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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
jberna

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Hi, Candice, and welcome to our little forum "family." There are a number of us here who can identify with your situation...me being among them! I started my journey into the amputee world when I broke an obscure bone in my left foot (the tarsal navicular, to be exact) and ended up suffering through repeated attempts to repair the fracture until finally I developed MRSA and wound up losing my leg below the knee.

If it's any reassurance to you, losing the leg turned out to be a good move for me: no more infection, no more waiting for the latest repair on the tarsal navicular to fail, and much, much less pain than I'd been experiencing for the year preceeding my amputation. The amputation is what let me get back to living a normal life! While I sincerely hope that your debridement and reconstruction will be fully successful, please know that we're all here, ready and willing to offer up any support you may need to adjust to whatever situation you might find yourself facing. :wink:

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Welcome - I hope your op is successeful but if not as you will have read on here amputation is not the end of the world. Mine was an elective procedure (due to deformity) and it was the best thing I could have done. I also have two teenage daughters so I sympathise with you on that one!

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Hello everyone! - I've just spent hours reading all your 'amp' stories so here goes.....

I am a young thiking 68 year old (am I the Forum's Granny?).who originates from Scotland but now liives in the middle of London. I had vascular disease which culminated in a left BK amputation in February 2009. I went into hospital expecting to have some toes or maybe part of my foot removed and woke up 6 weeks later with the leg gone, below the knee. It seems I had gangrene going up to the heart and the leg had to go. I also had a bad reaction to the knock out gas and was in intensive care/coma for that length of time. Believe me, morphine and heavy drugs certainly kept me sedated but rhe nightmares I had during this time were something else! I don't know where they came from but I still recollect the terror and horror after 3 years and I wouldn't wish any of them on my worse enemy. I still can't talk about them. When I woke up from the coma and realised the leg had gone, I seemed to go into a place where I could not accept or believe what happened but slowly, with the support and love of my husband (40 years married) and family and friends, I cam to accept the situation.

Now for the good bit - with my prosthetic leg fitted I can now do lot's of things an 'old biddy' can cope with- shopping, going out to dinner, going on holiday, getting on and off a bus (I don't drive), etc. The only problem I have is my balance. I cannot go out without my dammed stick as I feel very unstable. No matter how much I try, I need this 'prop' to boost my confidence.

So folks, take it from me - you CAN DO IT - I don't pretend it's easy and at times I get very down but we all have to get on with life and you younger ones need to keep going.

If you are still awake after all this, feel feee to drop me an e-mail any time. I like to be in contact with my Forum friends.

Good luck to all of you.

Cathie

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Hi Candice,

Welcome to our great group. I have found so much support and encouragement in the early days Very briefly, in 2003 a woman who was not looking where she was going hit the car I was driving and I ended up with two broken ankles and other injuries. My left leg healed, my right did not. After 3 years in a wheelchair having many different surgeries I finally told the doc to "take it off." After his protests, he an amputation and I have never looked back. I am a very active "senior" who has just finished a year renovation progect coming oh so close to finishing the first floor--it was a major disaster--and almost ready to start the other floor, which basically only needs painting.

I hope your recovery goes well and you stay connected with the great folks here.

Beth Marie

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No, afraid you're not the oldest G'ma on the forum..and I really don't know if I am., haven't looked. As far as being young in spirit, that I am. Like u I love most anything Italian also. {very fattening} Hate to meet u this way, but hey, we all make it and also discover some good friends. Welcome to r group.

ann

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Hi, Cathie, and welcome to the "family!" I'm not really sure who our oldest "grand" is either, but we really do have a w-i-i-i-i-d-e age range here. We can always use someone who's young at heart with a positive attitude, so you'll fit right in!

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Hi Cathie,

Welcome to a great group of people. I REALLY admire your "can do" attitude. It is just such an attitude that has given me back my life. I am 66 and have just about finished renovations on my house. I have been at it for 1year and have about 3 more months to go.

Peace, Beth Marie

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Hi Cathie,

Welcome to the group. Have you tried using a ski pole rather than a cane? It can offer some balance - and piece of mind - but doesn't seem quite so cumbersome. A hikers type pole can also be adjustable which is helpful on varying terrain. I keep mine by the front door when I'm heading outside into the yard or woods out back. I've also spent a lot of time in a doorway trying to balance on one foot. Mind you I never really tried this when I had both feet so maybe good balance never was my strength to begin with.

My short story how I found this group was from Judy B - the women who began this thread way back ago. Through a high school class mate of my sister I connected with Judy and heard how she was an elective below knee amputee. She had been born with a gimp foot, pain, inability to function as she wanted etc she opted to have an amputation. She saw the amputation not as an end but a chance for a new beginning. Back in the summer of 2010 I wanted a new beginning too.

In Sept 2004 I had an simple orthoscopic surgery on my right knee that went to hell. Complications not correctly treated caused infections, septic, pneumonia, etc. Thrown in the mix a April 2005 fall snapped my right knee petella tentdion. Patched but never the same my knee continued to deteriorate. My Dartmouth surgeon made it clear in Aug 2008 that a fused knee or an amputation were my options should another infection occur. Docs at Mass General concurred. In October 2008 I went to Dartmouth for an Friday office visit and didn't leave. Surgery #6 was done to rid more infection. Going in I begged my Doc to save my leg. His words from the August appointment hung over me. He did what he could and I woke up with ten toes. The next two years were spent using crutches, a wheel chair and using the lovely drop hindge brace locked out straight full time. I was functioning, grateful I had a job I could do, but not really living. Living with the leg locked out gave me a real taste of what a fused leg would be like. Frustration, on going and increasing pain I hit my wall in July 2010. I wanted more or at least a chance for more. I was then 49 and I wanted the next half of my life to be great. My through knee amp was done in Aug 2010 and while there have been a few bumps along the way I am living again.

None of us always get to always choose what happens in life but this group sure shows what a good attitude can do to help along the way.

Jane

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How amazing is this forum that, almost ten years ago I started this thread because I loved hearing other amputee's stories, and it's still here, almost a decade later? I just had to pop back in and say I'm no longer in Utah... have since lived in NY for five years, and now reside in Colorado. But I'm still an amputee (it didn't grow back!) and I'm thrilled that this thread is still going strong...30K posts later.

Cheers to all the amputees out there, reaching out to help each other...for decades!

Judy Berna

(jberna, or judyb back in the day)

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Glad you stopped back in....Those of us who have been amps a while have to remember that there are always newbies coming along.. If someone hadn't of been there for us, where would we have been? I hope to pass on what ever I can to other's as I had things passed on to me.....

I hope all of the members remember that, and appreciate it as well.....

It's always nice to catch up anyway!.

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Hi, my nickname on here is StandingTall. I am a 56 yr old female with lower body Cerebral Palsy from birth. Since 8 May this year, I have also become an AKA on my left leg due to circulation problems. At present I am a wheelchair user, but would love to be given the chance to use a prothesis or at least to try one out. My Physiotherapist thinks I could be the only person or one of a very few in Scotland to have both conditions at the same time. Any suggestions or comments would be most welcome. Thanks.


Lillian Ann

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