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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
oneblueleg

DLA (question for Brits)

DLA  

44 members have voted

  1. 1. Are you in receipt of DLA? (any rate)

    • Yes and I'm a BK
      13
    • Yes and I'm an AK
      13
    • Yes and I'm a bi-lateral (AK and/or BK)
      5
    • No and I'm a BK
      7
    • No and I'm an AK
      5
    • No and I'm a bi-lateral (AK and/or BK)
      1


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I know this isn't scientific, and alot of us have other health issues that affect whether or not we receive DLA, aside from our amputation level/severity, but I'm interested in the numbers if I take the straw poll.

Whether or not you've applied, it doesn't matter.

Apologies to arm amps, hip amps and any other level, but I'm interested specifically in the levels I've given (nothing personal ;) ).

Please add any provisos to your responses.

I think it will be useful to gauge, for some, whether it's worth applying if it can be seen who does and doesn't receive it already.

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I'm not sure if you're aware, oneblueleg, but the Limbless Association's magazine 'Step Forward' has recently been discussing this benefit. The latest edition (which you should be able to read at most limb centres if, like me, you're not a subscriber), includes a readers' letter which states that the decision to award someone the benefit '...is not dependant solely on medical criteria, but how the particular problem or problems, affect the person's daily life; which explains to some extent, why it is not automatically awarded to amputees.'

Btw, I assume that DLA (Disability Living Allowance) in your poll, just means the DLA mobility component? ;)

Lizzie :)

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Btw, I assume that DLA (Disability Living Allowance) in your poll, just means the DLA mobility component? ;)

Lizzie :)

Thanks Lizzie... I mean any DLA... but yes, I guess that's the one that matters...

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I'm not sure if you're aware, oneblueleg, but the Limbless Association's magazine 'Step Forward' has recently been discussing this benefit. The latest edition (which you should be able to read at most limb centres if, like me, you're not a subscriber), includes a readers' letter which states that the decision to award someone the benefit '...is not dependant solely on medical criteria, but how the particular problem or problems, affect the person's daily life; which explains to some extent, why it is not automatically awarded to amputees.'

Btw, I assume that DLA (Disability Living Allowance) in your poll, just means the DLA mobility component? ;)

Lizzie :)

I met an AKA the other day at my rehab centre, he told me that the DWP had re-assessed him and told him he nolonger qualified for DLA. Unfortunately I could not question him further as I had been called away by my physio.

Sparky

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Okey dokey! I've found a DWP (Depart of Work and Pensions) webpage, that may (or may not ;)) throw a bit of light on the subject - here.

With specific reference to amputees, it says that you are entitled to the Higher Rate if you 'have no legs or feet, either from birth or through amputation, at or above the ankle.'

The grey area seems to be when you still have a leg or a foot...whatever that means...? :angry:

Btw, I don't know why? But, wording in the 'Artificial Aids' section made me smile. Perhaps, it was because they don't sound very sure either...? :P

Lizzie :)

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Lizzie, thanks for the link made interesting reading I found the Prescribed degrees of disablement interesting and wonder how they came to these figures.

Sparky

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DLA (from the DWA website...

The mobility component

This is available to people who meet one or more of the mobility conditions listed below. There are 2 rates: [Legislation (29)]

Lower:

For people aged 5 or over

and who are able to walk but need someone with them to provide guidance or supervision for most of the time when they are outdoors.

Higher:

For people aged 3 or over

and who are unable or virtually unable to walk due to a physical disability

or have no legs or feet, either from birth or through amputation, at or above the ankle

or are both 100% blind and 80% deaf and need someone with them outdoors

or are severely mentally impaired, with severe behavioural problems and qualify for the highest rate of the care component

or by making the effort required to walk would endanger their life or cause deterioration in their health.

The definition of needs guidance or supervision outdoors, together with definitions for other mobility conditions, conditions, can be found in ‘Terminology’.

