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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
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The Long Thread

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Hi all,

From today I'm going to post a new question in this thread every day for you all to answer.

Some will be serious, some funny, some might be just a little silly.

The rules are......

Post one answer for each question.

Once I post a new question don't post things in regards to the previous question.

I will post my answer before I post the next question.

Clear as mud? :lol:

Question of the day is...

Who, outside of your close family, motivates you the most?

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I will post my answer first, but I am not sure how well it fits in with the question :D

When I was first an amputee 8 years back - the person who motivated me most was Heather Mills. She came and visited all the amputees from the bomb and she was such an influence on me to firstly, keep trying with the walking and secondly, I thought I would never be able to ride a bike again, I was way too nervous to try. She told me to go home and get on my bike and keep trying until I could do it, ever since then I have lived by these rules and I plan to for the rest of my life.

Anytime that I ever have a down moment however, motivation comes from the band U2. When I went to see them it was one of the most amazing times of my life. I was there with my brother (I know he is close family and all that) and it was probably the best moment of my life (was about 5 people back from the stage, standing of course). If I ever feel down, I whip out the U2 dvds and cds, put them on and it makes me think of that moment and I get the energy keep going. Talk about inspirational music (for me :D).

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Perfect answer :)

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When I came home from the hospital after my amputation, my attitude was: Why Me Lord?

I had refused to take any pain medicine, (which I've explained many times before), and was laying on the bed, swinging my stump in the air, trying to relieve the pain. The television was on and a documentary about St. Judes Hospital and the children that go there.

I watched as these 8-9-10 year old (and of course all ages), children sucked it up and did what had to be done. I have never seen braver people anywhere - anytime.

They have been my guiding inspiration ever since.

Without question!!

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I have always been self-motivated. However, my wife (who is a nurse) works with Cerebral palsy kids, some of the worst affected in the UK. When I do need that kick up the backside I think of them.

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Guest bearlover
When I came home from the hospital after my amputation, my attitude was: Why Me Lord?

I had refused to take any pain medicine, (which I've explained many times before), and was laying on the bed, swinging my stump in the air, trying to relieve the pain. The television was on and a documentary about St. Judes Hospital and the children that go there.

I watched as these 8-9-10 year old (and of course all ages), children sucked it up and did what had to be done. I have never seen braver people anywhere - anytime.

They have been my guiding inspiration ever since.

Without question!!

I hear you Jim! I worked witj children with special needs...They break your heart..But realize how lucky you actually are!

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I was at the limb fitting centre at the Royal National Orthaepedic Hospital in Stanmore during the summer doing some physio. It was a week or so after I had come out of hospital and I hadn't had my leg yet. I was in the gym, kneeling on the bed doing balance exercises. A young lady walked into the gym, and the usual pleasantries were exchanged. She walked perfectly normally, and like a dummy I asked "Excuse me. Forgive me for me asking, but......are you an amputee?" She laughed. I thought "Omigod, what a prat I am, what on earth have I said?" So I said "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to offend you." She said "No, forgive me, I was thinking, what a lovely question. Yes I am an amputee. I lost both legs in the bombs last year." Like an even bigger prat, I blurted out "Blimey! That must have been a shock!"

I don't want to bore you with the triteness of my conversation, but it turned out that the young lady was Jill Hicks. I saw her running, hard and fast on the treadmill which I thought was incredible. Whenever I was over there she seemed to be there. We shared the odd cup of coffee and I've seen her a few times on the telly. I realised that my troubles were nothing compared to hers and she really has inspired me.

Falstaff

PS Mick, his progress and his pictures have also been inspirational to me....such a pity he's gone!

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That's a difficult one to answer because for me there is no one answer. At different times in my life there have been different people who have inspired and motivated me. Just as my life has changed at each stage there has been someone else who has come along and provided that motivation. In each case I think it is unlikely that the person concerned has been aware of how much they have helped.

Sorry if that is not a very good answer.

Sue

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Sue that's a perfect answer :)

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My Dad few with Douglas Bader and he gave me his book when I was about 13.

It helped me incredibly. Little did my Dad know at that time he was going to have a daughter that had to have her leg amputated.

Lynne

Calgary

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Whilst studing social care at college a few years ago we were asked at question "What kind of disability would you rather have if you had to have one".

I think at the time i said i'd rather be inpaired physically than lose one of my senses.

Now that i am impaired physically i stand by that, whilst i am still having to use a wheelchair, which is a pain and unforgiving at times to lose your sight, speech, hearing or other sense would be far worse.

I recently attended a disability forum with people of all imparments and in answer to your question it is those people who are impaired visually, or by being deaf or unable to speak or even smell and taste (my father lost the sense of smell and taste following a brain tumour) that motivate me.

It is one thing being in a wheelchair, but i can see the sun and the stars, hear laughter, tell me daughter i love her, smell summer flowers taste aromatic foods and as a bonus one day i will be able to walk again!

