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NeoAmputee

Hello~ I need help~

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Hello~

First, I am new to this amputation area ( I just got amputated, RBK, on June 2nd 2004). I am still in discomfort but can manage those pains :) . However, I have been searching for the prosthetic leg that allow me to be as much active as before the amputation. The product that I ended up with was Ceterus from Ossur. However, I just could not find any review on it. Can anyone tell me how much satisfying it is? Just tell me your opinion on Ceterus.

PS: One more thing... how much is Ceterus? I know I should ask my prosthetists but I just wanna know before I get there. I am self-paying. :unsure:

Thank you so much in advance of your kind reply.

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hi all

i am not brand new amputee but, since surgeon did poor job with amputation 1 yrs ago, leg was never right and revision was done less than a yr ago

i am still trying to get leg right and am frustrated, i have pin now, but had suction, leg seems to always be a bit loose, if i lift leg off floor and shake it , it moves around so much, i feel i am stepping out of it, my prothetist has remade socket so many times.

of u "experienced" amputees, did this feeling occur for first year? does it ever seem to fit tightly? if i add socks, it just feels i am too tall and the pin is even harder to get in, i pound foot on floor to get in and i now have cuts that hurt so much

help and thanks so much

sue

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Hi all,

I'm a RBK since November 2003 and doing really well. I have a pin system with an Iceross Comfort Liner - had no problems at all - if you have to 'bounce' the pin into the socket - get your prosthetist to make a leather 'washer' place it into the pin up to the point where your last ratchet goes in - it will enable you to get that last click into the socket - I had this and it works.

I've got a Flex Foot - Elation and its been really good for me. It has enough spring for me to do all that I want to do - gym, walking, hills, slopes etc.

As for cost - I know that the foot alone cost my limb centre £800.00 - just for the foot.

Sue - Cardiff - UK

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Hi Sue. I have had a lot of very similar problems over the years so I'll try explain the things I've found to work best. What I've found is that pins can be really tricky to get in, but especially if you don't get the liner on with the pin pointing at just the right angle. Practice and lots of trial and error will help, but especially try donning the liner with the base placed slightly further back on the base of your stump as this often helps to 'cup' the muscle tissue better in the bottom and the pin tends to sit straighter. Do you also have a pelite liner in the socket which you remove before putting on your limb? (Usually white or grey foam type thing that pulls out of the socket). If so make sure you have pulled yourself right into that before attempting to put on the leg. I find that I need to use something like a spare sock or anything similar that comes to hand to hold the pin as otherwise I take the skin off my fingers doing this <_< Then when putting on the leg you will probably need to also push the pelite down round the edges to get your last click.

What type of socks do you use? The reason I ask is there are a variety available with differing thicknesses and while an extra towelling or woolly (gawd do they still do those horrible woolly ones?) for example might make you sit too high, a slightly thinner cotton one added might do the trick. I also find that prestretching my stump with the liner on by gently pulling the pin also helps to get in the socket and get all your clicks better. I haven't been told about this 'ere washer that Sue's mentioned, but sounds good-another gripe to add to the list next visit :lol:

As for the leg seeming quite wobbly, well I have always found that to be uncomfortable and unsecure feeling, whether the leg would actually drop off or not, so I've always used a suspension sleeve too. They come in a couple of different materials, some heavier duty and stiffer than others. Juzo make an elastic and cotton type one which is a tubular sleeve which rolls half over the top of the prosthesis and half over your own leg once the leg is on. Then there is a neoprene one which is fitted the same way only it's heavier duty and good if you need to feel really secure with your leg and improves 'proprioception' and reduces that wobbly feeling no end. They are also a cheap and easy solution in the short term and great for making the top of your leg look more tidy especially if you've got tonnes of socks on.

As your leg is quite soon after post op, then starting to wear a leg and getting more active is sure to make your stump reduce quite considerably, so you may find for a time you keep having to add a sock every so often to stay comfortable in the socket, but do keep going back to have your socket altered or recast if you find you are adding more than say 5 thick socks. You may also find that your leg may need a sock adding as the day wears on and your leg may get looser as the stump shrinks under the pressure and activity. It helps I think to make sure you wear a shrinker over night or when not wearing your leg, up 'til you put on your leg as this will help prevent it swelling back up too much which can make things more tricky getting your leg on.

