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Hoggett

Cold Stumps anyone?

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Hello,

I have had my limbs off today, wearing my shrinker socks, however I have noticed a few times that if I leave my limbs off - in bed or when I am in my chair, they are freezing cold, so today I wrapped them both up in a blanket, to try and get them warmed up, I was like that for about 2 hours, checked them still freezing, is there something wrong with me (I know that already :lol: ) or is that the norm?

I don't have a warm house, firstly because of the dog, Blackie and secondly I can't afford to keep it warm!

Ian

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I get a very cold stump easily but I know I have bad circulation in that leg and always assumed that was why. I do need to take extra care to ensure that it is kept well wrapped up if I don't have my limb on and have been known to wear a sock in bed on that leg although it doesn't always stay on.

Sue

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Yes Ian,

Definitely have a cold stump. Think it's normal.

I put my socks on a radiator to warm up and then put them on, even been known to use a hot pack in the winter.

Lynne

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In cooler weather, my stump gets very cold.. or after being outside in the winter.

What I have done, is taken a two ply sock, a piece of elastic and a snap (which can be purchased in sewing department) and use it when I have my leg/liner off. I use the two ply sock under the shrink sock too in the winter.. Anyway, you can hammer the snap into a piece of elastic band that is long enough to go around your thigh. Use said band to keep the two ply sock in place. It sure helps me keep my stump warm in cooler weather... My cp had given me one to try that had silver threads in it, that where supposed to help with phantom pain, but I find that the compression of the shrink sock helps the best when they are bad..

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Hi Ian

Yes my stump gets real cold also. I am still wondering why that is.

Lesley

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Hello,

I have had my limbs off today, wearing my shrinker socks, however I have noticed a few times that if I leave my limbs off - in bed or when I am in my chair, they are freezing cold, so today I wrapped them both up in a blanket, to try and get them warmed up, I was like that for about 2 hours, checked them still freezing, is there something wrong with me (I know that already :lol: ) or is that the norm?

I don't have a warm house, firstly because of the dog, Blackie and secondly I can't afford to keep it warm!

Ian

Its normal for me, I generally put loads of socks on to keep them warm, but try to keep them moving to keep the circulation going.

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I'm afraid it appears to be "normal," Ian!

Mine gets cold, too... and I NEVER had to worry about feeling cold until I became an amp! Someone once told me that it is related to circulation... specifically, that the way the blood vessels are joined together in an amputation, there is nothing to slow the blood down (like, say, a foot, with its myriad of capillaries) long enough for it to be able to warm the tissue in the stump.

I honestly don't know if that's an accurate theory... but I do know that my full-length leg does not get cold, while my stump can be icy to the touch. Since Cat knows about deep tissue matters, perhaps we can get a "professional opinion?"

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My stump has always felt cold at night, even when the rest of my body isn't, even in summer I wear a sock at night. I agree, I think it's a normal thing.

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I'm afraid it appears to be "normal," Ian!

Mine gets cold, too... and I NEVER had to worry about feeling cold until I became an amp! Someone once told me that it is related to circulation... specifically, that the way the blood vessels are joined together in an amputation, there is nothing to slow the blood down (like, say, a foot, with its myriad of capillaries) long enough for it to be able to warm the tissue in the stump.

I honestly don't know if that's an accurate theory... but I do know that my full-length leg does not get cold, while my stump can be icy to the touch. Since Cat knows about deep tissue matters, perhaps we can get a "professional opinion?"

Hi Cherylm,

So it appears that all of us suffer from this problem, I thought it could be to do with the plumbing and how they have to sew everything back together. As you say mine are often icy cold even if it is a nice warm day.

Thanks for your replys, it seems I'm not alone.

Ian

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If you want to check for circulation then there is a pulse that runs behind your knee called the popliteal pulse. If you bend your knee to 90deg and raise it (crossing your legs is a good way to do it) then push your fingers in quite hard behind your knee, you will be able to find it. Someone else might need to do it because it is hard to do on yourself. Try it on your good leg first to see if you can find it or not.

Other things to look for in circulation are hairs on your stump (if you ever had them?). If there is poor circulation then it is likely that you will have no hairs, or are a woman :D

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mines always cold whenever mi legs off. :rolleyes:

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My quads seem to be about the same, but there is a noticeable difference in the hamstring area of my stump in feeling colder.

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I've been paying more attention to this since this thread, and have noticed something I hadn't before. When I first take my leg off, my stump is cold, after a short time, it gets warmer, and is fine the rest of the night. Maybe this has something to do with the Harmony system, since it is such a different leg from anything I've ever had, anyone else with a Hrmony notice this?

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