Jump to content
Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
jberna

putting on your pants

Recommended Posts

Right now I am living with an AFO brace, until my amputation surgery. I had a thought this morning, wondering about how life will be different when I have a prosthesis, not an AFO brace. I dread changing long pants (esp slim cut leg jeans) because to do so I have to take off both my shoes, then un-velcro all the parts of my leg brace, take it off, change clothes, then go thru the hassle of hooking back all that velcro, putting shoes back on. When you have a BK artificial leg, do you put it on before

or after you put on long pants? The foot doesnt really "point its toe", to ease into shoes or pants, right? I know either way, clicking a leg on will take much less time than all these velcro straps, and trying to get my deformed foot to lay flat in the brace. I would guess there are times during the day where you have to click your leg off to put on more/less socks....does that take long?

Also, I saw some mid calf, low heel boots in an ad the other day and wondered if you would be able to get an artificial foot in a narrow boot like that? Since you can't point the toe? Just wondering...

judy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Judy,

Well as for the pants you shouldn't have to much trouble. I try to wear pants with a wider pant leg but not so wide they look stupid. I put my leg on first before I get dressed and never have a problem with getting the pants on unless the pant legs are to narrow. Usually you can wear boot cut jeans and do fine.

As for boots I wear lace up ones just be careful of the heal height. I have heard many amps say they have zippers put in the boots so that might be something to look into.

As for adding socks only takes a minute. I don't have to do that anymore but go in the restroom unzip pants pull them down take leg off add sock then put leg back on pull pants back on and you're done.

Brenda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It kind of depends on how big your feet are! As a man with size 11-12 feet (depends on the shoes!) I find it faster to put the pants on first, then the leg. It isn't impossible to put my pants on over my leg, just slower. I don't know about others, but I find it more convenient to put my shoe on my foot with the leg off. Having the shoe on does make it harder to slide your pants leg over your foot, though. As I'm not a runner, like Brenda, I don't change shoes very often so for me it's most convenient just to leave the shoe on most of the time. I don't mean to sound sexist, but it may be that women would need (or want) to change shoes more often.

Tall boots are a problem for my big feet--er, foot. I've wanted to take up fly fishing but haven't yet figured out a way to put on waterproof boots or waders that can't have zippers or laces all the way down the leg to the ankle--otherwise they'd leak. Has anybody else solved this problem, short of getting an expensive "water leg"?

I was about to add a few words of sage advice about stump socks, but then realized the logistics are a bit different for men and women. Follow Brenda's suggestions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the most exciting things, besides new mobility, that I look forward to with a new leg is the SHOES I get to pick from finally! Having a deformed foot, and then an AFO brace most of my adult life, I have always had to wear big, clunky, tie on tennis shoes. I dream of wearing ANYTHING else...the heels thing doesnt appeal to me anyway, so I dont have a problem with 'just' wearing low heel shoes. Just being able to WEAR normal shoes is exciting for me! I know most women are "shoe crazy" but I have never had the chance to be. I tease my husband that this artificial leg is going to cost NOTHING compared to my new SHOE budget!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Judy,

Sometimes it's hard to find shoes with a heal height that is good. I find that tennis shoes work best and are a lot more comfortable then heals. I have found a few good flat sandles that I like and when I find them I buy several pair because you know that once they are gone you usually don't see them again. I have been known to wear my tennis shoes with a dress before and I don't really care what people think. I went to a christmas party last year with a really nice knee length dress on with my new balance tennis shoes on and it was probably a funny site but you know what I was pretty comfortable and that's all that matters and you know my husband was so wonderful he wore dress pants and his guess what new balance tennis shoes so I didn't feel weird or out of place. He's such a great guy.

Brenda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had a thought this morning, wondering about how life will be different when I have a prosthesis, not an AFO brace.  I dread changing long pants  (esp slim cut leg jeans) because to do so I have to take off both my shoes, then un-velcro all the parts of my leg brace, take it off, change clothes, then go thru the hassle of hooking back all that velcro, putting shoes back on.

When you have a BK artificial leg, do you put it on before

or after you put on long pants?  The foot doesnt really "point its toe", to ease into shoes or pants, right? I know either way, clicking a leg on will take much less time than all these velcro straps, and trying to get my deformed foot to lay flat in the brace. I would guess there are times during the day where you have to click your leg off to put on more/less socks....does that take long?

Also, I saw some mid calf, low heel boots in an ad  the other day and wondered if you would be able to get an artificial foot in a narrow boot like that?  Since you can't point the toe? Just wondering...

I know what applies to a BK wearer won't necessarily apply to an AK wearer and viceversa, but I'll share my AK experience anyway.

When I go shopping for pants I usually get two pairs of the same model. If they have a tight cuff, they both go straight to a seamstress that tailors the leg of one pair to fit me. I often prefer to leave my leg at home and I don't much like rolling the pants leg up... not to mention I've had one bad experience too many with 'safety' pins. :P On the other pair, the one meant to be worn with my leg on, she fits a velcro strap to the seam from a bit below the knee on down so I can dress my leg more easily or, in some cases, so I can dress my leg, period.

As for the sequence I follow... I usually dress the leg first (sometimes the previous night), then I don the leg.

From time to time I get an itching to wear the only cowboy boots I've found with the right heel height and I regularly wear little quarter-height boots. The quarters usually come with a zipper, so those are easy enough. The cowboy boots can be a much bigger challenge if you didn't buy them with zippers, or at least fit some on later.

