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hannahc410

does anyone regret an elective amp

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Ive pretty much made up my mind after much reaserch and talking to the docs that an elective lbk amp would be right for me. But I was just wondering if anyone has any regrets about there decision and what was the hardest adjustment? x

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Not sure what other options you are given. As for me, I was told to either not put weight on my right foot if it hurt or try to mask the pain with pain killers. So being active this seemed like an bad way to spend the next few decades. I am only about 4 1/2 months past my surgery so time will only tell. Of course it is a drag having to contemplate some actions of the day, but I was doing the same with the real foot for the past year or so. For me it seems like things are progressing every week and feel like I am better even now than on surgery day.

I would never wish the decision on anyone. However, life is just to short to let a foot hold you back. I am sure some of the AK's and Hip people just roll their eyes at us BK's. It really seems possible to do anything you would want to do with a BKA. But only you know how bad your foot is and how hard you are willing to work to return to a "normal" level for yourself.

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No regrets here!! It was the best decision I ever made medically speaking. Infact I wish I would have done it sooner and not wasted years trying to save a bad leg.

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Hi. I'm another elective amp. I'm a LAK since 2005. The amount of trauma i had did help me make the decision. But make no mistake, we were about 20 surgeries into the "save it" program. In my head, i felt i knew what had to be done. But to help me a little more, i summoned the doc and asked him a some questions. Something like this:

"If i keep the leg, what should i expect out of the finished product."

Doc says- Eventually you'll probably be able to walk, but with with a cane and a limp. You'll be in a brace to hold your foot up due to nerve damage and pain killers will be part of daily life from now on. Due to the amount of missing bone, it'll also be very fragile, once we get it all to hold together.

"If this were you laying here, what would you choose?"

Doc says- I think i'd amputate.

"If this was your son laying here and you had to make the call, what would you do?"

Doc says- I'd have it amputated. No doubt.

"What's the chances of saving at least the knee?"

Doc says- None. If we could do that, we'd be able to keep the rest, too.

"Do it."

Doc says- Ok. We've alreay got you scheduled for surgery monday morning. I'll just change the procedure...

This was on friday. One week since i was hit. That following monday, i had the amputation done and was sent on to inpatient physical therapy in my home town. I was there for a week and sent home. Exactly 3 weeks to the day since i got hit. You see, i had just moved and changed jobs. No insurance.

Though the trick is to not look back- looking back, i know i made the right decision. I am definitely what you may call handicapped, but i do alot of things now that i would've never done again if i had kept that leg. I've heard it said many times in one way or another, but remember this- Amputation was not the PROBLEM. Amputation was the SOLUTION.

I hope my experience contributes to your comfort with your decision. Once it is made, try to remember:

Life is TODAY. RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW. Not yesterday, not tomorrow. TODAY. :wink:

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The people who might have regrets following an elective amp are likely to be those who were "promised the world" by their surgeon, or those who go into it thinking that recovery "will happen in an instant." Some folks who have continuing problems with especially severe and long-lasting phantom pains probably also regret that amputation wasn't the solution they'd hoped it would be.

But there are an awful lot of us out here --myself included -- who are thankful for the procedure that gave us a healthier, stronger, more active lifestyle than the one we would have had with a full complement of limbs. Shane is right...for us, amputation was not a problem, it was the solution. Many of us wish we'd made the choice to amputate sooner, now that we know what the outcome is, but I tend to think that having time to think through and research the procedure and recovery process can help you be more certain about the rightness of your choice.

I mentioned on another thread that I'm about "99 and 44/100 percent sure" that I made the right decision...that tiny fraction of one percent is because I have the occasional day when I wish that there had been a way to save the leg, which, unfortunately, there didn't seem to be. I wasn't ready to dedicate the rest of my life to constant unsuccessful surgical attempts to keep a limb that would be nothing more than a hindrance to me...I had a LIFE to live! And I'm now living it.

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No regrets either. I still haven't got over the relief of not having pain and infections, everything else is a bonus.

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no regret here i add 15 op befor amp. but it did not work still in pain all the time so i hopped to have it off but it is better now not good at the frist op but i would have it off again from the first op i have add 5 more but it is st ill better then when i add the frist op i wish they would have amp then but i am a bad one to take notice off as every thing went wrong but i would still have it off now as i can ride bike pluss go to the gym an walk all day with ease and no nore pain so good look all the best dave

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This is still a very hard question for me to answer. I fought amputation for a while before finally making the choice to amputate. I waited and hoped that my leg would get better but it never did, sounds like madlegs post above. I could still use it but not without a lot of pain. Maybe if I had just kept trying it might have gotten better; however, it seemed highly unlikely, and after getting over 5 different medical opinions. I think when one faces this choice you can not regret it and make peace it is the best option. It took me a while, and I am still adjusting but I feel I made the right choice, and pain free. The choice does not make you good or bad, it just makes you different. I hope this opinion helps.

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