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Daviddup

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Hi my name is David

I am an above the knee amputee. On the 26 May 11 I underwent a knee replacement operation, my body rejected the knee that left me with a dealy infection. As a result my leg was amputated.

i am in shock as i went for a routine operation and came home today with my leg being amputated. It is as everytime I see my stump i get a shock, don't know why I did it but stopped at the mirror this morning and had a look at me.

looking forward to learn a lot from all of you.

cheers.

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Hi, David, and welcome to our little club. Sorry to hear about your situation, but there are some good AK folks here who can help you get life sorted back out.

I think that taking a good look at yourself in the mirror can be a healthy thing...it gives you a chance to adjust to the "new" you. I used mirrors all through my rehab...some days that was a big help, and one day it "got to me" and I sat and cried for a bit. The "good" days far outweighed the one "bad" day...if I could see myself standing upright, even if it was in between the parallel bars or on my walker, it was proof that I was making progress.

All the best to you in your own recovery...don't be afraid to ask questions or just "vent" when you need to. We're all here because we want to make it easier for other amps to put their lives back together! :smile:

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Hi David,

Sounds sudden and it's all very new. Take it from me, I'm an above knee amputee, being an amputee isn't all that bad, there are good things that come of it. New avenues will open up to you in terms of support and encouragement for sport for example, and progression in areas of your life you may never of even thought of. You can become a big fish in a small pond. You now have something about you that is probably unique among those you know. This is a good thing in many ways. You will come to realise that you are who you are, you just don't have that leg anymore, simple as that and nothing more.

Time will sort your mind and it can be quicker than you think.

You'll be up and about and participating in life as you were before you know it... it seems a way off yet, but be patient, it'll happen soon enough.

Good luck in everything and don't hesitate to ask anything, there are a lot of good people here.

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Hi David and welcome to our forum. I'm sorry we have to meet this way.

I, too, was stunned when I saw myself in a mirror. Equally so when I saw my first shadow as an amputee. This is it!!! That's the attitude I took from day one. It has served me well.

I'm only a BK amp so I can't help you much with what your new life will be. I can tell you that life is far from over. I just came home from the national conference for the Amputee Coalition. I witnessed amputees of all levels achieving awesome things.

Get a good prosthetist that you like a lot. You almost need to love this person as they will be a very important part of your life. Don't worry too much about the best hardware right now. You will be going through a lot of changes and will most likely need an equipment change within months of your first leg. Use some of your recouping time to educate yourself on life as an amputee. You've already started that by finding us.

I'm sure a good AK will come along and add to what Cheryl and I have told you.

Good luck

Neal

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Hi

Welcome to the forum, I am kind of echoing what Neal said about your life being far from over now you are an amputee, it probably doesn't seem like it now, but you will adjust and achieve much more than you imagine.

I take on board what's been said about mirror's and 'adjustment', but I would say give yourself a bit of space at the moment, the adjustment will come in time, as most ladies will tell you from experiences in store changing rooms, mirrors are not always particularly flattering and on a bad day ... a bit of a downer. When I had my amputations I was quite young and mirrors were kept away from me initially due to facial injuries, so don't really remember the first time I looked in a mirror, but do remember the first time I saw myself walking on video camera which kind of surprised me, and that was many years down the line, so give yourself a bit of TLC at the moment, and concentrate on keeping happy.

I am also below knee myself but do know many a/k's who manage very well, and live very normal lives, so although its all very alien to you at the moment, things will get easier.

Ann

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Hi David,

welcome to this great forum. I have learned so much from the people here. Neal is so right that life is not over once we have have an amputation, butnit takes time to experience that life can be good again. If I were not an amputee I would have missed meeting some truly amazing people. Each year when I have attended the Amputee Coalition I have come home feeling inspired and I can challenge myself to do more.

Peace, Beth Marie

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Hello David,

I can only echo everyone's comments that this is a great forum, as a fairly new amputee I come here often when I have some doubts and so far I have not been disappointed on all the support and resources. I'm also with Neal and one of the most helpful persons in the last year has been my prosthetist, I believe that a lot of my progress has to do with his advice and his willingness to listen and try something untilnwe get it right.

Take cate,

Javier

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Hi my name is David

I am an above the knee amputee. On the 26 May 11 I underwent a knee replacement operation, my body rejected the knee that left me with a dealy infection. As a result my leg was amputated.

i am in shock as i went for a routine operation and came home today with my leg being amputated. It is as everytime I see my stump i get a shock, don't know why I did it but stopped at the mirror this morning and had a look at me.

looking forward to learn a lot from all of you.

cheers.

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Hello David and welcome. This is a very helpful site and I know you will get lots of helpful advice and support - always remember you are not on your own - we will help if we can. I hope you start to feel more positive about life as I too went n for an operation just over 2 years ago and came out minus my lower left limb. I thought I was having a toe or at most, a part of my foot removed, but I caught blood poisoning and the lower leg had to come off. The shock was very difficult to live with for a long time, but we all learn to get on with it and try and cope as best we can. I am no 'spring chicken' and I have to contend with lots of small niggles that comes with maturing (I hate the words old age!) but it does get easier.. Keep your chin - and your spirits - up mate! I wish you luck.

Scotskate

You are allowed to say you can't

You are not allowed to say you won't

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Hello David,

I am sorry for your loss, but I am happy you are still with us. :biggrin:

Long story short, no pun intended; Lost both my legs above the knees while working for the railroad in 2003. Went back to work for the railroad in 2005 and am still with them. I have a new hobby of offroading. I built up my Jeep with some help. I tried for 2 years to walk with c-legs, but determined it wasn't for me. I am still using a manual chair to help stay in "shape", (hopefully not round).

And Life goes on.

You will be surprised when you do get fitted and start your therapy. It will take work, and most important a GOOD ATTITUDE, but you will walk again.

May the Good Lord help you, your family and friends to all help each other through this. I know He saved me and now I try to help others to see that life does not end or even slow down just because of a "bump in the road of life".

2 more factors to remember: This isn't for eternity and there are so many more people out there with more serious problems than what I have.

Adjust, improvise and overcome. Keep the Faith.

Vince

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Hi David,

Welcome. I'm glad you found this site. It is filled with so my great people who can offer their knowledge, experience and support.

I am a right leg AK. My amp is also called a through knee amputation or a disarticulation amputation as I have a intact femur. Your note didn't elaborate at what point on your leg was your amputation.

I can offer two valuable pointers given to me. First - Set your goals long term. Think about what you hope to do 6 months out, 9 months, a year. Second - Once you get your new leg really, really, only think about one step at a time. Avoid multi-tasking. This probably sounds overly simple but it is really important to keep you safe while learning to walk again. I definitely leaned this the hard way and hope you don't do the same.

Hang in there!

Jane

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