels like disabled or handicapped and attempts like differently-abled leave me cold. I do call myself an amputee, but that's just an observable fact. It says I'm probably not going to run a four-minute mile, but that's about it.

BTW, on the skin grafts, I had extensive skin grafting too. I started trying to use a prosthesis before it was totally healed and wound up costing myself a couple more months sitting in a chair most of the time. All told, it was about nine months before the stump would be able to stand the stress of the prosthetic. And yes, my outlook brightened considerably when I got the leg. I bet yours will too.

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Before getting my first prosthesis, I was unable to use crutches because of problems with my "good" foot, so I was in a wheelchair for many months. I felt disabled. Now I don't. I do have some limitations - like I don't run. But I wasn't doing that before :P So although I may be labeled as disabled (hey, I'm a poet), I don't see myself as such.

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believe when you put a label like that on yourself, you also put on some limitations you might not want to accept. I don't like labels like disabled or handicapped and attempts like differently-abled leave me cold. I do call myself an amputee, but that's just an observable fact. It says I'm probably not going to run a four-minute mile, but that's about it.

BTW, on the skin grafts, I had extensive skin grafting too. I started trying to use a prosthesis before it was totally healed and wound up costing myself a couple more months sitting in a chair most of the time. All told, it was about nine months before the stump would be able to stand the stress of the prosthetic. And yes, my outlook brightened considerably when I got the leg. I bet yours will too.

Tom,

Although I have only been, an amputee for 7 months I have been classed as severely disabled by the medical profession for over forty years. In all this time, I have never taken or asked for help, handouts or charity. My challenge was to get through life without ever having to.

When I say different, I mean not the same as something or somebody else, which is true I have burn scars covering my whole body and both my legs missing below the knees. I’m also tied to a wheelchair because of old skin graft issues and will be for the foreseeable future.

I now find I have to start all over again, I have to look at everything I did before my operation in a new light and I’m happy to say I’ve overcome just about every obstacle, still have some work in progress – height issues.

Labels like:

Disabled – difficulty performing some or all the basic tasks of daily life –

Disabled - Incapable of performing or functioning

Handicapped – an offensive term these days

I strongly object to them.

Differently – abled - Yes, I have to be in order to achieve my goals. I do not think that is putting a limitation on me.

If differently-abled offends can I use the word unique instead? :)

Sparky

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If differently-abled offends can I use the word unique instead? :)

Sparky

If differently-abled lands well on your ear and means the right thing to you, Sparky, go for it. I'm not offended in the least. In reality, all us humans are differently-abled, with strengths and weaknesses, talents and lack of same.

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Hi

I just wondered if anyone on this forum classed themselves as disabled?

I consider myself disabled although to look at me you wouldn't think so. I am not offended by the term seeing as I've accepted how I am. I couldn't care less about being looked at in a certain way or being categorized. Life is too short for the crap! Live, laugh and love is my outlook.

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I have a disability. There are things I could do before the amputation that I no longer am able to do(run). Some things I still do but just not as well(walk). Then there are things that I do just as well as before(eat).

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. Then there are things that I do just as well as before(eat).

:lol: :lol:

I'm not offended by the term "disabled" I just don't classify myself as such :)

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All of you - collectively - have said it so well. Handicapped? Disabled? Differently-abled? I'm not really worried about the labels, and can use them more-or-less interchangably.

We adapt as necessary, and go on living. Yeah, I have some limitations, as a DBKA with low vision. I use some equipment to get around. And life goes on.

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A man needs a computer for work. Knowing nothing at all about computers he walks into his local electrical store and asks to buy one. The sales advisor (shop assistant for the older ones amongst us) looks aghast and takes him to one side. Sir, he says we value all of our products equally and our advisors have been trained to ignore all differences in our line of products. Every one of our products makes an equal contribution to the success of our company and we refuse to apply labels to any of them. The man is a bit confused but he remembers, from pictures he's seen that, a computer has at least one slot in it so he makes his purchase and goes back to work. Was his computer a good buy?

NO ...

... but it did make fantastic toast ;)

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Hi Everyone

I'm so glad I put this post on here as I wasn't sure whether I would upset anybody. How I look at myself at the moment is that inside I am still the same person as before I had the accident. Its strangers that look at me differently and to be honest their opinion doesn't mean anything to me. I am lucky that I had a bubbly personality before I had the accident and I'm trying my hardest to keep hold of it. I am not ashamed to call myself disabled and it has actually made me more open minded to how disabled people are treated. I am extremely lucky that I have the opportunity to walk again and I have so much respect for people who are wheelchair bound because I find it extremely difficult. I have had so many strangers approach me and open their hearts about children/family members who are disabled who have been treated like crap. I really believe that I need to do something worthwhile, now this has happened to me. What I will do I don't know. I always say that I never ran a marathon before the accident so I'm not likely to do it now.

Thank you so much for your comments.

Lisa

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Again, I seem to be the "strange duck" here. I was legally "disabled" before my accident and amputation.

It was a spinal disk rupture. Inoperable.

I didn't feel disabled then and I don't now. What I can't (or shouldn't) do any more, that I once could:

Bench press 500 lb.

Scuba dive to 180 ft.

Stay up all night drinking and go to work the next day.

Race sports cars (and mostly win).

I don't miss any of the above (mmm, racing, maybe) cause I've got so many other things that I can do that my life is pretty full. I've taken advantage of the "down time" to help others and to catch up on the world around me. I have plans and projects that will last me another 30 years. We (my wife, son, and I) are starting up two more businesses and modifying one of the existing ones.

"disabled", I think not!

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I felt that way in the beginning... However, after 5 years I am confident thar

I am simply "Physically Challenged" I was doing fine until a bad infection put me in a w/c for 2 1/2 yrs. Now I am out of rehab and first understand the "challenge" as it is much more fun....

Now I know how "Rocky" felt!

Pattilyn :blink:

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Hi

I agreed with nearly everything said here and have only one or two things to add.

In December 2005 when I got my new leg, I was over the moon and was so mobile I would never have dreamed I was disabled.

In February when I broke my said leg(dancing) I became less and less able. Now in September I FEEL disabled as no-one seems to be able to put it right. I find that its when I deal with the "professonals" that I feel more and more disabled. (I have come to the conclusion that I am a control freak)

If my lights go out I fix them. If the car battery is dead I sort it. I have even changed a tyre on the M25. However, inorder to become more mobile I am reliant on a string of people who either dont listen or do and think they know better!!!!!!!!!

Am I disabled, yes to the outside world.

Am I old, yes to the kids I work with.

But when I look in the mirror I still see myself as 18 and whole!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Rachel

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To me, the label "disabled" is really sort of a state of mind. You can be as disabled as you choose. Or not.

I got hurt very badly, and there's a huge amount of things that I can't do at all since then......however......There's a whole bunch of things that I can do that I would of never thought about doing.

I hadn't been home from the hospital for 2 days after a very long time there, when I started making my bed from my chair and even cooking as well as I could with only one good arm and a bum shoulder that still couldn't take much.. I know that my life will never be what it was, pre- accident, but, I thank the good Lord up above every day that I am not paralyzed. I could of been so easily..

I'm glad to hear that you are doing so well, and that you don't see your life as being over. It just presents different challenges..

With time, it does get easier with time...

So, you see, as they say, it really is a state of mind.

Higgy

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