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Heather Mills - Amputee Forum
Gizmo

Arms, hands, legs...does it make a difference?

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Just the other day I read this posting by a guy who sort of complained that arm and hand amputees were a minority here and that they were, on the whole, in a worse position. How do you perceive that? From an "able-bodied point of view" I think that leg amputees rather have the chance to hide their disability; artificial arms are more obvious to the public; moreover, artificial legs are not that necessary for "fine monitoring" to the same degree as artificial arms. Right?

I once did a project on Tanzania with an integration school (meaning mixing disabled and non disabled students) and one teacher (who was severly disabled from polio herself-walking with crutches) told me that she had major problems with people who missed one or two arms.. she had one girl with no arms in her class and it took her forever to get used to "just looking at her", "how she kept using her feet as her arms in an animal-like fashion to grab pens and books" and that she found it really hard not to stare at this girl all the time.

How do you feel about that? Do you think that you are "better off" than arm amputees?

Which disability do you think is the more severe one, the one which determines more modifications in your life style?

Regards,

Gizmo

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Giz,

I'm going to add my 2 cents here.

I think the worse amputation would be a quad amp. Having no hands or no feet would be the most challenging of all.. Well I think so anyway. The next would be a bilateral AK.

Then a hip disartic. Then a Bilateral AK/BK. Then bilateral above elbow. Then an above elbow. Then a AK. Then a bilateral BK. Then a BK.

Brenda

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I my opinion , I think losing ones vision would be the worst thing since everything is based on visual cues and everything is desgned for visual sensation .

mj

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Loving sports so much, losing part of my mobility would probably be a major shock.. But considering everything, blindness and deafness is probably worse. Being dependent on someone, losing oneĀ“s freedom. Deafness is a much underestimated disability, since although it is invisible at first, it represents an incredible communication disability. You open your mouth and people do either not understand you at all or out of ignorance jump to the conclusion that you are mentally disabled because of the speech impediment which automatically comes with deafness.

I have learnt sign language and a good friend of mine is a deaf psychologist who studied at Gallaudet university. She is quite a looker, but when she opens her mouth people are utterly shocked and think she is a retard since her speech is so bad - apart from the fact that people do not understand her at all at first!

Can you imagine the frustration to always get this "Oh my God" look from people..

Plus not being able to communicate properly with your surroundings (only about 30% is understood by reading lips - at least in the German language; only 11 out of 26 letters are clearly visible, all the rest is combination and speculation).

And quite a "bad" disability is CP: the combination of a speech impediment with movements that depict the person to be a retard or a drunk or both... quite frustrating.. but in contrast to the deaf, they HEAR all the derogatory remarks which are made about them..

Regards,

gizmo

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I think they all have their challenges and you can't really say one is worse than the other.

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I agree with Hickster,

but I wonder how much it depends on the 'person' who has the disability.

I know some amps (bk & ak) who live their lives sitting in wheelchairs at home. They've not even tried prosthesises and don't go out. And yet for the most part they seem happy. I'm not 'knocking' them or anyone else who have 'chosen' that option.

I wonder if the thought ' being an amp is not for me' so I won't be one; has occurred in their minds at some point?

One of the organisations I support are the Mouth and Foot artists. IMO the art they produce is very good of a very high standard. As it says in their name, they paint holding their brushes etc in either their foot or mouth. They send out xmas cards that are prints of their work and ask if you would like to purchase them. You don't have to, or 'bin' them or return them. They are not a charity, but earn their living this way. And selling prints of their pictures etc.

I often wonder about the amazing things disabled people do, and if they were not disabled would they have done them?

Best regards

Steve

(who er... just wonders)

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Hi, I've never seen myself better off or worse than any other physically challenged person. Guess I'm to busy with other things, than to be comsumed with, who's worse or better off. I'm just who I am and try not to compare.

As far as the most challenging, I agree with Brenda and MJ. I think to be a quad, would be, in my opinion, the most difficult, to just accomplish day to day living. Then losing one's site, tho I do have glaucoma in both eyes and hopefully we got to it early enough, so that it can be prolonged for years to come. I can't imagine ever not being able to see the ones I love, the sky, trees, ocean, birds, etc.