There ARE little tricks and you should use every single one of them to simplify your life as much as possible. B) Any which way, you should have an easier time dealing with a prosthetic leg than with a brace in that sense. The brace sounds clunkier.

Take care.

Laura

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have made a mess of a few pairs of trousers in shops by trying to get them to fit over my prosthesis. :)

They go back on the hanger all creased where I have tried to roll them up to get them on.

I also found that a few shops get annoyed when you ask for a chair in the changing rooms. I don't know how folk with two legs can try on trousers without a chair..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A word about changing shoes: a number of respondents have mentioned heel height. Since you haven't worn a prosthesis before I thought I'd make sure you understand that this isn't just a question of appearence, but also comfort and endurance time while wearing the leg. I can't vouch for others, but even relatively small changes in heel height make a big difference in how comfortable my leg is--slight changes in the angle of my foot cause discomfort in my knee and stump for a couple of days until I get used to the new "settings". This is not a big deal, but it means I can't just put on a new pair of shoes and walk all day (or dance the night away!)--they have to be broken in a bit. This is not just for shoes that are greatly different in style--boots vs sandals, say, but for any shoe change. Some types of feet allow for changes in the heel height, but new shoes still take some getting used to. You can have whatever shoes you like (within reason) but bear in mind that you'll need some break-in time.

Oh yes---just occurred to me: watch out for shoes that only cover the lowest part of your heel--would include many women's shoes, I expect. When I wear low-topped shoes, there's a tendency for my shoe to pull off from the heel when I go down stairs, due to a lack of flexure in the foot. This doesn't always happen, just something to be aware of and use caution, as a shoe coming off can trip you up, especially dangerous on stairways.

Understand, these are just caveats, not prohibitions. Awareness of problems helps you avoid them, making your new mobility that much more enjoyable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

I find it is easier to wear the pants first and then the leg, for a BK amp.

I use stretch material pants so it is easy to get the hose over the knee. My wife has managed to find a couple of pairs of pants that I wear to work during weekdays. I wear shorts over the weekends; that is easiest.

Kind regards,

Jukka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always just slipped the pants over my foot with the leg on. Having a sock or knee high stocking on provides a bit of "lubricant" for the material to slip over. I've got pretty good balance too which means I don't have to sit down to do it. I mostly wear shorts anyway which makes life easier, but then our winters are a bit milder than most, plus I work in a small, warm room all day.

With regards to shoes, I'm always wearing my runners( tennis shoes), but I'd love to be able to wear some of the shoes that are available. Alas, I can only sit back and slobber. Too much of a heel and I end up with sore spots from head to toe.

Cat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Judy I did have a brace when I had a little of a mangled foot, and it was to straighten it out, hanger (dont know how to spell) messed it up, it wasnt strong enough and I wore right through it.

But for me like if I am getting ready for school or anything I just put the leg on and then slip my pants on, like I wear baggy pants and there cute and comfortable and its awesome

I hope you found all your answers

Lesley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There shouldn't be too much of a problem with a b/k limb, in the beginning it may be a bit fatter so you need to allow for that, as someone else said, the wider "boot cut" trousers usually fit the best. Sometimes there can be a problems with the shoes on, so you might need to take the shoe off first. I am bilateral and just put my leg into the trousers like anyone else would.

I find shoes though a major problem and when I get a good pair try and buy several pairs, my limbs are made up to about one and quarer inch heel height, and I find chunky heels more stable than thin ones. Also have probs. with slip on shoes, unless they fit high up on the foot. Like everything else always see the best shoes when I can't afford them or don't need them. (lol)

Ann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is funny for me to be brought back to this posting....I have had my surgery and am not six months out....so glad to be done with that AFO brace. I love summer, it is easy to change my pants/shoes, with shorts. In winter I have found that putting my leg on last is easiest. It is still much quicker than my afo brace used to be...my leg just clicks on, where my afo had tons of velcro straps. MUCH happier now.... ;)

judy

utah

lbk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You bring up a really good question. Since I've been an amputee for many years, it's been a while since I had to deal with your particular situation but reading your post brought it all back to me.

For me, I always put on my prosthesis first and then long pants. Also, I wear mostly bootcut pants (being that I am a woman and these type of pants are currently in style). Bootcut pants have a slight flare at the bottom which makes putting them on much easier.

However, I remember when I first started wearing my prosthesis ( I am a BK amputee) bending my leg was very difficult and painful. At that time I would put long pants onto my prosthesis first, then attach the prosthetic leg to myself and then simply pull up the pants.

Anyway, I hope this is not too confusing and that it helps you out a bit.

Mellie

St. Louis, MO USA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm , pqants eh ??? i have a great idea to solve this itty bitty problem .... wearing dresses or skirts . Ooooooop's , i forgetted , oh ya , gusy dont wear theem ... oh well , i tried , reallly , i did try . :P :P :P

( sorry but i'm in one of my sort l of like funky twisted moods )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:blink: Ummmmm........yeah your right MJ.......then there's me :blink:

LOL

Cat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All:

Found this old thread / read it / and thought I would "toss" this out -

WHEN I was concerned about pants and stuff (I have learned to dress the legs first and then fit myself into them), all of my pants were taken to a seamstress.

I had her put an "invisible zipper" on the inseam of each leg. The result was easy access to the leg areas without any affect on the look of the pant or how they appeared.

Worked very well at the time.

ED

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×