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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
lisa

Does anyone here class themselves as Disabled?

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maybe another definition for "feeling disabled".

all people who use the advantages for disabled...i mean tax, cheaper cars, parking, free bus driving and so on....must feel sometimes feel disabled, otherwise they would not use the "advantages" :rolleyes: :lol:

@oneblueleg

thats what i meant...but my english is not so well. :)

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all people who use the advantages for disabled...i mean tax, cheaper cars, parking, free bus driving and so on....must feel sometimes feel disabled, otherwise they would not use the "advantages" :rolleyes: :lol:

I don't "feel" disabled although I accept the label because I am physically dinged. I take full advantage of the "perks" we have here in South Africa, which aren't many to say the least.

I don't always use the disabled parking, unless the lot is packed full and I would have to walk miles.

I deduct every single medical expense from my yearly tax returns. After all, I have more now that I am damaged. It's the only personal tax deduction afforded us.

South Africans can claim a rebate on import duties if they buy a new imported vehicle. This is great, particularly in view of the fact that an automatic car is at least 15K more expensive than a manual car, and it definitely isn't by choice that I now drive an auto. All things considered though, servicing an imported car is twice the price of servicing a local one, so it's really not a great saving in the grand scheme of things.

There's no free public transport here. And anyway, using public transport is taking your life into your hands.

I'm trying to think of other hand outs "disabled" people get, but I can't think of any. Too bad....

B)

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hello ally,

as i said, its a kind of searching for a"better" word in my eyes.

i have no problems with this word and i sometimes feel disabled, sometimes not. see the example with the stairs ;)

ciao thomas

btw.....here "normal" ak amps don´t get the allowance to park on places for handicapped/disabled....

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maybe another definition for "feeling disabled".

all people who use the advantages for disabled...i mean tax, cheaper cars, parking, free bus driving and so on....must feel sometimes feel disabled, otherwise they would not use the "advantages" :rolleyes: :lol:

@oneblueleg

thats what i meant...but my english is not so well. :)

Sadly I don't get all those advantages :(

Ally... I like 'physically dinged'

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OK, the way I see it is this - it's like being a road user.

We are all road users...travelling the road of life, so to speak.

Most of the members of this board used to drive a motor with a 2L engine and since they've become amps they've been unable to use their 2L engine all the time. Sometimes they can use their much prized engine (on their good days), but most of the time they have to use their trusty Citroen 2CV (I have nothing against 2CV's, btw). When they have really bad days they have to resort to using a bike.

Some of us have always had to use our 2CV's, as we've had to grow up with them and we've got used to swopping between our 2CV and our bike. We've become very skilled at manoeuvres and we are able to get the absolute best out of our motors, because we are highly skilled road users. Often more skilled than people realise, especially seeing as people only tend to see the car first and not the person.

We have differences, but we are all road users whether we like it or not. Those of us who have had to grow up with the differences see no reason why we should be treated any differently to other road users.

Escaping from that analogy now: Using a label is fine if you like that sort of thing. For various reasons, quite a few people don't, especially the ones who have grown up with it. Of course, I acknowledge that I'm an amputee (I'd be a fool not to) and that I am a person with (what some people class) a disability, but I am not disabled.

Lizzie :)

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Hello,

I think that Thohorn and Ally have hit the nail on the head.

I don't get or take up any of the "perks" that disabled people in the UK are allowed. The reason I don't do this is that I don't feel I need them. In no way is my life more expensive now than it was before I lost my leg and my earning power hasn't changed either, so I just don't see why I would be justified in accepting the perks when there are people that need them far more than I do.

As a result of that I don't feel disabled, I don't see myself as disabled, and others don't see me as disabled. I am not disabled.

And I know it is only a label, but I don't think that I fit it.

Fiona

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Well said Fiona... if only everyone had the same community spirited, honest and selfless attitude.

It's so refreshing hearing someone not trying to get everything they can screw out of the state whether they need it or not.... just because "it's their right".

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OK, the way I see it is this - it's like being a road user.

We are all road users...travelling the road of life, so to speak.