Umm, I also found a teeny bit of 3 in 1 oil or a similar lubricant applied to the pin helps it slide in better but I dunno if you are actually meant to do that?????? B)

Hope the ten page essay helps some-god I've rambled haven't I? :angry:

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I Sue,

I have both kind of legs, the saction one that was made almost 10 years ago but I feel so much more confident that I had it redone just last month. To wear this one, I have a nylon funny shaped sleeve that I put on and with a little handle at the end I pull from a hole in the bottom of the socket and pull the nylon out fitting my stump all the way in, then I put a screw to tight and let go all the air inside. It is safe and when I start feeling unconfortable, I let some air in, moving my muscle inside a little bit and then let the out again. The first leg I had done didn't give me any support at all. I felt like my leg was a big pensil in a very shallow tube, it would make me fall, no way I could stand and walk because my leg was woobling inside since my muscles were gone, only flab was left.... I went to Chicago and there a group of prothetists looked at it and said exactly what I tried to tell the one who had made it.. well Hall made my leg and that is the one I do all my yard work, my housework etc..at the end it was so bit up that I had to ask him please don't change anything, just copy it. which he did it. Now before that, about 3 years ago, I went back to the first prothetist, the one who screw up badly before, I told him what was wrong with the leg he had made... he promesed to do the way I want, very deep cone... he made the pin leg for me...at the begining it was very dificult to put it on...I joked about how to find the hole if I could not see it...ah, ah. well I got a way..I have a long shoe hone (sorry if that is not how to spell), the thing that help to put your shoe on...any way, I stuck it between the hard plastic and the silocon socket until I get to the pin and there I force my stump in until I hear the click, then I take it out and stuck it in another area of the socket, and on i go until I had gone all around the stump. If I lift my leg and it feels heavy, it means I still have another click to do. Now I like the pin but I know that next one I will demand to have a deeper socket, It will hold my pelvic better. I also use a belt, although everybody tells me I should not need..I feel better with it.

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Welcome to our little family, Neo Amputee. I am Dea and since 95 I have been an Above Knee Amputee or better put aka. I am sorry I can not give you an good answer, however, with regard to payment, there is the Barr Foundarion to see if you would qualify for any support. You can get more information on the BUAAF, The Barr United Amputee Assistance Fund , or to request an application for funding, contact the UASA office in Orlando, Florida, at (407) 359-5500 also http://www.oandp.com/resources/organizations/barr/index2.htm

Hope I helped,

Love,

Dea

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Hello~

First, I am new to this amputation area ( I just got amputated, RBK, on June 2nd 2004).  I am still in discomfort but can manage those pains  :) .  However, I have been searching for the prosthetic leg that allow me to be as much active as before the amputation.  The product that I ended up with was Ceterus from Ossur.  However, I just could not find any review on it.  Can anyone tell me how much satisfying it is? Just tell me your opinion on Ceterus.

PS: One more thing... how much is Ceterus? I know I should ask my prosthetists but I just wanna know before I get there.  I am self-paying.  :angry:

Thank you so much in advance of your kind reply.

Neo... for one so new to being an amputee, you seem really sure you know the best foot for you already. I would advise you to take plenty of time to work with your prosthetist to get a comfortable socket and get used to being an amputee on limbs prescribed to you by a qualified practitioner before making your own mind up about what foot you want. Don't be tempted to rush in to getting what you persieve to be the best straight away. You'd be surprised at how many different feet and foot function choices there are, and ultimately how similar many of them perform. Don't get hung up on a name.

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As a bilateral amputee, I have tried the Ceterus, Pathfinder, Luxon DP on different feet in comparison to the others. I have also tried the College Park Venture as a pair and the Freedom 1000 as a pair.

In regards to the Ceterus, it was a very smooth flowing foot that liked to walk quickly. The heel was a little stiff for my liking, but this can be adjusted and changed (I never did though, so that is my fault). The foot was also the easiest to run in. There is some heavyness in it, so a really good suspension is necessary, especially toward the end of the day. However, there is a ton of energy return, so the weigh is smoothly hidden. If you have little toddlers (children) around, you will want your prosthetist to pad or change the attachment screws that stick out....I would hate to see a little child fall onto those.

