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narooma99

help with new foot

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Hi every one its time for me to upgrade to a better foot i am using the trias from otto bock at the moment, and its still to stiff for me. My prothisest has given me a choice of four feet the variflex, and the ceterus from ossur the freedom renegade, and the colledge park true step.

If anyone has used these feet could you please give me some feedback on how good you thought they were particully how stiff they were if anyone has use the colledge park truestep could they tell me how expensive, and how often they needed to be serviced.thanks

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I've used the Renegade. It's a good foot. Not too stiff and very responsive.

I also have a Freedom Highlander which is similar to the Variflex. I love this foot. It is softer than the Renegade.

The Ceterus is too heavy for my liking.

I was steered away from the TruStep because of the maintenance.

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hi ya,

i have used a vari-flex for the last 7yrs and have just gone through an exorcise to find a 'better' foot and can't, its light, dynamic and because it has a good 'sole-arch' rather than a 'flat-plate' it has the smoothest roll-over of all the feet i have tried, my only problem was lack of torsion control, so i am having fitted a delta-twist unit to combat this. if you choose this foot make sure you have the one fitted with a male pyramid as this offers better adjustment for angle control.

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I have The Renegade MX foot. Its just at a year old. The rotator broke a couple of weeks ago.(still under warrenty) Next week the (new) loaner foot will get replaced with my repaired foot. I really like the foot with the rotator but it seems to be a weak leak for me. My prosthetics guy doesnt think it will keep up with my workload/playload. I am getting a complete new leg next week and will get to try out a perfect stride foot and a heavier rated renegade foot without the rotator.

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Hi

I have the college park trustep and I love it. My current Prosthetist doesn't like them much because of the maintenance but coupled with the harmony system it would take a very good eye to notice which leg I had amputated (unless I'm wearing shorts!)

I've had this foot for 7.5 years, in that time it's needed a new foot shell (old one split) and has had the bushes replaced twice (2nd time just recently) I've also managed to break the front part of the foot - there is a split appearing between the two "toes" so I'm waiting for this new part as well.

As for cost - I have no idea sorry - the accident compensation insurance pays for everything - I don't ever get to even see the bill

David

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hi ya,

i have used a vari-flex for the last 7yrs and have just gone through an exorcise to find a 'better' foot and can't, its light, dynamic and because it has a good 'sole-arch' rather than a 'flat-plate' it has the smoothest roll-over of all the feet i have tried, my only problem was lack of torsion control, so i am having fitted a delta-twist unit to combat this. if you choose this foot make sure you have the one fitted with a male pyramid as this offers better adjustment for angle control.

I am kind of fascinated with this thread ... because I am in the UK (NHS)... and I don't readily get offerred 'different' feet.... so am amazed at the choices people are getting .... as far as I know I am wearing standard single axis feet (am bilateral) ... though they work for me ... different surfaces etc. etc. ... I am happy with my set up at the moment and wonder what improvements I could get by trying different feet, years ago the feet I had were I think wooden and even with those had no problems. Did change over to a different pair some years back and found I was really stuck, slopes and stairs particularly difficult ... then had problems getting the feet changed back ... so now I am very wary of changing. I actually only got feet with 'toes' on about 18 months back and kind of like them, but have recently picked up a new pair and the feet once again have 'no toes' they are also very narrow .... the whole lot are going to be remade so not sure if its the sockets or the feet but am wondering if the narrowness of the feet are making it hard to balance.

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Thank you all for your responses i dont have insurance so i will have to pay most of the cost so i really want to get the right foot i have heard good things about the renergade and also the variflex its interesting the variflex is by far the cheapest foot what i really want is a foot that can bend so that the heel stays on the ground while the tibial shaft angles forward Neal can you tell me if the renergade is able to do this i think i have asked you a similar question before.

thanks all

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The Renegade is a great foot, but it is a little too stiff for that. The Highlander that I'm wearing at the moment does do that. It is a very comfortable foot. It is a little softer than my other two feet. That isn't a bad thing when you stand and walk all day. Many people have commented that it looks less artificial when I walk than my other feet. The Highlander is a Freedom Innovation foot.

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the vari-flex will do what you ask, the heel can be adjusted to various angles and if its fitted with a male pyramid that too will allow for further adjustment, as i have said i have used the vari-flex for 8yrs with no maintanance needed or faults, if you go to the ossur website, who supply the foot, you will find lots of information to allow for an informed choice. it would be wrong for one to assume that because its not as expensive as some, its in some way lacking.

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Please note which ever foot you choose be careful to get the right stiffness, it can make a big difference.

also remember that higher priced products are not always the best. the US market is set for the insurance payout levels. where as the European is more competitive priced.

please be aware that I am not an amputee, and have to work from patient feedback, but i'm sure Gasa will back me that my advice is neutral and He is right abut the Vari-flex

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Hi every one its time for me to upgrade to a better foot i am using the trias from otto bock at the moment, and its still to stiff for me. My prothisest has given me a choice of four feet the variflex, and the ceterus from ossur the freedom renegade, and the colledge park true step.