Most of the members of this board used to drive a motor with a 2L engine and since they've become amps they've been unable to use their 2L engine all the time. Sometimes they can use their much prized engine (on their good days), but most of the time they have to use their trusty Citroen 2CV (I have nothing against 2CV's, btw). When they have really bad days they have to resort to using a bike.

Some of us have always had to use our 2CV's, as we've had to grow up with them and we've got used to swopping between our 2CV and our bike. We've become very skilled at manoeuvres and we are able to get the absolute best out of our motors, because we are highly skilled road users. Often more skilled than people realise, especially seeing as people only tend to see the car first and not the person.

We have differences, but we are all road users whether we like it or not. Those of us who have had to grow up with the differences see no reason why we should be treated any differently to other road users.

Escaping from that analogy now: Using a label is fine if you like that sort of thing. For various reasons, quite a few people don't, especially the ones who have grown up with it. Of course, I acknowledge that I'm an amputee (I'd be a fool not to) and that I am a person with (what some people class) a disability, but I am not disabled.

Lizzie :)

Shane <-----wishes he could be the first to stand and start the ovation! :D :D

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Guest bearlover
Hi everyone,

I do not like being called disabled. I do more than a lot of able bodied people. I rather be called challenged.

Right on! I also see many healthy people with all of their limbs who would even do what we all do! I would rather be called challanged if a name must be labled on it. ;)

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A Rose by any other name is still a Rose...

So is horse pucky

It doesn't matter what people call me, or how they see me....... Like my favorite character Popeye likes to say: "I YAM WHAT I YAM".

Any disability that I am experiencing comes from my age (close to 70) and my circulation,(that doctors went in to "FIX" (Ha!!), 18 years ago).

If anyone thinks they are "disabled" now, just wait until your age catches up with you.

Disabled to me is definitely a relative term.

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A Rose by any other name is still a Rose...

So is horse pucky

It doesn't matter what people call me, or how they see me....... Like my favorite character Popeye likes to say: "I YAM WHAT I YAM".

Any disability that I am experiencing comes from my age (close to 70) and my circulation,(that doctors went in to "FIX" (Ha!!), 18 years ago).

If anyone thinks they are "disabled" now, just wait until your age catches up with you.

Disabled to me is definitely a relative term.

:( :blink::huh: You certainly nailed that one Jim !!!!!

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Yep I'm disabled-physically it's just a label-and well some people could say mentally too! :P

I'm also cheeky - does that count?

Mel.

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Hi

I just wondered if anyone on this forum classed themselves as disabled?

I know this all a personal choice, just wanted other peoples thoughts. I have been an amputee since 24/03/2006 and don't have my leg yet due to extensive skin grafts. It took me a long time to accept that I'm a wheelchair user and I have accepted that I am disabled. I just wondered if my feelings will change when I get my leg? I hope this post makes sense?

Lisa

Hi Lisa

Labels why o why do we have to put labels on ourselves. :angry:

I have lost my left leg above the knee .yes it p**Ed me off

BUT im still Mick :D

Not...........disabled Mick

Not...........poor old Mick

Not...........not quite able Mick

Not...........defected Mick

Not...........physically impaired Mick

Not...........a bit limited Mick

Just plane old Mick :D

I think that once you start thinking that you are disabled (or what ever label you want to call it) you lose something; you might as well just give up and spend the rest of your life wondering what you could have been or what you could have done. :(

We only get one shot at this life live it to the max. :P

Myself I do not or never will think of myself as anything other than Mick and there is nothing that I can’t do that I WANT to do. (Not true I still haven’t tried to hang-glide again yet but it’s my wife that stops me from trying that sport again and I might be a bit stupid but im not stupid enough to cross her)

Now when I want to try something or do something I don’t even think should I or can I do this I just do it. The fact that my leg’s gone doesn’t even come into the thinking,

At home, work or at play im treated the same as I always was I ask for NO favours or help and don’t want anything different.

I read on here somewhere when I first joined that you should challenge yourself I really do think that is good advice. Also I see/read what other “amps” (labels again) do and think that if they can do that so can I. I know that it been stated on this forum that you shouldn’t but I do. And so should you.