Neil :rolleyes:

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I guess I would have to say that my father is probably who has inspired me the most..does he count for "out side" my family since he has passed away?

My father, was a very good hearted man,and he would of given the shirt off of his back to help someone if they needed it. In his mid thirties, he never ran a way from the obligation of raising his daughter as a single parent.. He taught me that you will never know what you can't do unless you first try to do it... to just keep "going".. That, above all is what has kept me going since the day of my accident... I guess I just didn't know that when you come back "death", that there are things that you shouldn't be able to do.. From the first moment I finally became coherent in the hospital, it was just a matter of getting well enough....I never thought about "not" being able to do something.... Busted in half, left leg amputated,and broken in a bunch of other places, and learning to live with some of the problems that a brain injury can cause, my thoughts were..ok, let's get on with it... He taught me that there is no such thing as 'quit'...

Somewhere, along the lines of living life, this man taught me many things, but most of all, never to run away from what you need to face.. He, himself, faced a lot of adversity in life, and not once, did he ever say "why me", including the times when he was told how bad that most loving heart of his was, and in the final months, how cancer was going to take his life very soon..... In the remaining days, he faced it with such courage and grace, I can only hope that one day, I can hold my head up and die with as much dignity and grace as he did...

He, as well as his father before him, inspire me.... and now that he is gone, his memories, still inspire me and give me the courage to face the things I need to face.......to get on with living my life...

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There are many. But since we are close to the holidays the one that was the most moving moment was many many years ago. I was newly divorced and my kids were 2 & 3. It was a week before Christmas, no money, no food. As a matter of fact I sold plasma to by the kids milk and broke food as they still call it. I was selling car parts, welding and rebuilding carbs and going to nursing school fulltime. It was colder than a well diggers butt & I was outside under my 69 buick putting a starter in and a friend of mine pulled up the drive way in a huge old 4 door ford pick up. His name was Green Dick (Irish Santa clause) huge in the Bill W group I had been in for about 6 months. I got out from under my buick and walked over and he asked about the kids mindng themselves in front of TV he came in and procedded to place bag after bag of groceries on the counter. I said I have know idea when I can pay this back and he told me I could not. He reached in his pocket and pulled out 100 bucks good money 18 years a go and said go buy those kids something for Christmas.

He was always doing something to help someone and he got me into serving the underserved in my career as nursing. He died about 15 years ago, I still miss him and will never forget the real Santa Clause who visited the single mom in the inner city.

He motivated me than and still does even in joe suberbeia I still remember dirt poor, hungry, worried, but never alone. God has sent me many angels like this through my life.

When I have days like yesterday I think of angels like Higgy and Five String and those hear that read my goofy days and I know I will be alright.

Skully Cat

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The biggest influence on my life, the people who motivate me most, are my grandparents.

They struggled through wars and the depression while rasing families and working long hard hours. But they still had time to give to others and offer advice, help, or just be there to listen.

Sadly they are are no longer living so my memories are all I have of them but in some way that keeps them alive. I think of them at least once a day and often in times of difficulty I ask myself "what would they do?" The wisdom, strength and moments total fun they passed on to me I have tried to pass onto my children.

They inspire me, motivate me and the memories I have of them are priceless.

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Higgy - that me me weep! It reminds me so much of my Dad! He tells me, and others, how proud he is of my recovery.

Who inspired and motivated me - my very first boss - such a fantastic man, whose guidance and attitude inspired me, and still does! I haven't seen him for about 9 years, but he rang me the other week, to say that he had read an article I had done on body image - since losing my leg, and wanted to say hi and to wish me well. I feel that the guidance and wise counsel he gave me in my early career, enabled me to be a more confident person and to get where I am within my career.

Also, a book I read at High School - To Kill a Mockingbird - my all time favourite read!

Sue

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Next Question

If you were an animal what would you be?

(I told you some of these would be just silly) :lol: :lol:

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I'm with Sue on this one. No ONE person has done the job of motivating me the most. There have been different people along the way.

Most of my motivation since my amputation has been from my legman Theron. He lost his leg at the age of six and has helped me realize that I can do anything I set my mind to.

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I would be one of my Pugs. Not just any pug, but one of mine. They are so pampered and spoiled.

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I would be a polar bear. The solitary life, roaming all that uninhabited space.

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If I were an animal in Africa, chances are I'd be dead or in a cage. Nope, don't think I'd like to be an animal with humans the way they are....

Although I might consider being one of my mother's dogs.... :rolleyes:

Or one of those elephants in Singapore that have stopped growing tusks (yup, ain't evolution grand?) and get looked after by the community in ele-havens....

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I think if I had to be an animal and not a human (which is my preferred option) I would like to be a dolphin. they always look as if they are having so much fun and they have a great community spirit.

Sue

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I'd be a pony on one of the Shetland Isles...fiercely independent...braving the elements with the wind in my mane...:rolleyes:

Lizzie :)

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