Jump to content
Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Mary Farquhar

Just wondering?

Recommended Posts

Not me...of course, I did work as a secretary, so my job was only occasionally physically demanding. But at any rate, my employer was generally very good about supporting me as I went through the process of healing and getting my life back together. I did have some minor conflicts with a couple of co-workers who believed that I was "getting special treatment because she's a cripple," but I guess that's to be expected..........(sigh......)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me as I was still at school when it happened I chose a career that would be manageable at the beginning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did, I went to college and took up a more technical role and got better qualifications than I would have had if it were not for the amputation. So it paid off for me to some extent!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My accident happened recently and I have to say that I got a lot of support from all my employer - allowing me to miss several weeks of work - and coworkers - covering for me - and then going only for short periods of time during the day while I got therapy and a new leg. I am back to work full time but occasionally have to leave for prosthetic adjustments; I can't thank them enough for all their support, i've been very lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mary, I work for an unbelievably lenient, understanding and supportive company. From the President, to my peers, and even my subordinates have all been extremely supportive.

I'm still out on leave due to my ERTL revision and just yesterday my boss called once again just to see how I was doing. When my accident first happened the President flew from California to visit me in the hospital, as did many of my peers.

So to answer your question, no, I have not had to change positions within my company to compensate for my situation. I drive to shorter commutes rather than fly simply due to the airport hassles and possible delays (Milwaukee to Minneapolis). I fly to the west and east coasts quite a bit and avoid big airports (O'Hare) when ever possible.

I have nineteen years under my belt with my current employer and have no plans on leaving. If I did do something else I have often caught myself day dreaming about being a national account sales manager for a prosthetic company. I have spent hundreds of hours researching prosthetic devices and would enjoy working in that arena.

Interesting and thought provoking post by the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every doctor, friend, employer, counsellor, family member and prosthetist told me to change my career.

My job was incredibly physical this year alone I've taken around 50 flights, I regularly have to wear my leg for over 20 hours, I'm standing all day long, I have to do lots of heavy lifting and my working environment is on uneven ground and on many different levels requiring the use of lots of ladders and ramps. A normal person would be crazy to do my job let alone someone who is missing a leg.

I ignored everybody and I'm still doing the job I love in fact I'm probably working harder now than I ever have.

If there's something you want to do, go do it. What's the worst that could happen??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every doctor, friend, employer, counsellor, family member and prosthetist told me to change my career.

My job was incredibly physical this year alone I've taken around 50 flights, I regularly have to wear my leg for over 20 hours, I'm standing all day long, I have to do lots of heavy lifting and my working environment is on uneven ground and on many different levels requiring the use of lots of ladders and ramps. A normal person would be crazy to do my job let alone someone who is missing a leg.

I ignored everybody and I'm still doing the job I love in fact I'm probably working harder now than I ever have.

If there's something you want to do, go do it. What's the worst that could happen??

Wow, I think I found my twin. I am still waiting for my amp but it will be an left disartic (which I look at as a really long AK since all the hardware is the same), even close in age.... I'm a year older. I'm also just as crazy as you, my job is with the phone company working outside on uneven ground, down in manholes, up on telephone poles, and lots of ladders. I have people telling me that they don't see how I'll be able to go back to work and I keep telling them that if amps can ski and snowboard then climbing a ladder should be no problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all replies....nice to know that all employers were very understanding, and caring about your amputation.

I ask this question only because I question my ability to continue working with children. As some of you know I have been off work for 4 years now. I have been away from being an educator at a daycare which I loved although it was very stressful at times, but rewarding too. I ask myself if I want to continue working with kids because of my foot pain, even if I have a bka I still question myself. Maybe it will be too difficult, too physical still? I have in mind maybe to do the dental assisting program which is only 6-7 months. At least this way I am sitting and standing.

Oh, I got my new prosthetic today. I already know I will have to go back for adjustments but just need to know if that pain I have is still going to be there.

Mary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience from when I was sick, thru surgery and recovery has been very much like CaptainKB's. I could not ask for more support from my executive office down to everyone I work with. I am also lucky when I do travel to my prosthetists office that I can work from there due to the wonderful capabilities of BlackBerry's and laptops. I know how lucky I am to work for such a wonderful corporation.

I have been around amputees who do every line of work, and it seems that everyone does what they need to do to get thru life and enjoy it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to pack it in after my amputation. I was a drama teacher and that involved being on my feet pretty much all day and sitting on the floor of drama studios. The first was very painful and uncomfortable at the time. The second was ungainly, difficult ugly and laughter provoking! The trouble is I’m an old, unfit and fat amp! I know, I know, I should be leaner and fitter, but there you are. And do you know what? I don’t miss it a bit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It`s nice to know that a lot of you have stayed with the same job and didn`t have to change careers. For me I am a little worried if I have the bka that working with kids will be too much, walking and standing most of my days. I am thinking doing a job that I can sit and stand will be good. Just so use to working with kids. I have been away from my daycare job for 4 years, I am kinda interested in trying something new! Time will tell.

Mary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×