I believe whatever you have to use to survive, hands, feet, mouth, whatever, just do it and be proud of the fact that you accomplished it. If other people can't handle such things, then let that be their problem. ;)

Sheila, LBK

Maine, USA

Keep Smiling :)

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Lili! Glad you are back! You are the MOST qualified to post on this line....please dive in!!

Judy

LBK

Utah

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I work with a guy who has an artificial arm and I myself wear an artificial leg (RLBK). I never really notice if things are "more difficult" for him than myself as he seems to cope very well. I am quite a busy person who enjoys life and have always been an amputee. Perhaps this has made it easier to accept the situation and not dwell on it as an issue too much, so i can't really answer the debate really! I know this is a cliche and may sound patronising (hope it doesn't) but I think that people like ourselves are pretty special for not just getting through life like we are but ENJOYING the ride too. All my friends are able bodied but moan and worry about the daftest of things! I am glad that due to my experiences that I don't have the burden of "sweating the small stuff" and feel proud of myself and of the rest of you for being the type of people we are. I always try to bear in mind if I have an indulgent down day, that there are people out there with much worse conditions/illnesses than ourselves and I feel grateful for EVERYTHING that I have. This forum is fantastic by the way. It is so nice to read things from people in similar situations and to know that there are those out there that have similar problems to me. It is refreshing that so many of you are positive and informative. Cheers. Best Regards Cookie

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((((Hugs Lili)))) I certainly appreciate your perspective. Being alone in your thoughts would truly be a shame, you have so much intelligence and good energy to share with folks. Take care of your eyes and the rest of your wonderful self.

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Thanks Lili, for typing all that out. I know we all appreciate it, all the regulars, but also a lot of people who will stumble onto this site in the months to come. Hope it didnt wear you out!

I will be praying for your eyes...it just would NOT be fair if you lost all sight.....

Judy

LBK

Utah

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Dear Lili and everyone else ofcourse,

Thanks for sharing your very honest feelings/thoughts here.

You have the rare ability of juggling humour, the more serious issues of life and 'cleverness' together without dropping any balls....well, once in a while you do, ha!

Don't you find the combination very enriching ? Your thoughts must be high-wired due to the deafness, and the sight difficulties. You are alive. More so than most people without any 'handicap'!

Everyone on this forum has something worthwhile to share whether it's their loss of arms, legs, feet, hands....We all deal with our circumstances differently and on different terms.

As for myself, i'm at peace with my situation. This should be accepted too!

So, that was my sermon for the day

cheerio

Kaz

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Lili,

That was beautiful. Thank you for sharing your poem with us.

I echo what everybody else has just said. I really hope and pray that everything works out ok for you, with your eyes and everything. You have certainly enriched our lives by being here.

Lots of love, and hugs,

Afet xxx

Bilateral b/k

London, England

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Hi Lili, would just like to add a little something else I forgot to mention. That being, your poem was Excellent. I really enjoyed reading it and also printed it out, hope that's ok, so that others in my family can read it as well. As I've stated, sometimes when we lose something, we're blessed with something else, and that you surely have been. :D

One other thing, my husband was watching a fishing program on tv earlier today, the guy was Hank Parker and he had a guy fishing with him, that only had a part of his right arm, no other limbs. That just totally amazed me, seeing him out there having a great time on this bass boat, casting that reel out like a pro..... unbelievable. It truely says to me what one can do, when the mind is determined not to let anything, anyone get in the way. ;)

Sheila, LBK

Maine- USA

Keep Smiling :)

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Hi Lili, I have Road Runner by Time Warner, so everything downloads in a flash, no dial-up connecitons b/c it runs through the cable and I just love it. A little expensive, but I look at it this way, he's happy with his remote, I with my mouse = a very happy home :lol: Thank you for taking the time to re-write it. :rolleyes: Have a great weekend

Sheila, LBK

Maine- USA

Keep Smiling :)

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