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cherylm

What's Your Secret...

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I've been thinking about Mick's post on the "Walking" thread on how he dealt with a walk on a "bad leg day." We ALL have them, at least occasionally, and they can seem to come out of nowhere! Sometimes they're physically painful...sometimes they're psychologically troubling...sometimes they're simply strange. (A couple of mornings ago, it took me nine–count 'em, NINE–attempts to don my leg...nearly 45 minutes of taking everything off, putting it all back on, and standing there,bouncing and wiggling,trying to make pin hit locking mechanism. By the end, I was both laughing and crying.) The question becomes, how do you cope with a bad leg day?

Soooo...here's the deal. Tell us about a bad leg day. It can be tragic, painful, or hilarious. Tell about what made it a bad leg day...and what you did to try and cope with it. Did physical activity help? Did you just have to "take a day off" and wait it out? (I had to do that one, once,and it made me feel just dreadful...far worse than the pain I was in!) Did a healthy sense of humor help you make it through? Did you treat yourself to a massage...or distract yourself with a hobby?

On my "day of the nine donnings," I coped with the stress of standing there, legless, by calling work and making a bit of a joke about it: "Hi, boss, it's Cheryl...I'm going to be a little late, 'cause I'm on attempt number FIVE to get my leg to stay on, and it's looking like this could go on for a while! See you sometime!" (Insert somewhat hysterical giggle here.) That gave me a chance to calm down, take a deep breath, and then go back to leg-donning with renewed energy. Once I got it on, and it felt "weird" to me, I used work as an excuse to not think about the weirdness. After work, when it was still feeling "weird," I took it off after dinner and stretched out on the sofa and went to sleep. The next morning (yep...I slept on the sofa all night) everything was back to normal and my leg felt like my leg again.

What's YOUR story........??

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Luckily my 'bad leg days' are few and far between. It puts me in a terrible mood when they hit. I try to just carry on with my normal routine the best way I can. Some of those days can be made bearable with a couple of Advil and perseverance, some are just plain terrible all day long.

My jobs require a lot of leg work. I depend on my legs. Crutches won't do. I can put up with a little discomfort, but pain will ruin my day faster than anything. My pain usually stems from an infected hair follicle due to sock mismanagement. That's right folks, my own stupidity will ruin either the next day or the day thereafter. I have tried to get better along these lines as I've had enough pain to last me a lifetime.

I can honestly say that I have never gone a day without wearing my leg. Even when I had a hickey the size of a golf ball on the bottom, I managed to get into my socket.

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I have the occasional "off" day when nothing feels right. There is no rhyme or reason to it. And, thankfully, these days are few and far between. I have learned to get thru it as best I can and know that tomorrow will likely be just fine.

I've never not been able to get my leg on. That had to be so frustating, Cheryl! Back when I was in the pin system there were a few times when it took several attempts to get it in but with this vac system that never happens.

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It was, Marcia! When I got my very first leg, it sometimes took me three or four times to get it firmly "on," but for years now, it's been automatic...I just wake up, pop it on, and walk off to start the day. The "day of nine donnings" was particularly frustrating because I'd already gotten a leg on TWICE that morning: I woke up, popped it on, walked into the bathroom, popped it off, popped on my shower leg, took care of business...then went through 45 minutes of hell until I heard that pin snap in!

I have real hopes that my next socket will be some sort of suction/vacuum system. I've had this one for almost nine months, and usually I'd be swimming in sox by now...but I've only had to add one three-ply half-sock so far. I've never had much in the way of problems with my pin suspension, but I've heard such good reports of suction suspensions that I really want to give one a try. :smile:

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Hi All,

I am SO glad to be back on the forum--it has been a very busy semester.

It is funny--not ha ha--but strange that yesterday I had a "bad leg day." Thankfully these are few and between although I can really emphasize with trying too many times to get my leg on--thankfully not nine times. Yerday I was at a big event in Los Angeles and was on my leg for many hours and then I ended up having to walk up a very steep hill and then attend a reception on the Queen Mary until 10pm. For some reason I have developed something like a callus on my knee and it was rubbing--I was very glad to get back to the hotel and take the leg off. I haven't had any rubbing so I don't know what happened. When I get home on Tuesday I will call my leg guy.

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I have had more than a few 'bad leg days' the last month or so.... the left side socket had got way too big and I have been waiting for a new pair of legs to be made. I've also got a new Prosthetist ... the old one who'd I'd only had for under a year ... and just getting used to ... has moved on ... and so have had the new pair made by a new one ... and good as they are ... I have to get used to them ... and they have to get used to me. I have just collected the new pair ... and they are 'ok' I think, but quite different ... so am having to go back to basics and break them in quite gently.