Artificial aids

If you can use an artificial aid such as a walking stick or an artificial limb, then your ability to walk using that aid is assessed. This does not apply if you have no legs or feet. [Legislation (30)]

Interesting.... need someone with them to provide guidance or supervision for most of the time when they are outdoors I'll never qualify for it thankfully!!! Here's hoping anyway...

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Interesting.... need someone with them to provide guidance or supervision for most of the time when they are outdoors I'll never qualify for it thankfully!!! Here's hoping anyway...

I've alway needed it coming home in the early hours of a Sunday morning :D

Sparky

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Interesting.... need someone with them to provide guidance or supervision for most of the time when they are outdoors I'll never qualify for it thankfully!!! Here's hoping anyway...

I've alway needed it coming home in the early hours of a Sunday morning :D

Sparky

Good point.... didn't think about that... only Sunday early hours of the morning eh? lightweight!

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The whole benefits system is so complicated!! i had to have a benefits advisor to act on my behalf. I believe that if someone is disabled by what ever means!! they should be entitled to the same amount as other people.

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I think it's worrying that half the people who have responded so far are AK or BK and are "unable or virtually unable to walk". That says something for the quailty of the prosthetists they have doesn't it?

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I've Just had my DLA renewal letter,

I'm now no longer eligable for the mobility, when I stated that I use it to fund a car (without which I'd be house bound since I can't walk to the nearest bus stop without doing myself harm) I was told that as long as I can walk 100m Then I'm obvoiusly not disabled enough to need help with transport.

What is strange is that they say I need help around the house because I'm unable to do basic tasks like cook myself a meal, house work etc. How is it that (in thier eyes) I'm unable to do simple things around the house but I'm perfectly able to make the half mile walk to the nearest bus stop, do my weekly shopping and then carry in home on my own.

At one point it was implied that if I didn't go to work then I wouldn't have such a problem because I could use the time I wear my leg at work to go about my daily chores. They didn't offer any soultion to the problem of paying my rent / bills.

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I've Just had my DLA renewal letter,

I'm now no longer eligable for the mobility, when I stated that I use it to fund a car (without which I'd be house bound since I can't walk to the nearest bus stop without doing myself harm) I was told that as long as I can walk 100m Then I'm obvoiusly not disabled enough to need help with transport.

What is strange is that they say I need help around the house because I'm unable to do basic tasks like cook myself a meal, house work etc. How is it that (in thier eyes) I'm unable to do simple things around the house but I'm perfectly able to make the half mile walk to the nearest bus stop, do my weekly shopping and then carry in home on my own.

At one point it was implied that if I didn't go to work then I wouldn't have such a problem because I could use the time I wear my leg at work to go about my daily chores. They didn't offer any soultion to the problem of paying my rent / bills.

Sounds to me like you should be getting something, you just need help filling in the forms...

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Grum,

If you can't walk the 100m then you should appeal against the decision, it would be better for you if you got your local Citizens Advice Bureau to help you with this process. You have no choice but to appeal as it won't be long until they withdraw the care component as they will want to know how you can carry the shopping!

Oneblueleg,

I think it's worrying that half the people who have responded so far are AK or BK and are "unable or virtually unable to walk". That says something for the quailty of the prosthetists they have doesn't it?

Either that or perhaps some of us are not as fit as others and have other physical disabilities other than our amputations.

Lynne

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Grum,

If you can't walk the 100m then you should appeal against the decision, it would be better for you if you got your local Citizens Advice Bureau to help you with this process. You have no choice but to appeal as it won't be long until they withdraw the care component as they will want to know how you can carry the shopping!

Oneblueleg,

I think it's worrying that half the people who have responded so far are AK or BK and are "unable or virtually unable to walk". That says something for the quailty of the prosthetists they have doesn't it?

Either that or perhaps some of us are not as fit as others and have other physical disabilities other than our amputations.

Lynne

I said it's not scientific ;)

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I've Just had my DLA renewal letter,

I'm now no longer eligable for the mobility, when I stated that I use it to fund a car (without which I'd be house bound since I can't walk to the nearest bus stop without doing myself harm) I was told that as long as I can walk 100m Then I'm obvoiusly not disabled enough to need help with transport.

