Jump to content
Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
sarahsaifa

Going through security in a foreign country?

Recommended Posts

I'm travelling to Japan later this year and my leg always sets off airport metal detectors, so I was wondering how people deal with this in a country where you don't speak the language.

The only thing I could think of is tracking down a japanese doctor and getting them to write me a note or learning how to say it myself haha.

Ta! :happy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I travel to Viet Nam each summer leading a Cross Cultural Experience tour. What I do is just pull up my pant leg--if I do not have shorts on--and they have gotten the problem. They usually smile and just wave me through.

Peace, Beth Marie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

I travel to Viet Nam each summer leading a Cross Cultural Experience tour. What I do is just pull up my pant leg--if I do not have shorts on--and they have gotten the problem. They usually smile and just wave me through.

Peace, Beth Marie

Exactly! get it out!... be open, body language will work, just make it obvious... people of all nationalities have artificial legs, they will realise the same as any of the officials who speak English anywhere else... I wouldn't worry about it... what's the worst that could happen? nothing that wouldn't happen anywhere else I'd suggest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The language of sight is universal. I always wear shorts and they know before I even get to security.

Carry light track pants on your carry on luggage if you think you might get cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not Asian countries you have to worry about. I have never had any problem in any of them. Never had to show my leg. Sometimes I do have to say wooden leg but thats it. The problem begins in western countries especially USA and Canada. The governments have people paranoid and the security people are mostly ignorant and rude. I am taken my family to Canada soon and the worst part is always going into and leaving the airport there. A couple of years ago they actually pushed my 5 year old daughter back because she was ahead of me and they couldn't see her boarding pass. Refused to let her pass even a few feet until I reached them. You won't have problems in Japan, I worked there and was going in and out and they never bothered me once.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It is not Asian countries you have to worry about. I have never had any problem in any of them. Never had to show my leg. Sometimes I do have to say wooden leg but thats it. The problem begins in western countries especially USA and Canada. The governments have people paranoid and the security people are mostly ignorant and rude. I am taken my family to Canada soon and the worst part is always going into and leaving the airport there. A couple of years ago they actually pushed my 5 year old daughter back because she was ahead of me and they couldn't see her boarding pass. Refused to let her pass even a few feet until I reached them. You won't have problems in Japan, I worked there and was going in and out and they never bothered me once.

Jeff

Jeff - no one should push a 5 year old child in any way, shame on them. I believe because of what has happened in some countries such as the United States and the the sometimes heightened risk, that the security has to be tighter than in some other countries possibly. It's a pain in the butt, but we have seen the consequences when security does not check people carefully. I will not put up with any rudeness,but I have found as long as I am nice and ignore them if they aren't...everything is fine. I make it my job to make them smile or laugh :biggrin: The world just isn't a happy place to travel in all of the time, and there are some crazies out there. I have never really had any problem in any of the places in the US or Canada where I have been, but I know to expect inspections. No one likes it, but it's the world we live in at the moment. I don't think in any way that we are paranoid, I think we have been burned in the past when we have been complacent, and we don't want to see that happen again if our countries can help it. If it means traveling safe, I have no problem with them checking me as long as they follow the rules that they are supposed to. Hope your travels go smoothly...

Flip

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In all the times I've traveled since joining the ranks of the "disabled," I've only been treated badly on two occasions. One struck me as particularly odd, as it was at the Atlanta airport just after leaving the ACA conference! You would think that they would have had plenty of experience with amputees that weekend, wouldn't you? (Or maybe they'd had too much experience with amputees, by that point!)

The first time I hit a "snag," though, I was not yet an amputee. I was post-op from having my right foot surgically rebuilt, and I was in a "moon boot" walking cast and using a walker to stabilize myself. When I got to the metal detectors, the TSA staff demanded that I take off the moon boot, pass it and the walker through the x-ray and metal detector ahead of me, and that I then WALK, unsupported, through the metal detector! When I told them that this was impossible, they seized my purse and carry-on bag, pushed me to the side and YELLED for "security!"

I pitched a fit. Many LAX and TSA people gathered around me. The TSA screener kept insisting that I HAD to remove my boot...I kept saying that was not possible and trying to suggest alternatives. Eventually someone in a supervisory position arrived. By that time, I was yelling right along with the TSA person. So I yelled my story to the supervisor, who said, "we've had a warning about a possible attack from someone who appears disabled." To which I replied, "Well, why didn't they just SAY so?"

Eventually, I was permitted to walk with my walker through the metal detector (which, of course, went off), and then I got a "swab and pat-down," which would have been perfectly fine with me right from the start, and which satisfied the TSA folks that I was NOT a terrorist. :wacko: Since then, I've had very few troubles. When I first flew post-amp, one of my leg guys put me in touch with a fellow BKA who actually works as a TSA screener at LAX. He gave me scoop about what the screeners are and aren't allowed to do with amputees, and he told me that if, at any time, I felt that I was being abused, I should just stop dead and demand that a supervisor be called. (He even looked up the work schedule and told me who that supervisor would be in my terminal!)

Like Flip, I've learned that being pleasant can help the situation. I've gotten in the habit of wearing shorts for flights if at all possible. (If it really is too cold for that, I'll wear wide-legged slacks which are easy to pull up.) The minute I approach the security checkpoint, I tell the first TSA person I see that I have a prosthesis and it's going to set off the metal detector, so can they just arrange to "swab and pat-down" now? If I could hop, like some of our members, I'd take off the leg, run it through x-ray and the rest, and hop on through...but that is still impossible for me! :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HI,

I had my first airport experience as an amputee this past Saturday at the phoenix airport.

My daughter had a 5am flight to Miami(she is going to the Galapagos for 10 days, a girlscout trip)

The lady at check in gave me a pass so I could be at the gate with Katie while waiting for her flight.

I had to send my cane through the x ray machine,( very unstable I was as I broke the little toe badly on my left foot the night before ) then I told the screener about my prosthetic leg. She stated that I didn't have to take off my shoes or leg.

I was pulled aside, had the wand used on me, then a pat down and then the swab of my hands and my "leg".

All in all not a bad experience.

The funny thing was that katie had to wear her uniform and her vest has pins and charms and such all over it,

she went right on through without setting the machine off.

derrick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×