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cherylm

Swimming Amps....

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Here's a discussion that popped up on the "introduction"thread, but it's worth a thread of its own............

View Post Scotskate, on 23 March 2011 - 11:50 AM, said:

Hello everybody, I finally joined this site -it really is great! I live in London, was born in Glasgow Scotland and married a 'Cockney Geezer' almost 40 years ago. I hope to chat to lot's of people on here and get and hopepfully give, support and tips to make life easier. I have one question already! - I am going on holiday this year and wondered how a left bka gets out of the swimming pool? I can launch myself in to the pool but getting out can be a problem - any ideas? Maybe this part of the thread should go to a different site? but any quick answers would help.

I now feel part of a very exclusive club!

scotskate

Response from Ali Hall:

Hi and welcome :) I am an RBK for 12 years and the best way I have found is to go to the ladder at the side, grab with both hands up high, put good leg on bottom step, pull up and then push my stump onto the next step (just below the knee where the bar in the socket pushes onto the edge of the step) and use that to move the good leg up higher. Works well for me anyway.

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I'm also a left BK...getting into a pool is no problem at all...swimming is wonderful (once you figure out how not to swim in circles!)...but I've always had a problem getting out of the pool. (Heck, I had problems getting out of a pool with two legs, so you can imagine my results with one.)

I know a good number of amputees of many types and levels who have no problem at all heaving themselves out of a swimming pool...it just takes a good awareness of where your strengths and weaknesses are. Ali's suggestion sounds really good if you're proficient at climbing ladders.

I've basically admitted that I do best with a water activity prosthesis, which I absolutely LOVE...but before the swim leg came into my life, I boosted myself out of the pool by going up the pool stairs on the seat of my pants! This is a skill I became very, very good at during three years of assorted foot problems and surgeries. (I was basically non-weight-bearing, lived in a second floor apartment, and have always been lousy at using crutches...going up and down stairs on my rear end became second nature to me. :rolleyes: )

My system was to put a chair near the side of the pool, close to the stairs, and then hoist myself up the stairs on my rear end; once I was sitting on the edge of the pool, I'd pull the chair over and hoist myself up into that. Then I could sit, let my stump dry off, and put on my prosthesis. Took some time and effort, but it worked well! (Swim leg works better, though!)

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I'm also a left BK...getting into a pool is no problem at all...swimming is wonderful (once you figure out how not to swim in circles!)...but I've always had a problem getting out of the pool. (Heck, I had problems getting out of a pool with two legs, so you can imagine my results with one.)

I know a good number of amputees of many types and levels who have no problem at all heaving themselves out of a swimming pool...it just takes a good awareness of where your strengths and weaknesses are. Ali's suggestion sounds really good if you're proficient at climbing ladders.

I've basically admitted that I do best with a water activity prosthesis, which I absolutely LOVE...but before the swim leg came into my life, I boosted myself out of the pool by going up the pool stairs on the seat of my pants! This is a skill I became very, very good at during three years of assorted foot problems and surgeries. (I was basically non-weight-bearing, lived in a second floor apartment, and have always been lousy at using crutches...going up and down stairs on my rear end became second mature to me. :rolleyes: )

My system was to put a chair near the side of the pool, close to the stairs, and then hoist myself up the stairs on my rear end; once I was sitting on the edge of the pool, I'd pull the chair over and hoist myself up into that. Then I could sit, let my stump dry off, and put on my prosthesis. Took some time and effort, but it worked well! (Swim leg works better, though!)

I work it the same way as you Cheryl. It's either crawl from point a to point b, or preferably have a transfer chair close to a ladder.

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I find it much easier now that I use an old leg as a swim leg. You just climb out the ladder as if you had two legs.

When swimming without the leg I would use my stump on a step, then my leg, then the stump, etc. Worked OK. I would either have my crutches handy or hop a short way to a chair.

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I find it much easier now that I use an old leg as a swim leg. You just climb out the ladder as if you had two legs.

When swimming without the leg I would use my stump on a step, then my leg, then the stump, etc. Worked OK. I would either have my crutches handy or hop a short way to a chair.