I read from your post that you think that you are disabled well I think that you are so wrong,

WHY:……………because .your a fit healthy young lady. You will get your leg & learn how to use it and then back to normal life.

But ONLY if you want to, if you look upon yourself as anything other you never will.

Please don’t take this as a personal dig at you but get your mindset right. And start thinking from now on I am not disabled.

Hopefully in six months time you will be out drinking /clubbing & generally having fun with the biggest problem you face will be something like can I wear 4” heels with this foot or is my outfit ok ??. ;)

If this post has upset anyone I am sorry it was not intended to .IF I have upset you Lisa get angry get mad get your mindset right get your leg on learn to use it.

BUT REMEMBER IF YOU THINK THAT YOU ARE DISABLED YOU WILL BE…………………..TAKE CARE Mick (putting crash helmet on getting ready duck the flack)

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The only time I feel disabled is when a muscle pain slows me down, other than that it's been so long since I had two legs, I don't remember what it was like. IMO, my anxiety is where I feel disabled, guess the VA agrees, that is the biggest part of my service connected disability now. :angry:

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Disabled to me is definitely a relative term.

If you don't like being called disabled why is it OK to called your Uncle or Aunt (or any other relative) disabled? Just because they are family should make any difference!

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Disabled to me is definitely a relative term.

If you don't like being called disabled why is it OK to called your Uncle or Aunt (or any other relative) disabled? Just because they are family should make any difference!

:lol: :lol: :P :lol: :P

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Disabled to me is definitely a relative term.

If you don't like being called disabled why is it OK to called your Uncle or Aunt (or any other relative) disabled? Just because they are family should make any difference!

Oneblueleg, do you know that you are so dry and so sharp? :angry:

That was so funny - thanks, I needed that! :D :lol: :D

Lizzie :)

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Ok. I'll put in my say. I have a disability, no legs and can't walk, but I'm not disabled. I can still get around, I drive, I do work around the house, of course except on the roof!! I always liked spelling it [dis]ABLED to help people see what was important in the word. I miss my legs terribly, after all being a letter carrier(mailman), for 17 years I did a fair share of walking and enjoyed it. But this is the path in life I have been given and I accept it. And for those who don't know I had been trying prosthetics for 2 years and decided the stress was keeping me from being happy. I feel much better, but still miss walking. Thanks.

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Disabled to me is definitely a relative term.

If you don't like being called disabled why is it OK to called your Uncle or Aunt (or any other relative) disabled? Just because they are family should make any difference!

I know you meant that tongue-in-cheek, but I did have an aunt and an uncle on the maternal side of my biological family that also were amputees - from circulation just like me - that to me were disabled.

They tell me that he lost his leg in his 40's (RBK) and spent the rest of his life sitting in his wheel chair waiting from some one to push him, and didn't even try to help himself. She, (my aunt), lost hers (also RBK),in her 80's, (Just after I met her in 1983, and five years before I lost mine, RBK), and never was able to get around by herself after that.

So - maybe your comment about disabled relatives, was.........relative

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Disabled to me is definitely a relative term.

If you don't like being called disabled why is it OK to called your Uncle or Aunt (or any other relative) disabled? Just because they are family should make any difference!

I know you meant that tongue-in-cheek, but I did have an aunt and an uncle on the maternal side of my biological family that also were amputees - from circulation just like me - that to me were disabled.

They tell me that he lost his leg in his 40's (RBK) and spent the rest of his life sitting in his wheel chair waiting from some one to push him, and didn't even try to help himself. She, (my aunt), lost hers (also RBK),in her 80's, (Just after I met her in 1983, and five years before I lost mine, RBK), and never was able to get around by herself after that.

So - maybe your comment about disabled relatives, was.........relative

OK... for Aunt and Uncle read Sister and Niece... :unsure: ... spooky that I chose Aunt and Uncle...

(& thanks Lizzie)

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I agree with Bear Physically chalanged is the word for me as I learn new ways of doing things every day. Its the ablebodied that have labled us disabled, so much for being accepted in the abled bodied world. We have to have a tag hung on us. Waht about the abled bodied people? lol .

Hides PD parking sticker under the seat hehehe. :lol:

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