Jump to content
Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Hema2010

Postural problems

Recommended Posts

Hi,

It's me again, I've started going to work, and since I have a sedentary job which involves sitting for most of the time with the leg on, I'm finding that my posture is not quite right. The side with my prosthetic leg is raised and it finally translates into a back that's curved to the left side (since I'm a LAK). After sitting for extended hours (4+ hrs) with small breaks in between, I finally get a sore back. Has anyone else faced a similar issue? I'm thinking of getting around the problem by keeping something else under my right butt so that I'm sitting evenly on both the sides. and so that my back is not curved to one side. As of now I don't have an option of removing my leg and sitting, and putting it back on when I need to, so that's ruled out.

Is this a problem with my socket design, I wonder if my socket is way too high, I once asked my leg guy this and he told me that since I have grafted skin at the end of the stump, I will have to have a socket that comes higher up, so that there's more space for weight distribution.

thanks

Hema

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds like he thought you meant the hieght of your socket trim lines on your stump. Its really important that your legs are the same height or else you will end up with a curved spine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a/k Hema, but have had trouble with posture and backache though myself have been wearing limbs for many years. Depending on the height of seat and depth of the seat you are sitting on there is often a problem of having one leg slightly higher than the other .... I am bilateral b/k but on the side I wear a liner find I have the same problem,because the natural limb is slightly elevated by the prosthesis, and the trouble is you often find yourself having to lean forward or sit on the edge of the chair to put both feet on the ground.

Some of the things I do, apart from adjusting height and depth of seat if I can, try and get as much lumbar support as possible and to use a foot rest.

If its not just sitting that is a problem, make sure that the prosthesis is the right length .... sometimes you can start off with it being the correct length but once you have been wearing it for a while may have gone deeper in which will make it longer. So check that out also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with everything said about leg length, but also feel that sitting often causes me more problems than being upright! You need to get the leg length and the socket trim height looked at. Check out the MAS socket, (google it) which may mean your buttock is on the chair rather than your hard socket.

Not everyone is suitable for this design of socket but worth asking your leg people about it.

The problem with ak is that the hard socket holds you off the chair, meaning that your other side is lower, resulting in pressure on your lower back. This is often worse when sitting on a hard seat or a seat with a wooden frame.

Have you considered asking your employer to provide you with a special ergonomic chair specifically for your needs?

Or using a cushion of some sort, you can get memory foam or wheelchair cushions that have adjustable air pockets in, may help in the short term with your comfort at work. This type of pain is quite common with aka but you have to make things as best you can for yourself as the Knicks on effects of pain are draining.

CUSHIONS

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hema,

Didn't explain myself very well, with the air pocket cushion you can alter the amount of air in each side. So you could leg the air down on your prosthetic Sid and put extra in under your other side, thus making you more level as well as giving some padding between you and the seat.

Hope that makes sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hema,

Didn't explain myself very well, with the air pocket cushion you can alter the amount of air in each side. So you could leg the air down on your prosthetic Sid and put extra in under your other side, thus making you more level as well as giving some padding between you and the seat.

Hope that makes sense.

Dear Lynne,

Thanks a lot for your response, I have been thinking about getting air cushions too, looks like it would help. :) Sorry for the late response, I have been a little busy for a while so I just got to log in again today. Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hema,

When I used a solid AK socket I ran into the problem you have. For many years my AK socket is flexible on the top/front and bottom/back and allows the flesh to flatten so the socket is not being pushed up as high off the chair seat. Even the socket in the back at the seat is connected by a strap and not a hard frame.

Click the links. My leg has only a strap in the back where this one has a frame that connects it.

http://orthocareamerica.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/c-leg.11204600_std.jpg

http://www.nextmed.com/images/mmvr17/thewells-ph2.jpg

http://heathcalhoun.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/HangerProsthesis1.jpg

http://www.oandplibrary.org/popup.asp?frmItemId=458FD0F5-6808-4540-B2D9-582595282FCB&frmType=image&frmId=2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×