So going back to Cheryls question ... I am probably a bit like Neal, and 'know' I get quite grumpy when the legs are uncomfortable. For the most I will still wear them ... but as others who have skin grafting will probably recognize ... all is dependant on how the graft is ... So for me, anything which is slightly uncomfortable on the grafted side I will be taking the leg off and checking every half hour or so, adding socks, taking away socks etc. etc. Sometimes though,I just have to admit defeat and leave the leg off and use the wheelchair ... I think I am getting better at this as I get older... LOL ... I now quite often act before I get any skin breakdown and in times of 'bad fitting' (as in the last month) I have left the leg off for parts of the day .... usually spend the first hour moaning to myself about it ... then usually just reorganize things so that I can do things from the wheelchair. Usually its sods law though, it will be at the very time when I want or need to be wearing my leg.

Ann

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Hi,

I would like to know how a good day feels :biggrin::blink:

Too many bad days to even begin talking about!

Lynne

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Hi,

I would like to know how a good day feels :biggrin::blink:

Too many bad days to even begin talking about!

Lynne

Hopefully there's some good days on their way Lynne.

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Wishing you good days really soon. :smile:

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Lynne, you've been through so much! I also hope some better days are headed your way.

It does raise a question, though, if you wouldn't mind trying to answer: When the vast majority of your days are "bad leg days," how do you go about trying to deal with the business of everyday living?

Before my surgery, when every day was painful and a struggle, I kept myself together by believing that, eventually, SOMETHING would work to let me get on with life. Fortunately, my amputation was that "something." If I'd wound up facing all the prosthesis problems you've had with your medical condition, it would have been a struggle to keep myself going. You have my admiration, there!

What helps you do it?

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I have them occasionally and I think we all do unfortunately.

My best however was on a ski run right underneath the chairlift. I was skiing fast and making nice turns, and then it happened, the dreaded fall (or as we call it, the YARD SALE). Skis went flying, goggles flew off and my poles were 25 feet up the run. I was skiing with another instructor and after saying "are you alright"; he said check out your leg. I had bent my pylon to 45 degrees away from my body. So there I am standing under the chair lift (on my good leg) with my boot at a 45 degree angle in the air. My buddy rounded up my gear; I clicked into one ski and skied down the rest of the run on one ski. The whole time people on the lift were yelling stop, lay down, he must be in shock. We were done for the day and were free skiing in our non-instructor jackets. We were followed down by two ski patrol who finally realized it was us. Freaked out quite a few people on the way back to the instructor lounge.

This was my ski leg so I was done for the day but not for walking. My leg doc put on a thicker gauge titanium pylon. Lesson learned!

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Now THAT'S a "bad leg day!" Bad leg...bad, bad leg.......... :tongue:

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Lynne, you've been through so much! I also hope some better days are headed your way.

It does raise a question, though, if you wouldn't mind trying to answer: When the vast majority of your days are "bad leg days," how do you go about trying to deal with the business of everyday living?

Before my surgery, when every day was painful and a struggle, I kept myself together by believing that, eventually, SOMETHING would work to let me get on with life. Fortunately, my amputation was that "something." If I'd wound up facing all the prosthesis problems you've had with your medical condition, it would have been a struggle to keep myself going. You have my admiration, there!

What helps you do it?

Thanks for the well wishes, that's a good question Cherylm.

I deal with everyday living by just getting on with it. I have lived most of the last five years in a wheelchair or hopping. I find it totally frustrating, like everyone else I just want to be able to put my leg on and get on with my life. I now know I can't but I will never stop trying. So I guess I am not unlike you in the sense that I still believe something will work for me.....one day! I struggle on, I try to wear my present leg for at least some of the time each day although I cannot weight bear through it without extreme pain. My present prosthetist is investigation other socket options for me, it just takes longer than I would like.

There have been times when I have quite literally been suicidal, especially the first four years, when my rehab consultant was so ineffective. Fortunately I no longer have to see him and have found another prosthetist who seems to know what he is doing. I still have some hope of improving things.

So either I am very strong, totally stupid or .........or both :

Good thread Cherylm.

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I deal with everyday living by just getting on with it. I have lived most of the last five years in a wheelchair or hopping. I find it totally frustrating, like everyone else I just want to be able to put my leg on and get on with my life. I now know I can't but I will never stop trying. So I guess I am not unlike you in the sense that I still believe something will work for me.....one day! I struggle on, I try to wear my present leg for at least some of the time each day although I cannot weight bear through it without extreme pain. My present prosthetist is investigation other socket options for me, it just takes longer than I would like.

There have been times when I have quite literally been suicidal, especially the first four years, when my rehab consultant was so ineffective. Fortunately I no longer have to see him and have found another prosthetist who seems to know what he is doing. I still have some hope of improving things.

So either I am very strong, totally stupid or .........or both :

I think, you are very strong Lynne ... you have to keep believing

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I agree with Ann. You are strong, Lynne. Stupid? No way.

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My bad day was finding out that I could not were my vacuum leg any more because my treatment of cancer was causing me to have problems when wearing it. It was causing me to have blisters and black and bluing from the vacuum. Have to were my pin leg until I finish chemo treatments.

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I had my first 'bad leg day' yesterday. I thought I was coming down with some bug or other. But now I read this it describes to a tee how I felf. Wow--and I thought I was immune to the negative psychological issues that can arise with amputation.

There really is nothing better than having contact with other amputees to help you along the way is there?

Thanks

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