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clint

I want to run!

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Hi

My name is Clint (age 28). I am glad to find this forum. A little about myself, I was in a coal mine accedent on Sept 10 ,03 , I had my left leg amputated below my knee (around the calf of my leg) Sept 22 03. I have my second leg( I where a Alfa suction sock, a CPI Venture dynamic foot) and I am in a gate trainning class. I feel like I am doing great under the situation and everyone else says the same . When I ask about running I don't get much of a answer besides people saying that I should be happy to walk as good as I do. The people I have seen to treat me are not giving me a smart elic answer . I think they don't want to give me false hope. How do you ( any amputee that can run or jog) start the process of running? I thought I would ask befor just doing it or do I just need to do it?

Thanks for any repplies

Clint

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I am a RBK (Mar2003) and also wanted to be able to run - not that I was into running much before my accident.

Most of the time i can walk without a noticable limp (gets worse as I get tired) but I did find it very difficult to run or jog.

The physio I had during rehab wasn't too sure about how to go about running (or learning to run) but did ask other physios who suggested the following technique.

While standing still swing your arms as you would when running, then - without thinking too much about your gait/legs/whatever - just start running.

I know this sounds very simple, but it worked for me. It seems I was thinking too much about every step, what I should do and when. Once I got the rhythm right (the arm swinging) and not hinking about the steps, it all just fell into place.

Hope this helps.

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Clint,

Check out this article. Really the biggest thing is to make sure you are physically able to. I started running on a treadmill first at a slow rate I walked first then added short stints of running for a minute then walk then run as I got better I increased my amount of run time and decreased my amount of walk time. The reason I suggest on a treadmill is you have the rails you can hold on to when you first start and also if you feel you are in trouble you can stop the machine. When I started running on the road I would start out walking then add short stints of running like from one mailbox to another then I would increase it to two and so on. As my running ability improved so did my endurance now I am able to run up to 3 miles without a walk break and my longest running distance has been 13.1 which is a half marathon. First get your walking down and make sure you're leg is healed. Also talke to your CP and ask him if that is a good foot for running. I am not sure as I have a special running leg with a c-sprint foot by Ossur. http://www.ossur.com You can do it just have patients and start out slow. If I can help in any other way let me know. Really running is not out of the question for amputees you just have to have the desire and also a little help from others. I suggest you try to go see Dennis and Todd they hold the fitness for everyone seminars and teach amputees how to run at the clinics. http://www.fitnessforeveryone.com or http://www.opfund.com.

Good luck

http://www.oandp.com/edge/issues/articles/.../2003-12_05.asp

Brenda

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Hi

THank you for your repplies! After reading your repplies and reading the sites that you all linked to me I think that it would be best to try to build up more strength befor I start. I feel that I am almost there though. Using a tread mill would be a safe way to start. Will I actually get a callus on part of me leg or will the skin just get tough? I don't want to try to do somthing prematurely and set myself back by injuring my leg. Thanks again!

Clint :P

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Clint,

After you have been walking your skin will toughen up and that will help with the running. As I said it will take time and you making the choice to put off the running until you build up some strength is a good idea. Do some stretches and build up your core, hamstrings, quads and glute muscles will help you a lot when you do start running. If there is anything else I can help you with feel free to ask. I'm glad the links helped you and keep us posted on how you are doing. This is our Forum to help each other.

Brenda :D

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Thank you for the great advice about running. I am a soon-to-be amputee, have a deformed foot that will be amputated (FINALLY) on january 12. I am excited about *just* walking normallly for the first time in my life, have hardly allowed myself to think about running. But sometimes, when I see people running, I TRY...try to imagine what that feels like. I am reading up on it now, will see how rehab goes, and MAYBE this time next year I will know the feeling of running for the first time in my life!

I had decided that I would do the treadmill technique.....just practice my gait training a lot on the treadmill and then slowly, one day, increase the speed, until I was jogging...what a day that will be! Thanks for the encouragement!

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Jberna

Running is not that difficult as long as you have a foot that you can run with. I used my Flex VSP by ossur to run with at first now I use the C-Sprint by ossur. You wouldn't want to run with a foot like the college part as it's not designed for that use really only made for walking and is pretty good for inclines and uneven terraine. When you finally get your leg amputated and start the process of getting fitted for a prosthesis tell your Prosthetist that you have a desire to be able to run/jog and that way he will know what your activity level will be and can fit you with the right components.

Remember baby steps start out by strengthing your leg, glutes, quads, hamstrings on the amp side and the sound leg as well and good core strength is a plus as well. You will find all this together will make it easy for you to run when you are up to it but don't push yourself too fast. If you have the amp in Jan and you have no major health issues I would say by May or June you should be able to run/jog...

I highly recomend pilates.

Brenda

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I did the Limbless Association's 5k Active Amps fun run earlier this year in Richmond Park, London.

In my 3 years of rehab, following my LBK amputation, i had only run 20 metres down the corridor outside my office a few times. Hardly good preperation i know, but i was determined to finish. Which i did!

In truth, instead of a 5k run, it was more like a 2.5k run/2.5k walk, but the satisfation in finishing was immense!

I used my College Park footed leg for the run, which was actually fine. Although its not an out an out sports foot, it is a relatively high activity one which stores energy in it from the heel strike. This undoubtedly help me complete the course in 42 minutes. Not earth shattering to the outside world, but i felt on top of the world.

The Limbless Association are having another one next year. check out http://www.limbless-association.org for information.

Would i do a marathon? NO WAY! Thats why man invented engines! :D

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Scott,

That's great time actually for running and walking. I don't recommend the college park foot only because I wore one for 4 years and I was breaking the bushings all the time and with the constant running on the bushings they are more apt to wear out quicker.

Brenda

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Hi, I learned how to run when I was 10, a year and 1/2 after my amputation. I had a revision surgery 2 years ago, and haven't been able to do it since. My leg just hasn't been strong enough to handle the impact yet.

But when I was 10 I worked with a theropist for a month and was never able to master the concept, then I attended a workshop hosted by Todd Souffer and Dennis Alsup (paralimpic runners) and was running within a few hours.

I think the hardest part is getting yourself to speed up and grasp the jump concept. In order to run you have to be stable on your prostetic. start on one leg, and hope onto the other, then you just alternate. It's much easier if you watch another amputee do it, that's how I learned.

Good Luck

Nicole

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