Yep.... Neal said it.. That is the way that I do it too.. However, I do have a Trowbridge Terra-round peg that I use instead of an older foot. I like the peg, climb up and down the ladders just like I did with two legs. Plus, once out of the water, the Terra-round can be used as a foot. I have used it all over..An aquaintance of mine wears only the peg foot and he is a martial arts instructor and construction worker....

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Hi Everyone,

This is a great thread. I love to swim and I have been an avid swimmer my entire life. I swam competitively in high school and have been swimming laps for exercise for years now. I just got back into swimming again last September for the first time after my amputation. I found that there really wasn't much difference than when I had my leg, which had been useless and unusable for many years prior to my amputation anyway. I don't wear any water leg prosthetic being a hip-disartic. I get to the pool edge with my crutches and leave them against the wall. Then I use the ladder to climb down backwards into the water. I have very strong upper body strength due to the 15 years I spent on crutches full time before my amputation. I just use the ladder hand rails to help lower and hoist myself out of the water mostly with my upper body. I just always have to be cautious walking with my crutches on the wet pool deck.

-Chrissy

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Hi all,

Are waterlegs any good? Never had one! I am RAK. Anyone experienced in using one?

Ellen.

Just received my Water Leg two days ago, will not have the chance till summer to use it in a pool. Have been using it around the house, its only 7lbs total which is very nice. My reg. leg is a Rheo knee and about 16 lbs, so quite a difference. Will keep you posted as it goes.

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3/27/2011

Hi Everyone,

I am also very interested what all the described water legs look like. Any pictures would be greatly appreciated.

I was able to do a bit of swimming post right knee dis. but was sidelined by a visit to yet another ortho. doc visit to fix a torn rotator cuff acquired while relearning to walk again. I'm hoping to be back in water soon but with short term unorthodox arm movements for a while.

Thanks,

Jane

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I had a water leg (before my sports leg - the NHS wouldn't let me have three), and whilst it was great for the beach, for paddling with the children or for taking them swimming when I was just standing around helping them and for water parks when on holiday I found it useless for actual serious swimming. I don't know if that was because I had swum for many years without a water leg so was used to doing it that way but it seemed to hinder me more than help but it was great for getting to and from the changing rooms.

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Like Neal, I use an old leg. And like you, I don't find it useful in the water. It's great for getting from A to B or walking on the beach, tho.

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Like Neal and Marcia,I used one of first legs as swim leg to begin with. It worked, but as we all know, it was really only a means to be able to move from A to B and to stand, which, being an older one with an older socket at the time, was very uncomfortable. For me,with all of the injuries I had sustained, I had to be a bit more "correct" or I was in a world of hurt. I have found that with the "peg" that I can move much more freely, swim sufficiently and really haven't found any problems with it. I'm not locked into only wearing it in the water either. I take it with me when I go see my CPO because I have to have another one to put on while he is modifying, fixing, adjusting the one I currently wear daily or I will swell quite a bit. I have worn it around the farm as well.

I have spoke with the creator's son, of the Trowbridge Terra-round foot and it was originally made so that it could be worn by the inventor for golfing and working with cattle..

I think the main thing is, sometimes, it's not so much what you use, but what you desire to do.

They also have feet that have a "release" in the ankle area that can sort of "extend" backward so that a flipper can be worn on the foot. I know that explaination isn't quite so professional or scientific, but I have only saw those feet in a magazine, and can't remember the name of it.

We are all a fairly creative bunch of people when it comes to resuming what we wish to in our lives. We do what we can, be it cost, accessibility, ingenuity. We try to do what is doable for each of us. What works for one or another, may not work for everyone.

I hope this works out well for you.....

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3/27/2011

Hi Everyone,

I am also very interested what all the described water legs look like. Any pictures would be greatly appreciated.

I was able to do a bit of swimming post right knee dis. but was sidelined by a visit to yet another ortho. doc visit to fix a torn rotator cuff acquired while relearning to walk again. I'm hoping to be back in water soon but with short term unorthodox arm movements for a while.

Thanks,

Jane

Still getting use to it, it's very simple, but another nice thing is, it comes apart very easy, can be packed as a carry on.

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post-2613-0-25020900-1301611282_thumb.jp

post-2613-0-74226600-1301611296_thumb.jp

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