What is strange is that they say I need help around the house because I'm unable to do basic tasks like cook myself a meal, house work etc. How is it that (in thier eyes) I'm unable to do simple things around the house but I'm perfectly able to make the half mile walk to the nearest bus stop, do my weekly shopping and then carry in home on my own.

At one point it was implied that if I didn't go to work then I wouldn't have such a problem because I could use the time I wear my leg at work to go about my daily chores. They didn't offer any soultion to the problem of paying my rent / bills.

When you filled in your forms (i.e. book :unsure:), did you tell them what you could do on your good days? Or did you tell them what you could do on your bad days?

Lizzie :)

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I've Just had my DLA renewal letter,

I'm now no longer eligable for the mobility, when I stated that I use it to fund a car (without which I'd be house bound since I can't walk to the nearest bus stop without doing myself harm) I was told that as long as I can walk 100m Then I'm obvoiusly not disabled enough to need help with transport.

Hi Grum

I don't understand why they stopped the mobility allowance because you said you used it to fund a car, it is none of their business how you spend the benefit.

I was told that when they ask you how far you can walk, etc. etc. what you can do in the home etc. you tell them how it is on a bad day, not on a good day. If there are days you are unable to wear your leg, or it is painful to wear then that would consititute a bad day, ie. days you can't wear the leg or rely on crutches, explain to them that if you do a more than a certain amount of walking etc. then you are unable to wear the limb the next day, then you are unable to walk anyway.

It is very easy for us to come over as if everything is normal for us, because we adapt and it does become normal. Did someone come and see you to assess you, or did you go to them, if you are in the postition of having to visit them, question the journey, the parking, stairs etc., and point out to them your difficulties on a bad day.

I think if I was you I would be appealing.

Ann

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Hullo again,

Lizzie, I guess I've fallen for that trap, maybe I wasn't being hard enough on myself. I just hate listing all the things I can't do etc.

Ann, maybe I didn't write that too well, They're not saying they're stopping my DLA because I'm using it for a car. I said I needed it to fund a car (without which I'd be stuck indoors etc...)

I have asked for a re-decision and explained everything to them but this takes 3 months and then if they still decide the same way then I can appeal (which can take up to a year!). If the appeal is succesful then all payments will be back-dated, what they didn't say is how I'm supposed to make the payments in the mean-time.

I'll let you know how I get on,

TTFN

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OK... I'm baffled... the lower the amputation, the more likely it is you'll receive DLA... :blink:

The Poll wasn't that useful then... :ph34r: ;)

I said it wasn't scientific!

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OK... I'm baffled... the lower the amputation, the more likely it is you'll receive DLA... :blink:

The Poll wasn't that useful then... :ph34r: ;)

I said it wasn't scientific!

Well, correct me if I'm wrong, but...

...there were 10 BK's who answered the question &, out of them, 7 received DLA. That's 70%.

...there were 7 AK's who answered the question &, out of them, 5 said they received DLA. That's 71.43%.

...there were 5 bilaterals who answered &, out of them, 4 said they received DLA. That's 80%.

So, although it's not scientific & I doubt whether there's a significant difference between the BK & AK figures, there does seem to be a difference that indicates that the higher the amputation level, the greater the chance of receiving DLA. You can't go by the numbers of BK's, AK's & bilaterals because as the figures suggest there are more BK's than AK's and more AK's than bilaterals (which is the same as in the general amp population).

Phew that was exhausting... :blink:

Lizzie :)

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Good News!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I asked the DWP to look at my case again and they eventually came back with the same decision (not eligable) so I requested an apeal.

Got my apeal result this morning and they are going to continue my mobility payments.

Just goes to show its never worth accepting thier first answer.

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Good News!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I asked the DWP to look at my case again and they eventually came back with the same decision (not eligable) so I requested an apeal.

Got my apeal result this morning and they are going to continue my mobility payments.

Just goes to show its never worth accepting thier first answer.

Well done Grum... \o/ ... you've hit the nail on the head... don't make it easy for them...

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