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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
Marc_L

Hiyas ... Marc here.

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Hello all!

I've been reading this site for a few years now, but after finally exceeding the limit of threads that I wanted to respond to, I figured it was time to finally sign up! I look forward to interacting with y'all after lurking here for so long.

I'm a left knee disarticulation. Sorry, but I don't know the appropriate acronym. It's not really AK or BK ... it's just @K.

My story, in a nutshell ... Feb 1984, HS Junior ... auto/ped/auto accident (with me in the middle). Luckily, my right leg came away with a simple break (I still have the metal rod in my fibia). The left leg wasn't as lucky. After 13 operations over the next 18 months for nerve grafts and skin grafts and bone grafts etc., an infection showed up in the lower leg that we couldn't control. I had the disarticulation surgery over the summer between HS Graduation and my freshman year @ College.

I got my first prosthetic leg a few months into my college freshman year ... and I think I'm on my 5th one since then.

Over these 20-some years, I've been living inconspicuously amongst the bi-peds. Unless you went swimming with me, you couldn't really tell that I was a mono-ped. I can't tell you how many people that I've suprised at work. They'd known me for YEARS, but then finally ask me the "right" question that'll get me to spill the beans. Their jaws hit the floor.

Now that I've pushed past 40, it's not as easy to go all day, 16+ hours, day after day after day like I used to. I'm getting so frustrated with my relatively new socket that I'm seriously thinking about how I could put my career on hold for a year or so while I go after an osseo-integrated unit. I hate how my day can be RUINED by a dime-sized sore spot that I have to feel, step after step after step. I think that a year of pain and re-hab would be worth it if I could toss out my final socket.

I'm an electrical engineer by trade, SWM, ... somewhat of a nerd, video gamer ... but also into working in the garage on my Jeep mods and/or going hot-air ballooning w/ my pilot friends (I'm just crew, not a pilot). I love it here in the SW USA. I'm currently living in Arizona, but my heart is in New Mexico.

Looking forward to getting to know y'all.

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Hi Marc, welcome... there are many similarities between us, the time it took to lose the leg after the accident, mine was in 1983, lost the leg in 84...

Sounds stupid, but think extremely carefully about the Osseointegration route, it's usually only done when every other avenue has been exhausted, it's major stuff and I'm not sure it's that easy to come back if it goes wrong. I'd try everything before that, maybe even revision to AK which is what I am, and suffer relatively little for it.

By the Left Knee Disarticulation acronyn I reckon is LKD

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G'day :biggrin:

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Marc - go to your leg person and get him/her to make your socket fit correctly...or make a new socket. It shouldn't be rubbing. Osseointegration is serious business. A little adjusting or a new socket might be the answer.

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Hello Marc,

Welcome to the forum.

I can relate to your frustration (as can all of us here) regarding the severity of pain one can have from the smallest of blemishes.

I lost my left foot when sandwiched between the front end of a car and a slab of concrete (foundation to a motel sign) and spent 6 weeks in the hospital (going to surgery every other day). This was back in 1978 (when I was 12).

I have an aunt living in New Mexico and find that state quite beautiful. One year, I will make it to that annual hot air balloon festival they always have. I was planning on going this year but other trips precluded it.

I've only flown in a hot air balloon once but never landed with it. I found it very peaceful; that is, until I jumped out of it. :cool: I handed my camera to the balloon pilot and asked him to snap a pic of my buddy and I as we fell away from the balloon. So everything is so quiet, then we do our count as we were perched on the edge of the basket, then (as if in slow motion) fall backward out. In the midst of the quiet, as I'm smiling back up at the pilot, I hear the 'click' sound from my camera. Then as our downward motion increases (you know, that gravity thing) the noise picks up and we roll to our bellies and do a mini dive before it was time to track and deploy. Really cool experience. :biggrin:

Anyway, welcome again.

Amy

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Hi, Marc, and welcome...glad you decided to "de-lurk!"

My first inclination, reading about your socket situation, would be to try and get a correct fit on the one you have, or to be re-cast. Osseointegration is a fascinating procedure -- I'm sure you must have been reading Insane's (Paul's) updates on his procedure, so you should have an idea of just how long a recovery can take. (That and, as you enter the wonderful world of middle-age, there are just some days when your energy is NOT what it was in your youth!)

I'm in my mid-50s and became an amp at 50. For the longest time, I blamed my amputation for the fact that I wasn't able to do as much as "before." Then I started talking to friends around my own age...and discovered that bi-peds have the same diminishing of energy! We all made choices about what we REALLY wanted to do, and saved our energy for those things. Soooooo....I can't blame the amputation any more...I'm just your basic "old gal!"

That said, an ill-fitting socket can certainly slow down any amp of any age!

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Hi Marc, sorry for being slow with the invite, but welcome aboard. It's nice that you've decided to join in with such nice friendly ppl. I've been around here, on and off since 2003, sorry to say lately more off than on. :-( But no matter how long I'm away, I never forget all the help, comfort, support and yes even some laughs we've shared. Which helps in so many ways to keep your courage up and your heart feeling young and no matter what, always continue to move forward.

My sister just moved to Arizona last Jan and loves it. However, coming from Maine, that kind of heat is really a challenge to get use to, tho they seem to be managing, knowing they won't have to put up with any more Maine winters. Which sounds good, but.... not for me. :smile: Tho I believe, like you, her heart is really still in Maine.

Good Luck

Sheila

Keep Smiling :smile:

Maine-USA

LBK-13yrs

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