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C-Leg X2 Official News Release

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Finally some "official" news about the new C-Leg, though unfortunately doesn't appear to be available until 2011

http://www.wramc.army.mil/NewsAndEvents/me...spx?Id=438&

Dec. 8, 2009 -- Staff Sgt. Alfredo “Freddy” De los santos lost all but four inches of his right leg to an improvised explosive device attack in Afghanistan. During his rehabilitation, he found learning to walk again difficult with existing prosthetic technology. With his previous prosthetic knee, the C-Leg, De los santos was able to walk, with discomfort, using two canes. That was until two weeks ago, when he was fitted with the new X2 microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee. Now, he can walk up and down stairs and steep inclines, jump, step over hurdles and walk backward — all without support.

The medical research project that spawned the X2, executed by prosthetics maker Otto Bock, was funded by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command in support of the Military Amputee Research Program and administered by the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center.

De los santos is one of 30 wounded warriors at Walter Reed and Brooke Army Medical Center, Texas, being fitted with the X2. John Warren, the Walter Reed prostheticist who works with De los santos, said the shortness of De los santos’ residual leg makes the advanced capabilities offered by the X2 ideal for him.

“Freddy has to work extra hard to stabilize himself within the socket,” Warren said. “So having a knee that’s helping him, at least freeing him up to an extent where he can focus on what his limb’s doing inside the socket, to place his steps and make everything smooth.”

The X2’s microprocessor sensors measure multiple factors and perform complex analysis to determine the appropriate position and motion of the knee. This can be particularly useful when a wearer is standing at rest. Continual resting total body weight on the intact side of the body puts great strain on the intact knee, hip, back and shoulder, which can cause further health issues for the amputee.

Adele Levine, the Walter Reed physical therapist who works with De los santos, said when standing still, most of us shift our weight back and forth, one foot to the other and most above-the-knee amputees are always standing on their intact side. She noted that after standing on the C-Leg for six months De los santos is already experiencing knee pain. “That’s sort of a glimpse into the future, she said. “With this leg he’s been able rest his intact side. In just one week of wearing the X2, his knee pain completely went away. Just this simple thing alone is worth its weight.”

Marine Gunnery Sgt. Marcus Wilson wore a C-Leg and in three years has had two surgeries on his intact knee. He said the relief with the X2 was almost immediate. “I don’t have any more knee pain, I don’t have any more hip pain, because everything is evened-out now.

“In basic mode, when the knee joint detects there isn’t any movement, and they flex the knee a little bit and they bear their weight on it, it locks up,” Warren explained. “But as soon as they move again it detects the motion and frees the knee up, so they can walk.”

“The new leg is like being in heaven,” De los santos said. “When I got this leg, it’s like I went from night to day. I can pretty much do everything now. I went to Busch Gardens, and I was walking all day long. I got on all the rides. I only take it off when I go to sleep.”

Levine praised the extra stability provided by the X2. “If you have to think every time you put your foot down, ‘Am I going to step on a rock? Is my knee going to buckle?’ You can’t do much except focus on your walking. The X2 helps with that.”

Wilson, who hopes one day to run in a marathon, agreed. “Having something that is completely worthwhile and user-friendly, that’s the key,” he said. “Just go about your day-to-day activities and the knee does what it’s supposed to do, and you don’t have to think about it.”

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I think the old C-Leg is already really stable at rest. Otto Bock should consider ways of reducing the cost of the C-Leg instead, then more people would be able to buy one. Although the C-Leg is a good product, other companies are making fast progress and are hot on its heels

My battery charger packed up once while I was in the far east, when I got back I thought I better buy a back up so budgeted for around £40-£50 (its only a charger after all)......no problem they said...its a snip at only £450 !! Hmm it may be a specialist product but I get the distinct feeling that Im being exploited

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My battery charger packed up once while I was in the far east, when I got back I thought I better buy a back up so budgeted for around £40-£50 (its only a charger after all)......no problem they said...its a snip at only £450 !! Hmm it may be a specialist product but I get the distinct feeling that Im being exploited

Just replaced one of mine and they charged my prot guy $185.00 CDN.....which I thought was outrageous..........until I read your statement!!!!!

ED

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The owner of Otto Bock bought his 50meter Superyacht (a real peach) a few years back based on the expected sales of prosthetics after the start the start of Iraq/Afghan wars and projected sales to the military. He now has a bigger one on order, yes I think the prices for bock kit is high.

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