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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
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CaptainKB

Phantom Pain Treatment

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Hello, I have scheduled an appointment with a pain specialist for Lidocaine nerve blocks. I would be having these weekly for three weeks to determine if there are any lasting results controlling my phantom/stump pain. I have researched this procedure as much as I care to at this point. I have been having second thoughts and have plenty of time to cancel if I see fit to do so.

My questions are:

What are your experiences good or bad with this procedure?

If you had this type of procedure, were any other injections used such as alcohol, etc.?

I have been through all the drugs such as, Lyrica, Rontin, Cymbalta, Lidocaine cream and patches............................................ nothing gave me much help.

Thanks in advance for any information you can pass my way.

Regards,

CKB

post-2495-127479456479_thumb.jpg

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Hi there, im sorry your not getting any pain relief. I have never had the injections you are talking about, however I am using patches right now, they dont seem to have any effect on my pain either, I have also gone through a range of drugs which have not really helped that much.

I would be interested in the injections you are refering to.

I hope something works for you, pain affects every part of your life. keith

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Hi Captain KB,

Sounds interesting. I would definitely be interested in hearing if this worked for you and gave you any relief. Best of luck with it.

I also tried the Lidocaine patches last summer for awhile, but they did absolutely nothing! Having it injected at the nerve might make a difference. I still do get phantom pain though nothing to the extent that I did for the first several months after my amputation last year. I was on a combination of Neurotin and narcotics. Right now I am down to taking a small dose (2mg a day) of Hydromorphone at night for phantoms. I was able to get off Neurotin two months ago. Getting my prothestic in Dec. seems to have helped desensitize my stump and brought a certain degree of relief.

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Love the cartoon, CKB. Yes, things could certainly be worse! :laugh:

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Hi am new here.....still just over 50 days post RBK surgery. I expect I still need another month or so to see how much mu stimp pain dissipates .....especially after I take delivery of the prosthetic and begin PT for gait training. I here that the prosthetic for most people desenstizes the stump and reduces pain significantly?

I am being casted next Friday and they offically ordered the parts they need for the leg a few days ago. I should get the leg a few days later.

If anyone has any information to offer please do so. I am a nearly 56 year old male in good health other than the leg gone. I suffered a major MC accident on Jan 2, 2009 which left me with a broken neck, badly broken/dislocated pelvis, slashed tendons (all of them) on my right wrist and a very nasty pilon fracture of the right ankle. The ankle turned into a two year battle ending with a fusion effort , consistent osteomyelitis (infection) and finally losing the limb on Nov 30th, 2010.

I am already trying the mirror therapy that originared or at least is done regularly at Walter Reed veterans hospital. I hope that works for me going forward and that I have little if any "phantom" pain down the road. At this point the stump itself is still just painful espeically in the late Afternoon and evening. I take gabapentin and have "been" on Percocet or vicodan since my accident. Needless to say I still take the percs as they do help knock down pain. I am addicted though and will have to wean off the junk later this year.

Thanks and Hi to all of you.

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Allow me to welcome you to the forum Clan. We are a diverse group of people from around the world who all share the common thread of amputation. I hope you visit often. There is a wealth of knowledge in the pages of this forum. Almost anything about being an amputee can be found here.

The phantoms are worse or seemed to be in the beginning. I had many sleepless nights in my early days as an amputee. The doc never prescribed anything for me except Lortab for general pain. For me, they diminished to almost nothing after I started using a prosthetic.

I get the occasional zingers that come from nowhere, but really get your attention. They typically come on fast, but leave equally as fast. They visit me more in the evenings while relaxed with the leg off, usually on a day when I was a little too active.

I don't know if anyone has explained the difference to you of phantom pain vs phantom sensation, so here goes my speech. Phantom pain is never really a good thing. At the very least it can be really annoying. At the worst, it is debilitating. Phantom sensation is a welcome thing. Sensation is simply being able to feel that your foot is still there. You can wiggle you toes and move your ankle. Your brain doesn't know that your foot and ankle are missing so when you flex the muscles to do certain things, the brain still registers a foot/ankle. This is the good part. Since your brain still registers a foot/ankle, when you begin using a prosthetic leg your brain will take over and make the transition seem almost normal. It might take a little time, but you will not have to worry about where your foot is in space.

Walking as a bk is not hard at all and it shouldn't hurt. Doing what you want to do and relearning how to do it is what takes some time and perserverance. Work on your balance first. When you can balance some only on your prosthesis is when you'll have a much more natural gait and be able to become more active. Balance and trust are truly the most important components to using a prosthetic leg. You need both in order not to have to think about every step you take.

I don't know what part of the country you're in, but ice and snow can be very tricky. We are unable to flatten out our foot as we extend it ahead of us. That on ice can result in a very quick meeting of the pavement. I tend to take short steps and try to keep the foot as flat as I can when walking on ice and snow. So far I haven't met the pavement. Deep snow is hard also as we can't point our foot. When you step into deep snow it can feel like an anchor coming out. Just something you need to figure out.

As spring comes on and you want to get out into the yard will open up a whole new challenge. Rough terrain. Walking in rough terrain is one of the hardest things to get used to. Something as small as a pebble or acorn can throw you backwards or forwards. Balance helps this. The better your balance, the more force you put in your stride. The more forceful the stride, the better you will glide right over those little challenges. Sloping ground or ramps. I still have some trouble on these. I will take stairs over ramps any day. Walking through the lawn though or down a slope can be tricky if you are having a bad leg day.

I hope this can help you in some way. Keep us updated on your progress.

Neal

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