If anyone has used these feet could you please give me some feedback on how good you thought they were particully how stiff they were if anyone has use the colledge park truestep could they tell me how expensive, and how often they needed to be serviced.thanks

I am using an Otto Bock Trias+ foot too with my new C-leg. They fitted me with an Otto Bock Axtion foot but it made a clicking sound on heel strike. They replaced it with the Trias + and I walk really well now for an AK. I have to use an Otto Bock foot with the C-leg so I do not have many choices.

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I have an Echelon, which articulates forward and back (controlled by micro-hydraulics), and somewhat to the sides. There are several video clips on this link from the manufacturer.

http://www.endolite.co.uk/Echelon_Foot/ech_exp.html

The foot is widely available in the US (as long as your insurance company will pay for it). We CAN get it in the UK on our health service, but as it's 7 or 8 times the price of a 'standard' foot, not that often.

I believe that Ossur do a similar foot, but I don't know the name.

Anyway, I'd certainly recommend the Echelon, but with the usual caveat that if your SOCKET ain't right, then however fancy a foot you stick on the end of your leg, your problems won't go away...

Allen.

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The foot is widely available in the US (as long as your insurance company will pay for it). We CAN get it in the UK on our health service, but as it's 7 or 8 times the price of a 'standard' foot, not that often.

Really !!! don't get me wrong there are a few patients I would like to have on the Echelon, but as far as I am aware it is outside my prescription guides for the NHS.

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Not so sure about the 'widely', but at Stanmore (Blatchfords/NHS) several other patients have Echelons, and the prosthetic staff there are actively trying to push the NHS consultants to approve it whenever they can.

Not sure where you are, Tim, or which partnership you work for, but like most other expensive items, I would have thought that if there is a clinical need for them, a good case can be made for supplying them.

Allen.

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Thank you for your feed back guys i am getting the variflex fitted on Monday. There was a guy in the fitting rooms while i was talking to the prosthetist who had a new variflex fitted, and he was very pleased he started doing karate kicks with it he was so happy, any way because i dont have insurance its difficult to get feet to trial or so i am told. So any way if the variflex ticks all the right boxes i will probably get one even though i would like to try other feet.

One thing that concerns me, is they are telling me they cannot get a shock pylon on it because there is not enough room this is true for the standard versions, even though i know that you can get shorter versions of shock absorbing pylons that would easily fit me, why they keep telling me these things that are not quite true, well i kind of know why, but i wont go into it.

Any way the prosthetist said, and i believe there is some truth in this, that because the variflex is quite flexible the motion of the foot as it rolls over the ground will provide some degree of shock absorption,does anyone out there know something about this how necessary are shock pylons when you have a flexible foot? and are shock pylons commonly coupled with flexible feet?

Thanks for help guys i will keep you updated

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thanks allen for the info about the echelons they sound like good feet but they might be a littls to expensive for me to consider

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hi guys i have been using the variflex for a week now and i have to say its to soft i know i complained about the trias because it was to stiff my foot rools over so quickly its hard to take a long step and its prtty hard on my stump any way the prothesist is getting a stiffer version of the variflex for me to try

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if its too soft then you have been given the wrong set up for your weight, not the foots fault just wrong calculations, correct fit, set up, and alignment, as always is king

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if its too soft then you have been given the wrong set up for your weight, not the foots fault just wrong calculations, correct fit, set up, and alignment, as always is king

Ditto Gaza, stiffness set to your weight/activity alignment as per manufactures guidelines to allow to foot to roll over as designed.

hope you get it sorted

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i have the stiffer version of the variflex on now and i am fairing much better its taken nearly a year but i can say at least this foot functions some what like a normal foot should the price is pretty good to just wonder if other more expensive feet are much better i would love to try as many as i could if they were only a little better they probably would not be worth the extra cost however a significant improvement would be invaluble to me. thanks for the help guys

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just wonder if other more expensive feet are much better

Good Question, the answer is not always some feet are priced according to their market or to match insurance group brackets.

A lot of feet are variations of the same theme, the echelon appears to be the only real recent step forward (excuse pun).

But remember it is about having the right foot for purpose. What is right for someone else may be wrong for you. some high energy returns are not so hot at cutting actions of some sports and can also become tiresome for day to day use.

As ever alignment is key (Hi back Gaza) correct weight line over foot can make a bid difference

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A lot of feet are variations of the same theme, the echelon appears to be the only real recent step forward (excuse pun).

I am very interested in the many different types of prosthetic feet can you tell me a little more about this echelon foot

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After having trilled the truestep for a while i have decided to order one i did like new version of the variflex its very clever how they get it to do so much of the work for you it requires very little effort to walk and its good around the house but it rolled over a little to quickly for me there are times when i wanted to walk quickly with long steps and i had to fight it to stop the heel from coming off the ground to quickly.

The truestep has a good range of ankle motion and a fairly stiff forefoot so i can push off against it its not perfect but it does what i want

thank you all for your help.

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