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eb2phkingood

Hip Hiking?? And NOT the leg you would expect!

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I am very active on my prosthesis and very little slows me down. However I have picked up a bad habit somewhere since day one, i hip hike. The crazy part is i hike my "good leg's" hip. It's almost as if i fall on the prosthesis side (left side) and my right side hip lifts up in the air. Im a pretty strong guy so I dont feel strength is the issue. Also, i know the quick answer is "well your prosthetic side is too short" however i have had the prosthetic side higher than my good leg side before and i still do it. A simple hip test even confirmed the prosthetic side was higher than the good leg side while standing still, yet i still hiked the hip on the good leg. So we lowered the pylon back to where both hips are even standing and I still hip hike on the good leg side. I have kicked the leg outwards, inwards, ect. Any ideas? Thoughts?

Thanks!

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Hello,

I'm a fairly new amputee/prosthesis wearer so not a lot of experience but what I can share is that as I started to walk on my new leg I also started hip hiking on the other side so my physical therapist gave me a lot of exercises to strengthen my butt, particularly on the amp side; mainly tightening and relaxing the muscles over and over and also "stepping on my toes" and that gradually helped. I also noticed that along with the hip went my shoulders leaning to the same side so I made a conscious effort throughout the day to keep my shoulders straight and I believe that also helped...

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I don't think I've ever had your specific problem. I started walking with a very stiff gait. It was like I was afraid to bend the hip on the prosthetic side. My prosthetist told me to walk more like a lady. I thought he was nuts, but I started walking with a little swing to the hips and sure enough, my gait improved dramatically.

Physical therapy does sound like the proper route to take since you've already checked on everything prosthetic.

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Wonder if it has anything to do with you being knee disartic and your knee being off centre....just a thought.

Also agree with what was said about using your pelvis more. A good exercise is to wrap a dyna band around your pelvis and get someone to hold the ends they walk behind you. The idea is that they pull on each side as you step into the resistance of the tightened band. Think an exaggerated model down cat walk....kinda walk. Not the high heels just the pelvis swing.

Hope this helps.

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Hello,

I'm a fairly new amputee/prosthesis wearer so not a lot of experience but what I can share is that as I started to walk on my new leg I also started hip hiking on the other side so my physical therapist gave me a lot of exercises to strengthen my butt, particularly on the amp side; mainly tightening and relaxing the muscles over and over and also "stepping on my toes" and that gradually helped. I also noticed that along with the hip went my shoulders leaning to the same side so I made a conscious effort throughout the day to keep my shoulders straight and I believe that also helped...

awesome, thanks so much for the response. However, i am not sure what you mean by the stepping on your toes part, could you elaborate some? thanks!

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Hello,

I'm a fairly new amputee/prosthesis wearer so not a lot of experience but what I can share is that as I started to walk on my new leg I also started hip hiking on the other side so my physical therapist gave me a lot of exercises to strengthen my butt, particularly on the amp side; mainly tightening and relaxing the muscles over and over and also "stepping on my toes" and that gradually helped. I also noticed that along with the hip went my shoulders leaning to the same side so I made a conscious effort throughout the day to keep my shoulders straight and I believe that also helped...

awesome, thanks so much for the response. However, i am not sure what you mean by the stepping on your toes part, could you elaborate some? thanks!

In order to stand on your toes with your sound leg you have to tighten some muscles so when doing it with both legs - while holding the edge of a table for example - you re-teach your amp side to use those same muscles; or so I understood from my therapist ...

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After I got my first leg, I had a problem with rolling my hip, for about 2 years... However, I was literally broken in half and for me it was just post accident fallout.. It did straighten out with time, and a little work on it. I usually just concentrated on following through with my foot as directly under me as I could get it, and not out in any way....Sorry that I don't have any better ideas or hints to help you out...Do you have a problem somewhere on your "sound" side?

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After I got my first leg, I had a problem with rolling my hip, for about 2 years... However, I was literally broken in half and for me it was just post accident fallout.. It did straighten out with time, and a little work on it. I usually just concentrated on following through with my foot as directly under me as I could get it, and not out in any way....Sorry that I don't have any better ideas or hints to help you out...Do you have a problem somewhere on your "sound" side?

compound fracture + skin graph on my tibia, tore my achilles, tore my plantar fascia, had toe tendon lengthening surgery, 3 knee surgeries (no ACL, MCL, LCL, PCL in my knee anymore, just rely on scar tissue for support and a wicked ossur CTI knee brace), fibia is still broken into 2 pieces and just sitting in the leg (it never grew back together), broke femur in 3 places, rods in tib/femur, plate in knee/ankle, pins in hip. all of that is JUST on my "good (sound) leg"

whoops :)

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I think when you first start walking on your prosthesis, or at least until you are fully taking all the weight on that side, it takes its toll on your sound side. I am bilateral, so the only thing I can compare it with is after I had a revision on one side a few back, when I started walking again, I had more problems with the other side than the other one which had just had the surgery. It did sort itself out, but took a few months and quite a bit of physio.

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