The other feet had good characteristics and individual characteristics that were better than the others in different categories. However, I have not finished my paper discussing them....so therefore I am only putting down a brief portion about the Ceterus.

As to pricing, this varies by region and one cannot give an accurate discription until one talks to your prosthetist and also negotiates.

It was stated before that the socket makes a big difference in the quality of the foot. I agree completely....and this is really what you are paying the prostheits for...the initial fit and the service to maintain that fit.

Hope this helps.

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Hello~

I Thank all of you guys for your kind reply. I have been waiting for someone who can actually give me some insights of these products that I found online. And you guys certainly gave me some insights and some of new issues that I need to think about. :)

I scheduled an appointment on Wednesday to see a prosthetist. It has been only two weeks since I recieved the amputation, and the wound is not completely healed yet. I am so worried. What if my wound just pops and opens? :(

I just want to get back with my life as soon as possible. I am just glad that I found this forum.

Anyway, I thank you guys again for your reply.

ps: I do not know how to negociate the price without knowing the invoice price of the components.

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Hello everybody~ :D

My visit to the prosthesist was very satisfying; prosthesists and employees from that place were kind and informative. They suggested me to wear a temporary leg for a while until my residual leg gets in shape. However, I have a concern about the cost for the temporary leg. My prosthesist said that it will cost me about $ 1,100 because it is not that sophisticated one. I was happy to hear that because it is not even close to what I was thinking. Then later one of the employees called and told me the cost for the leg, which is about $ 6,000 with 20 % discount for self-payer. Maybe because he said much cheaper price earlier, somehow I feel cheated. But I do not want to insult them or offend them but I feel like I should visit another prosthesist to compare the price for similar leg. To do so, I need to get the price for the components for my leg, which I think possibly insulting to them. I do not know what to do. Should I ask them for their price for each components they select and compare the price to other prosthesist?

I feel like I gave you guys too much to think about. If my post offended anyone, I really apologize. :)

Thank you so much~ :rolleyes:

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Neo--you never have to feel bad about asking for prices to do some comparing. It is no different than aksing doctors for second opinions. You need to do what is best for you and I would bet they have had the same thing happen before. If they do put up a fuss you may need to think about not coming back. To me that sends a bad message. Good luck!

Caroln

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Dear Neo,

I am sorry to hear that the price was mis-quoted at first. However, the 6K price does seem in range depending on components and which medicare district you are in. In order to price shop, I would first get a firm quote in writing (with an expiration date) as well as the L-codes used (or a list of types of feet, socket system, etc). Then, with that, you can compare prices. However, be careful that you are comparing apples to apples so that the components (mainly feet and socket systems) are the same. Also be sure to check the amount of follow-up care (which is included in the price of the leg). Also, be happy that your prosthetist seems honest with stating that you need a temporary leg. If you plan on going back to work, you can also try the state office of Vocational Rehab. They do pay for prosthesis if one is planning to go back to work or working but cannot afford or does not have prosthetic insurance coverage. Hope this helps.

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Dear Peglegx2. I see you said you are a bilateral. Are you above or below the knee? I am above the knees and am curious how your rehab. is going or went. I am walking with c-legs and 2 forearm canes. My left limb is very short. I also have pin fit on both. Right now balance is an issue. I've had stubbies made with feet but still have trouble walking and balance with them. I've had the legs for 7 mos. Feel free to e-mail me. Thanks..............................Vince

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Thank you all you guys for your reply.

I visited the website for the state office of vocational rehabilitation. They really state that they can help supply qualified disabled individuals with prosthetics. I emailed one of their officers. I hope they have some good news for me.

On Thursday, I have the follow-up appointment at the hospital. However, my wound did not completely heal yet; low volume of drainage still comes out from the tip of the end of my residual limb. I am just hoping nothing is wrong with the spot.

Ok my fellow friends~ :D Thank you for listening to me and I will keep you updated.

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